Denton Confederate Soldier Monument

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Denton Confederate Soldier Monument
CSA monument, Denton, Texas.jpeg
The monument c. 2000
Completion date1918
LocationDenton, Texas, United States

The Denton Confederate Soldier Monument is an outdoor Confederate memorial installed downtown Denton, Texas, in the United States.[1]

Description and history[edit]

The monument was funded and erected in 1918 by the Katie Daffan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.[2] The statue depicts an armed Confederate soldier standing on an arch with the inscription, "Our Confederate Soldiers".

The monument was named a Texas Historic Landmark in 1970, a National Historic Registry landmark in 1977, and a Texas State Archeological Landmark in 1981.[3][4]

The monument was vandalized with the words "This Is Racist" in 2015.[5] One local resident, Willie Hudspeth, had been working to remove the memorial since 2000.[6] On February 1, 2018, Denton County leaders voted 12-3 to keep the statue but add a plaque denouncing slavery and a video kiosk explaining the city's racial history and progress.[7]

The monument is on the Make It Right Project's 2018 list of ten Confederate monuments it most wants to see removed.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Confederate Memorial - Denton Texas - American Civil War Monuments and Memorials on Waymarking.com". www.waymarking.com.
  2. ^ Little, Carol Morris, A Comprehensive Guide to Outdoor Sculpture in Texas, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1996 p. 196-197
  3. ^ "Denton Confederate Soldier Monument Draws Debate".
  4. ^ McPhate, Christian (16 August 2017). "Turning 100, a Confederate Soldier Monument in Denton Faces an Uncertain Future".
  5. ^ "Video shows pair vandalizing Confederate monument in Denton". 20 July 2015.
  6. ^ Andrea Lucia. "Denton Man Fights For 17 Years To Have Confederate Monument Removed".
  7. ^ Evans, Molly (February 6, 2018). "Commissioners OK Plan To Keep Denton Confederate Statue On Square — With Context". KERA. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  8. ^ Independent Media Institute (2018). "10 Most Unwanted". Retrieved November 5, 2018.