Denny Ashburnham

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Sir Denny Ashburnham, 1st Baronet (c.1628–1697) was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1660 and 1689.

Background[edit]

Ashburnham was the eldest son of Lawrence Ashburnham of Broomham Park, Guestling, Sussex, and his second wife Bridget Fleetwood, daughter of Sir George Fleetwood.[1] His paternal grandfather was Adam Ashburnham, who sat in the Parliament of England.[2]

Career[edit]

Letter from Sir Robert Long to Sir George Downing, instructing payment to Sir Denny Ashburnham of £6 interest on £200 lent. 1669

Ashburnham was a Commissioner for the Militia and became a Justice of the Peace for Sussex in March 1660. In April 1660, he was elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Hastings in the Convention Parliament. He was re-elected MP for Hastings in 1661 for the Cavalier Parliament.[3] On 15 May 1661, he was created a baronet, of Bromham, in the County of Sussex.[1] In 1665, Ashburnham was appointed a Commissioner of the Excise, a post he held for the next three years and again from 1688 until 1689.[3] He became a Deputy Lieutenant for Sussex in 1670. He was a Victualler of the Navy in 1671 and also between 1673 and 1677.[3] Ashburnham was several times a Commissioner for Assessment and between 1683 and 1689 served as Commissioner for Hearth-tax.[3] In 1685, he was nominated mayor of Hastings.[3]

In the aftermath of the so-called Popish Plot, Ashburnham was summoned in the trial of Titus Oates as a witness.[4]

Ashburnham died at the age of about 68 and was buried at Guestling on 11 December 1697.[3]

Family[edit]

Ashburnham married firstly Frances Ashburnham, daughter of John Ashburnham and aunt of John Ashburnham, 1st Baron Ashburnham.[5] After her death, he married Anne Watkins, daughter of Sir David Watkins on 14 September 1675.[5] He had four sons and two daughters by his first wife and three sons and one daughter by his second wife.[5] Ashburnham was buried at Guestling in Sussex and was succeeded in the baronetcy by his sons William and Charles successively.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Burke, John (1832). A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage of the British Empire. vol. I (4th ed.). London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 49. 
  2. ^ a b "ThePeerage - Sir Denny Ashburnham, 1st Bt". Retrieved 26 January 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f History of Parliament Online - Ashburnham, Denny
  4. ^ Pollock, John (2005). Mervyn Archdall, ed. The Popish Plot: A Study in the History of the Reign of Charles II. Kessinger Publishing. p. 331. ISBN 1-4179-6576-2. 
  5. ^ a b c Debrett, John (1828). Debrett's Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. vol. I (17th ed.). London: G. Woodfall. p. 294. 
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Rump Parliament
Member of Parliament for Hastings
1660–1679
With: Nicholas Delves 1660–1661
Edmund Waller 1661–1679
Succeeded by
Sir Robert Parker
John Ashburnham
Preceded by
Sir Robert Parker
Thomas Mun
Member of Parliament for Hastings
1685–1689
With: John Ashburnham
Succeeded by
John Ashburnham
Thomas Mun
Baronetage of England
New creation Baronet
(of Bromham)
1661–1697
Succeeded by
William Ashburnham