Derek Boshier

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Derek Boshier (born 1937, in Portsmouth) is an English artist, among the first proponents of British pop art. [1][2] He works in various media including painting, drawing, collage, and sculpture. In the 1970s he shifted from painting to photography, film, video, assemblage, and installations, but he returned to painting by the end of the decade. [3] Addressing the question of what shapes his work, Boshier once stated "Most important is life itself, my sources tend to be current events, personal events, social and political situations, and a sense of place and places". [4]

Education and Profession[edit]

Derek Boshier attended Yeovil School of art in Somerset, England from 1953-1957 (B.F.A.). He attended the Royal College of Art in London, 1959-1962 alongside David Hockney, Allen Jones and Peter Phillips, receiving his M.F.A. in 1962.[5] The boredom of the previous few years of National Service in the [Royal Engineers] had been alleviated by reading the works of Marshall McLuhan. During his college years, his work was didactic, commenting on the space race, the all-powerful multinationals and the increasing Americanisation of English culture.[6]

After graduating, he spent a year travelling in India on an Indian government scholarship. Boshier served as an instructor at the Central School of Art and Design, London from 1963-1979 and concurrently at the Royal Collage of Art London from 1973-1979. Boshier moved to Houston Texas in 1980, after accepting a one year visiting artist position at the University of Houston, and then joined the faculty there from 1981-1992. He moved back to England 1992-1997 and later joined the faculty of the California Institute of Arts in Los Angeles in 1997. [7][8]

Career[edit]

He appeared with Peter Blake, Pauline Boty and Peter Phillips in Pop Goes the Easel (1962), a film by Ken Russell for the BBC's Monitor series. Boshier later played the role of John Everett Millais in Russell's television film Dante's Inferno (1967); his girlfriend Gala Mitchell played Jane Morris.

Never one to allow his message to be governed by any particular medium, at the 1964 The New Generation show at the Whitechapel Gallery he exhibited large shaped canvases with vibrant areas of evenly applied colour. Boshier's work was included in the exhibition "Around the Automobile" in 1965 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York.[9] After 1966 he has used metal, coloured plastics, even neon light, the materials of the commercial sign maker, to create three-dimensional objects. Also he has experimented both with books and film.[5]

During the early 1970s Boshier taught at Central School of Art and Design where one of his pupils was John Mellor (later known as Joe Strummer of The Clash). This led to Boshier designing The Clash's second song book. Boshier also worked on designs for David Bowie including cover art for Lodger and Let's Dance.[10]

Derek Boshier moved to Houston, Texas in the 1980s, at a time when contemporary art in Texas and Houston in particular, were receiving national and international attention. The Houston skyline and other impressions of the region, from cowboys to corporate business executives (suggestive of the oil industry or Texas Instruments Inc.), appeared in a number of his canvases from this period. Several notable museum exhibitions included or surveyed his work form this period including: "Derek Boshier: Paintings from 1980–1981", Contemporary Arts Museum Houston 1981[11]; "Derek Boshier: Texas Works", Institute of Contemporary Arts, London 1982[12]; "Fresh Paint, The Houston School" Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 1985 (travling to P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center (now MoMA PS1), Long Island City, New York)[13]; "Derek Boshier: The Texas Years", Contemporary Art Museum, Houston 1995[14].

Boshier now lives in Los Angeles, USA.[5] Social commentary has once more become a major element of his work tackling head on subjects that have strong political overtones such as gun control, police brutality and once again, the multinationals - this time on home turf. He is a visiting lecturer at University of California Los Angeles School of Arts where he teaches drawing.

He enjoys his beautiful daughters Rosa, Lillian, granddog Olive, and pseudo-daughter Robin.

