Department of the Director of Dockyards

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Department of the Director of Dockyards
Naval Ensign of Great Britain (1707–1800).svg
Agency overview
Formed1872
Preceding agency
Dissolved1964
Superseding agency
  • Dockyards and Fleet Maintenance Department
JurisdictionGovernment of the United Kingdom
HeadquartersAdmiralty
London
Agency executives
  • Director-General of Dockyards
  • Director of Dockyards
  • Director of Fleet Maintenance
  • Director of Marine Services
Parent departmentAdmiralty

The Department of the Director of Dockyards,[1] also known as the Dockyard Branch[2] and later as the Dockyards and Fleet Maintenance Department,[3] was the British Admiralty department responsible from 1872 to 1964 for civil administration of dockyards, the building of ships, the maintenance and repair of ships at dockyards and factories, and the supervision of all civil dockyard personnel.

History[edit]

Originally, responsibility for the civil management of Royal Navy Dockyards lay with the Navy Board, and in particular the Surveyor of the Navy who supervised the Navy Board's resident commissioners of the navy based at each individual yard. Following the abolition of the Navy Board in 1832, responsibility for administration of the yards passed to the Board of Admiralty.[4] The resident commissioners were replaced by yard superintendents, however they were primarily responsible for military administration of the yards.

The Surveyor of the Navy survived the re-organisation until 1869, when his office was merged with that of the Third Naval Lord to become Controller of the Navy.[5] Between 1850 and 1861, the dockyards had been subject to an investigation into management practices; the committee responsible for the investigation concluded that under the existing system was completely inefficient.[6] In 1872, to ease the burden of work on the Controller and to action reforms suggested by the inquiry, a Surveyor of Dockyards was appointed to answer these criticisms. He was originally supervised by the Director of Naval Construction, who was responsible for both design and construction, and also dockyard work.

In December 1885 the post of Surveyor of Dockyards was abolished and replaced by a Director of Dockyards.[7] The new Director was instructed to visit the dockyards frequently, "for the purpose of conferring personally with the superintendents and officers in regard to the ships and works in progress." [8] However, inefficiencies led to a recommendation by George Robinson, Lord Ripon in which he suggested there should be a separation of the functions and duties of the naval design and construction branches, which would remain distinct from each other,[9] and that the branches should both coordinate and operate a sort of checks and balance system.[10] A set of instructions issued on 28 May 1886 communicated that the Director of Dockyards would no longer be subordinate to the Director of Naval Construction.[11] Instead, he was made solely responsible to the Controller for the building of ships at dockyards, and for the maintenance and repair of ships, of boats, and of all steam machinery in ships, boats, dockyards, and factories.[12] In 1892 the post of Director of Dockyards was changed to Director of Dockyards and Works until 1913, when it was again renamed to Director of Dockyards and Repair.

During and after World War One, from 1917 to 1919, further restructuring with the Admiralty took place with the creation of the post of Deputy Controller for Dockyards and Shipbuilding, to which the Director of Dockyards and Repairs would now report to. The department under this name would remain in place until 1957, when it was renamed Dockyards and Fleet Maintenance Department under the control of a Director-General until 1964.[13] Following the merger of the Admiralty into a new and much larger Ministry of Defence under the Navy Department, it was again renamed as the Department of Dockyards and Maintenance until 1968.[14] In 1969, overall responsibility for dockyards changed, and now came under the control of a new Chief Executive, Royal Dockyards.[15] who was head of the Royal Dockyards Management Board.[16]

Duties[edit]

A director's duties included:[17]

  • assisting the Controller in the preparation of the estimates for plant and machinery required for all naval establishments;
  • exercising control of naval expenditure at all home yards;
  • exercising control of naval expenditure at all overseas yards;
  • general management of the dockyards at home and the naval yards abroad;
  • managing the economical performance of the dockyards at home and the naval yards abroad;
  • preparing annual programmes of work (subject to approval in the dockyards at home and the naval yards abroad;
  • preparing of the Navy Estimates, to determine the work to be done in the dockyards;
  • regulating the number, appropriation, and pay of the men, and the supply of necessary materials through the Director of Stores, in accordance with the approved shipbuilding programme;
  • submitting proposals relative to necessary works to be carried out in the yards by the Department of the Director of Works;
  • superintending the building of ships and boats of all classes;
  • superintending the proper maintenance and repairing of ships and their machinery, and the keeping of vessels up to the approved standard; and
  • supplying relevant machinery and appliances and provide instruction of the use of both in the yards and factories, as well as in the victualling yards.

Incumbents[edit]

Head of Department included:

Surveyor of Dockyards[edit]

  • Sir Frederick Barnes, 1872 - December 1885) [18]

Director of Dockyards[edit]

Director of Dockyards and Works[edit]

Director of Dockyards and Repair[edit]

Director-General of Dockyards and Maintenance[edit]

Note: RADM Haynes remained as Director-General, Dockyards and Maintenance with the new Ministry of Defence from May 1964 until 1969.

