Depth peeling

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Depth peeling is a method of Order-independent transparency. Depth peeling has the advantage of being able to generate correct results even for complex images containing intersecting transparent objects.

Method[edit]

"its quality and performance determined by the number of rendering passes.."

Depth peeling works by rendering the image multiple times.[1] The twist is that depth peeling uses two Z buffers, one that works conventionally, and one that is not modified, and sets the minimum distance at which a fragment can be drawn without being discarded. For each pass, the previous pass' conventional Z-buffer is used as the minimal Z-buffer, so each pass draws what was "behind" the previous pass. The resulting images can be combined to form a single image.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Everitt, Cass (2001-05-15). "Interactive Order-Independent Transparency" (PDF). Nvidia. Retrieved 2008-10-12.