Public collections[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Exhibition Catalogues

  • Anonymous (1982). Derek Boshier: Texas Works. Institute of Contemporary Arts. London, 32 pp.
  • Barbara Rose and Susie Kalil (1985). Fresh Paint, The Houston School. Texas Monthly Press, Austin, Texas. 256 pp.
  • Mayo, Marti, Guy Brett, and Lynn Herbert (1995). Derek Boshier: The Texas Years. Contemporary Art Museum, Houston/Distributed Art Publishers. 64 pp.
  • Weitman, Wendy (1999). Pop Impressions Europe/USA: Prints and Multiples from A The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 136 pp.
  • Derek Boshier Works on paper, a retrospective 1955-2003 [Catalogue of the exhibition held at Mary Elizabeth Dee Shaw Gallery 2003] Utah.
  • Derek Boshier: New Paintings, Chemical Culture Series [Catalogue of the exhibition held at Flowers East 2008] London.
  • Extreme Makeover [Catalogue of the exhibition held at Flowers Gallery May 9 - June 14, 2008] New York.

Journals, Magazines, and Newspapers

  • Bloom, Suzanne and Ed Hill (1985), Derek Boshier, Texas Gllery. Artforum, September, 24(1): 131
  • Cotter, Holland (1986). Derek Boshier at TotahStelling. Art in America, October, 74(10): 57-59.
  • Reinhold, Robert (1983). Cities in Texas Witness Flowering of Fine Arts. New York Times, May 14.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Greene, Alison de Lima (2000). Texas: 150 Works from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers. New York, New York, 279 pp. [with contritbutions by Shannon Halwes, Kathleen Robinson, Robert Montgomery, Monica Garza, Jason Goldstein, and Alejandra Jiménez]
  2. ^ Livingstone, Marco (1990). Pop Art: A Continuing History. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers. New York, New York, 272 pp
  3. ^ Greene, Alison de Lima (2000). Texas: 150 Works from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers. New York, New York, 279 pp. [with contritbutions by Shannon Halwes, Kathleen Robinson, Robert Montgomery, Monica Garza, Jason Goldstein, and Alejandra Jiménez]
  4. ^ Carlozzi, Annette, Gay Block, Laurel Jones. (1986). 50 Texas Artist: A Critical Selection of Painters and Sculptors Working in Texas. Chronicle Books, San Francisco. 120 pp.
  5. ^ a b c 13 paintings by or after Derek Boshier, Art UK. Retrieved 1 August 2014. Text from "Boshier, Derek" A Dictionary of Modern and Contemporary Art by Ian Chilvers and John Glaves-Smith. Oxford University Press Inc.
  6. ^ Livingstone, Marco (1990). Pop Art: A Continuing History. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers. New York, New York, 272 pp
  7. ^ Barbara Rose and Susie Kalil (1985). Fresh Paint, The Houston School. Texas Monthly Press, Austin, Texas. 256 pp.
  8. ^ Montgomery, Robert (2000). Derek Boshier, 225-226 pp. in Greene, Alison de Lima. Texas: 150 Works from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers. New York, New York, 279 pp
  9. ^ https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/1993?locale=en
  10. ^ "Derek Boshier: David Bowie And The Clash". The Argus. Brighton. 29 June 2012. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  11. ^ Brutvan, Cheryl (1981). Boshier: Paintings from 1980–1981", Contemporary Art Museum, Houston. 6 pp.
  12. ^ Anonymous (1982). Derek Boshier: Texas Works. Institute of Contemporary Arts. London, 32 pp.
  13. ^ Barbara Rose and Susie Kalil (1985). Fresh Paint, The Houston School. Texas Monthly Press, Austin, Texas. 256 pp
  14. ^ Mayo, Marti, Guy Brett, and Lynn Herbert (1995). Derek Boshier: The Texas Years. Contemporary Art Museum, Houston/Distributed Art Publishers. 64 pp.
  15. ^ "Derek Boshier - The Identi-Kit Man - 1962". Tate.org.uk. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  16. ^ Weitman, Wendy (1999). Pop Impressions Europe/USA: Prints and Multiples from A The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 136 pp.

External links[edit]