Dennis Muilenburg

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Dennis Muilenburg
Dennis Muilenburg (cropped).jpg
Muilenburg in 2011
Born1964 (age 54–55)
NationalityAmerican
Alma materIowa State University
University of Washington
OccupationBusinessman
SalaryUS$23,392,187 (total compensation, 2018)[1]
TitlePresident, chairman and CEO, Boeing
TermJuly 2015–present
PredecessorJames McNerney

Dennis A. Muilenburg (born 1964) is an American businessman who is the president, chairman and chief executive officer of The Boeing Company since July 1, 2015.

Early life and education[edit]

Muilenburg grew up on a farm in Iowa.[2]

He graduated in 1982 from Sioux Center High School in Sioux Center, Iowa.[3] He received a bachelor's degree in Aerospace Engineering from Iowa State University, followed by a master's degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the University of Washington.[1]

Career[edit]

Muilenburg started work at Boeing as an intern in 1985.[4][5]

Muilenburg held numerous management and engineering positions on various Boeing programs, including the X-32 (Boeing’s entry in the Joint Strike Fighter competition); Boeing’s participation in the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor fighter; the YAL-1 747 Airborne Laser; the High Speed Civil Transport; and the Condor unmanned reconnaissance aircraft. He later served as vice president of the Boeing Combat Systems division. Muilenburg served as president and chief executive officer of Boeing Integrated Defense Systems (later renamed Boeing Defense, Space & Security (BDS) from Sept 2009 till 2015.

At the 787-10 Dreamliner rollout ceremony with President Donald Trump

In June 2015, Boeing announced that Muilenburg would succeed James McNerney, who was stepping down after ten years as CEO.[5]

In February 2016, it was announced that Muilenburg would also succeed McNerney as Boeing's chairman.[6]

In March 2016, Muilenburg became the chairman of the board of directors of The Boeing Company.[7]

In 2017 Muilenburg has stated his top tips for leadership as "React quickly. Events can change everything. So must you.", "Know your team. What really matters to them, on every scale?", "Chart the course. What should the next 100 years look like?"[8]

In March 2019, as a result of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash and the Lion Air Flight 610 crash, which occurred five months prior to the Ethiopian crash, most airlines and countries began grounding the Boeing 737 MAX 8 due to safety concerns.[9] On 12 March, President Donald Trump spoke to Muilenburg and received assurances that the aircraft was safe.[10]

Memberships[edit]

Board memberships

Current
Previous

Other memberships

Personal[edit]

Muilenburg cycles about 120 miles per week around the Chicago area, where Boeing is headquartered, and drinks Diet Mountain Dew.[18][19][20][21]

Muilenburg is a church member and has spoken about managing overall life.[2]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Executive Profile: Dennis A. Muilenburg". Bloomberg. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Tom Hufty (October 3, 2018). "Episode 4 - Faith at Work: an interview with Dennis Muilenburg, CEO of The Boeing Company from PointTaken". PointTaken (Podcast). First Baptist Maryville. Retrieved May 30, 2019 – via www.stitcher.com.
  3. ^ Weilenga, Renee (November 23, 2018). "Boeing CEO returns to native county". Sioux Center News. Archived from the original on February 8, 2019. Retrieved May 7, 2019 – via www.nwestiowa.com.
  4. ^ Zhang, Benjamin (June 23, 2015). "The new Boeing CEO started as an intern at the company". Business Insider. Insider Inc. Retrieved May 30, 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Boeing names new chief executive". Daily Telegraph. Associated Press. June 23, 2015. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  6. ^ Johnsson, Julie (February 22, 2016). "McNerney retiring, Boeing adds chairman role for Muilenburg". The Seattle Times. Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on February 24, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Boeing: Dennis A. Muilenburg". Boeing.com. The Boeing Company. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  8. ^ Coyd, Kevin (December 12, 2017). "A career in the aerospace age". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved May 30, 2019 – via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  9. ^ "US and Canada are the only two nations still flying many Boeing 737 Max planes". CNN. March 12, 2019.
  10. ^ "Trump tweets on airplanes, speaks to Boeing CEO in wake of 737 MAX..." March 12, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019 – via www.reuters.com.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Dennis A Muilenburg, Boeing Co/The: Profile and Biography - Bloomberg Markets". bloomberg.com. Archived from the original on April 28, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  12. ^ "Board of Trustees | The National WWII Museum | New Orleans". The National WWII Museum. New Orleans. Archived from the original on November 12, 2018. Retrieved May 27, 2019 – via nationalww2museum.org.
  13. ^ "Caterpillar | Board of Directors". caterpillar.com. Archived from the original on April 1, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  14. ^ "Officers and Directors | US-China Business Council". uschina.org. US-China Business Council. Archived from the original on April 18, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  15. ^ "AIA Announces Board Elections for 2017 - Aerospace Industries Association". aia-aerospace.org. Aerospace Industries Association. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  16. ^ "Board of Directors | Business Roundtable". business roundtable.org. Business Roundtable. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  17. ^ Weitering, Hanneke (February 21, 2018). "VP Mike Pence Announces Candidates for National Space Council Advisory Group". Space.com. Archived from the original on February 21, 2018. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  18. ^ Ostrower, Jon; Cameron, Doug (June 26, 2015). "Boeing's Incoming CEO Is Engineer With Swagger". The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company. Retrieved May 30, 2019 – via www.wsj.com.
  19. ^ Rubenstein, David (August 8, 2018). "Why Boeing's CEO Rides 140 Miles Per Week on His Bike". The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations. Bloomberg. Retrieved May 31, 2019 – via www.bloomberg.com.
  20. ^ Middlebrook, Hailey (October 11, 2018). "Here's Why Biking Makes CEOs Better Leaders". Bicycling. Hearst Magazine Media, Inc. Retrieved May 31, 2019 – via bicycling.com.
  21. ^ Bogaisky, Jeremy (April 12, 2019). "Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg Faces Mounting Pressure From 737 MAX Crashes". Forbes. Forbes Media LLC. Retrieved May 31, 2019 – via forbes.com.
  22. ^ "2019 AIAA Fellows Dinner". aiaa.org. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  23. ^ "AUSA Announces 2017 National Awards | Association of the United States Army". ausa.org. September 8, 2017. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  24. ^ "Honorees | Thurgood Marshall College Fund". tmcf.org. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  25. ^ "2018 Honorees | UW College of Engineering". Archived from the original on March 30, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.

External links[edit]

Business positions
Preceded by
James McNerney
CEO of Boeing
2015– present
Succeeded by
Current