Derek Nash (musician)

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Derek Nash
Born (1961-07-28) July 28, 1961 (age 56)
Stockport
Genres Jazz
Occupation(s) Saxophonist, recording engineer
Instruments Saxophone
Years active circa 1982–present
Associated acts Sax Appeal,
Jools Holland Rhythm and Blues Orchestra

Derek Nash (born 28 July 1961) is a British jazz saxophonist, band leader and recording engineer.

For over thirty years, Nash has led Sax Appeal, which won the John Dankworth Award for Ensemble in the 1998 B.T. Jazz Awards, and subsequently the British Jazz Award for best small group in 2000. He also leads the funk/fusion band Protect the Beat.

He has been a member of the Jools Holland Rhythm and Blues Orchestra since 2004,

After studying electroacoustics at Salford University, Nash became a sound engineer at the BBC in 1982, leaving in 2002 to become a full-time musician and to set up his own Clowns Pocket Recording Studio.[1]

Derek Nash's Clowns Pocket Recording Studio has been used by many British musicians to record, mix and master albums including Jamie Cullum, George Melly, Stan Tracey, Tony Remy, Georgie Fame, Dave O'Higgins, Evelina De Lain, Geoff Gascoyne and many others.

Nash has performed with David Sanborn, John Dankworth, Dick Morrissey, Spike Robinson, Humphrey Lyttelton, Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Solomon Burke, Annie Lennox, Eddie Floyd, Madeleine Peyroux, Roger Daltrey, Eddi Reader, Tom Jones, Don Grusin, Dave Grusin, John Etheridge, Russell Ferrante, Nelson Rangell, Snake Davis, Bob Dorough, Oscar Castro Neves, Clare Teal, Jamie Cullum, Alan Barnes, Axel Zwingenberger, Dave Green, Charlie Watts, George Melly, Bob Dorough, Shakatak, Lulu, India Arie, Alison Moyet, Clark Tracey, Alec Dankworth, Ben Waters, Digby Fairweather and Jools Holland.[1][2]

The album he recorded with Spike Robinson, Young Lions, Old Tigers (2000), was named Best Jazz CD of the Year.,[2] a feat repeated in 2012 with his "Joyriding" album by the Derek Nash Acoustic Quartet. Both albums are released on JAZZIZIT Records and Nash is a co-director of the label.

Awards[edit]

  • Best Jazz CD of the Year for Joyriding with the Derek Nash Acoustic Quartet (2012)
  • Best Jazz CD of the Year for Young Lions, Old Tigers with Spike Robinson (2002)
  • British Jazz Award (Small Group) for Sax Appeal (2000)
  • John Dankworth Award for Ensemble in the B.T. Jazz awards (1998)

Nominations[edit]

  • Nominated for British Jazz Award Alto Saxophone 2015
  • Nominated for British Jazz Award Alto Saxophone 2014
  • Nominated for Jazz Musician of the Year by the Global Music Foundation and voted in the Top 3 Alto Saxophonists in the 2010 British Jazz Awards.

Discography[edit]

As leader/co-leader[edit]

  • 2015: "'You've Got To Dig It To Dig It,You Dig? – with Dave Newton, Geoff Gascoyne and Sebastiaan de Krom (Plus guest Martin Shaw)
  • 2012: "'Joyriding – with Dave Newton, Geoff Gascoyne and Sebastiaan de Krom (Plus guests Martin Shaw and Winston Rollins)
  • 2009: Snapshot – with Jan Lundgren, Geoff Gascoyne and Steve Brown
  • 2000: Young Lions, Old Tigers – with Spike Robinson, Pete Cater, Nick Weldon, Rob Rickenberg
  • 1998: Setting New Standards – with Clark Tracey, Alec Dankworth and Graham Harvey
With Sax Appeal
  • 2014: "Funkerdeen"
  • 2006: The Flatiron Suite
  • 2000: Take No Prisoners
  • 1997: Outside In
  • 1994: Let's Go
  • 1991: Flat Out
With Protect the Beat
  • 2007: Intrepid with Darby Todd,Winston Blissett,Tim Cansfield+Arden hart
  • 2002: It Ain't Dinner Jazz
With PICANTE
  • 2015: Five Note Salsa - with Dominic Ashworth, Neil Angilley, Geoff Gascoyne, Marc Cecil, Chris Storr and Louise Marshall

As sideman[edit]

With the Jools Holland Rhythm and Blues Orchestra
  • "Sirens of Song" 2014
  • "The Golden Age of Song" 2012
  • "Rockinghorse" 2010
  • "The Informer" 2008
  • "Best of Friends" 2007
  • "Moving Out to the Country" 2006
  • "Swinging the Blues, Dancing the Ska" 2005
  • "Tom Jones and Jools Holland" 2004
With Ben Waters
  • Shakin' in the Makin'
  • Hurricane
  • Boogie for Stu

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Biography Allmusic. Retrieved 14 August 2013.
  2. ^ a b Jazznet: Biography Retrieved 14 August 2013.