Structure of Department[edit]

As of Spring 1962 [36]
  • Office of the Director-General Dockyards and Maintenance ---------- Office of the Civil Assistant to the Director-General Dockyards and Maintenance
    • Divisions
      • Dockyards
        • Construction Departments
        • Draughting Departments
        • Electrical Departments
        • Engineering Departments
        • Maintenance Departments
        • Salvage Departments
        • Training Sections

Dockyard Division

  • Office of the Director Dockyard Division
    • Office of the Deputy Director Dockyard Division
      • Office of the Assistant Director Dockyard Division, Ships
      • Office of the Assistant Director Dockyard Division, Shore
      • Office of the Assistant Director Dockyard Division, Management Techniques
      • Office of the Assistant Director Dockyard Division, General
      • Office of the Assistant Director Dockyard Division, Nuclear
      • Office of the Assistant Director Dockyard Division, Personnel
      • Office of the Assistant Director Dockyard Division, Finance
        • Office of the Chief Constructor
        • Office of the Chief Draughtsman
        • Office of the Superintending Mechanical Engineer
        • Telecommunications Section
        • Management Training Section

Fleet Maintenance Division

  • Office of the Director Fleet Maintenance Division
    • Office of the Deputy Director Fleet Maintenance Division
      • Office of the Assistant Director Fleet Maintenance Division
      • Office of the Assistant Director Fleet Maintenance Division, Constructive

Marine Services Division

  • Office of the Director Marine Services Division
    • Office of the Deputy Marine Services Maintenance Division
      • Office of the Assistant Director Marine Services Division
        • Civil Staff Department (officer's responsible for boom defences, examiner of works, moorings, salvage, moorings)
          • Yard Machinery District, Scottish
          • Yard Machinery District, Northern
          • Yard Machinery District, Midland
          • Yard Machinery District, Southern

Naval Dockyards

Yards operating from 1860 onward during the existence of this department included.[37]

Timeline[edit]

  • Navy Board, Surveyor of the Navy, Dockyard Commissioners, 1546-1832
  • Board of Admiralty, Surveyor of the Navy, Dockyard Branch, 1832-1860
  • Board of Admiralty, Department of the Surveyor of Dockyards, 1872-1885
  • Board of Admiralty, Department of the Director of Dockyards, 1885-1958
  • Board of Admiralty, Dockyards and Maintenance Department, 1958-1964
  • Ministry of Defence, Navy Department, Department of Dockyards and Maintenance, 1964-1968
  • Ministry of Defence, Navy Department, Chief of Fleet Support Department, Department of Dockyards, 1969-1971.

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Archives, The National. "Records of Dockyards". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 1690-1981, ADM 312. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  2. ^ Haas, J. M. (1994). A Management Odyssey: The Royal Dockyards, 1714-1914. University Press of America. p. 190. ISBN 9780819194619.
  3. ^ Archives, The National. "Director General Dockyards and Fleet Maintenance Department: report on Vote 8 Ship Drawing Offices at HM Dockyard, Chatham, Kent". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 1 Jan 1961 - 31 Dec, ADM 312/4. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  4. ^ Winfield, Rif (30 April 2014). British Warships in the Age of Sail 1817-1863: Design, Construction, Careers and Fates. Seaforth Publishing. p. 399. ISBN 9781473849624.
  5. ^ Archives, The National. "Records of the Surveyor of the Navy and successors". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 1620-1979. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  6. ^ Coats, Dr Anne; Davies, Dr David. "20TH CENTURY NAVAL DOCKYARDS: DEVONPORT AND PORTSMOUTH CHARACTERISATION REPORT". Historic England. Naval Dockyards Society, part 1, p.2, 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  7. ^ Brassey, Earl Thomas Allnutt (1909). Brassey's Annual: The Armed Forces Year-book. Praeger Publishers. p. 68.
  8. ^ Hamilton, Sir Vesey (1896). "IV". The Constitution, Character and Functions of the Board of Admiralty and the Civil Departments it Directs. George Bell and Sons. ISBN 9781150465000.
  9. ^ Leggett, Don (2015). Shaping the Royal Navy: Technology, Authority and Naval Architecture, C.1830-1906. Oxford University Press. p. 217. ISBN 9780719090288.
  10. ^ Leggett, Don (2015). Shaping the Royal Navy: Technology, Authority and Naval Architecture, C.1830-1906. Oxford University Press. p. 217. ISBN 9780719090288.
  11. ^ Hamilton, Sir Vesey (1896). "IV". The Constitution, Character and Functions of the Board of Admiralty and the Civil Departments it Directs. George Bell and Sons. ISBN 9781150465000.
  12. ^ Committee on Naval Affairs, United States. Congress. House (1910). Hearings on the Proposed Reorganization of the Navy Department Before the Committee on Naval Affairs of the House of Representatives [December 16, 1909 to February 17, 1910. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 727.
  13. ^ Archives, The National. "Records of Dockyards". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 1690-1981, ADM 312. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  14. ^ Archives, The National. "Records of Dockyards". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 1690-1981, ADM 312. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  15. ^ Smith, Gordon. "Royal Navy, including Administration, 1961-1970". www.naval-history.net. Gordon Smith, 10 July 2011. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  16. ^ "House of Commons 27 July 1971". Hansard.
  17. ^ Hamilton, Sir Vesey (1896). "IV". The Constitution, Character and Functions of the Board of Admiralty and the Civil Departments it Directs. George Bell and Sons. ISBN 9781150465000.
  18. ^ Haas, J. M. (1994). A Management Odyssey: The Royal Dockyards, 1714-1914. University Press of America. p. 128. ISBN 9780819194619.
  19. ^ Haas, J. M. (1994). A Management Odyssey: The Royal Dockyards, 1714-1914. University Press of America. p. 128. ISBN 9780819194619.
  20. ^ Stationary, Office (1888). The Navy List. John Murray and Son. p. 301.
  21. ^ Stationary, Office (1892). The Navy List. John Murray and Son. p. 349.
  22. ^ Haas, J. M. (1994). A Management Odyssey: The Royal Dockyards, 1714-1914. University Press of America. p. 171. ISBN 9780819194619.
  23. ^ Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony. "Director of Dockyards and Repair (Royal Navy) - The Dreadnought Project". dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell, 18 June 2016. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  24. ^ Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony. "Director of Dockyards and Repair (Royal Navy) - The Dreadnought Project". dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell, 18 June 2016. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  25. ^ Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony. "Director of Dockyards and Repair (Royal Navy) - The Dreadnought Project". dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell, 18 June 2016. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  26. ^ Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony. "Director of Dockyards and Repair (Royal Navy) - The Dreadnought Project". dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell, 18 June 2016. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  27. ^ Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony. "Director of Dockyards and Repair (Royal Navy) - The Dreadnought Project". dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell, 18 June 2016. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  28. ^ Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony. "Director of Dockyards and Repair (Royal Navy) - The Dreadnought Project". dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell, 18 June 2016. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  29. ^ Government, H.M. (May 1951). "Admiralty Department and Staff". The Navy List. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 344.
  30. ^ Government, H.M. (May 1954). "Admiralty Department and Staff". The Navy List. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 428.
  31. ^ Government, H.M. (April 1956). "Admiralty Department and Staff". The Navy List. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 1269.
  32. ^ Government, H.M. (18 January 1958). "Admiralty Department and Staff". The Navy List. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 1246.
  33. ^ Government, H.M. (April 1962). "Admiralty Department and Staff". The Navy List. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 927.
  34. ^ Houterman, J.N. "Royal Navy (RN) Officers 1939-1945 -- S". unithistories.com. Retrieved 31 July 2017.
  35. ^ Government, H.M. (April 1968). "Admiralty Department and Staff". The Navy List. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 546.
  36. ^ Government, H.M. (April 1962). "Admiralty Departments and Staff". The Navy List. H.M. Stationery Office. pp. 927–928.
  37. ^ "Research guide B5: Royal Naval Dockyards". Royal Museums Greenwich UNESCO World Heritage Site In London. Royal Museums Greenwich. 11 June 2002. Retrieved 1 August 2017.

Sources

  • Archives. The National. (1690-1981) "Records of Dockyards". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives. ADM 312.
  • Brassey, Earl Thomas Allnutt (1909). Brassey's Annual: The Armed Forces Year-book. Praeger Publishers.
  • Coats, Dr Anne; Davies, Dr David. (2015) "20TH CENTURY NAVAL DOCKYARDS: DEVONPORT AND PORTSMOUTH CHARACTERISATION REPORT". Historic England. Naval Dockyards Society.
  • Committee on Naval Affairs, United States. Congress. House (1910). Hearings on the Proposed Reorganization of the Navy Department Before the Committee on Naval Affairs of the House of Representatives [December 16, 1909 to February 17, 1910. U.S. Government Printing Office.
  • Government H.M. "The Navy List" (various 1869 to 1970), H.M. Stationery Office. London. England
  • Hamilton, Sir Vesey (1896). "IV". The Constitution, Character and Functions of the Board of Admiralty and the Civil Departments it Directs. George Bell and Sons. ISBN 9781150465000.
  • Haas, J. M. (1994). A Management Odyssey: The Royal Dockyards, 1714-1914. University Press of America. ISBN 9780819194619.
  • Harley, Simon; Lovell, Tony. (2016) "Director of Dockyards and Repair (Royal Navy) - The Dreadnought Project". dreadnoughtproject.org. Harley and Lovell' .
  • Leggett, Don (2015). Shaping the Royal Navy: Technology, Authority and Naval Architecture, C.1830-1906. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780719090288.
  • Puddefoot, Geoff (2010). Ready For Anything: The Royal Fleet Auxiliary 1905-1950. Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 9781848320741.
  • Rodger, N.A.M. (1979). The Admiralty. Offices of State. Lavenham: T. Dalton. ISBN 0900963948.
  • Winfield, Rif (2014). British Warships in the Age of Sail 1817-1863: Design, Construction, Careers and Fates. Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 9781473849624.

External links[edit]