Derek Quigley

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The Honourable
Derek Quigley
QSO
Derek Quigley, 1963.tif
Quigley in 1963
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Rangiora
In office
1975 – 1984
Preceded by Kerry Burke
Succeeded by Jim Gerard
Member of Parliament
for ACT Party List
In office
1996 – 1999
Personal details
Born (1932-01-31) 31 January 1932 (age 85)
Waikari,
Nationality New Zealand
Political party National Party (1962–1984)
ACT (1995 – 1999)

Derek Francis Quigley, QSO (born 31 January 1932) is a former New Zealand politician. He was a prominent member of the National Party during the late 1970s and early 1980s, and was known for his support of free market economics and trade liberalisation. Quigley left the National Party after clashing with its leadership, and later co-founded the ACT party.

Early life[edit]

Quigley was born in 1932 in Waikari, a small town in the northern Canterbury region. He attended Waipara Primary school before continuing with education in Christchurch; first at Medbury School, then Christ's College, followed by Canterbury University.[1] He later donated his personal parliamentary library, which covers his political career until 1984, to Canterbury University's Macmillan Brown Library.[2]

He farmed at Waipara from 1949. He gained one of two scholarships for young farmers from the Meat and Wool Board and used it to study farming in Britain and the United States. He completed a law degree while farming and joined a Christchurch law firm, where he became a senior partner and practised as a lawyer.[1]

Member of Parliament[edit]

Parliament of New Zealand
Years Term Electorate List Party
1975–1978 38th Rangiora National
1978–1981 39th Rangiora National
1981–1984 40th Rangiora National
1996–1999 45th List 2 ACT

Quigley was National's electorate chairman for the Rangiora electorate. In the Canterbury-Westland division, he was deputy chairman. He was a member of the Dominion Council and served on its executive committee.[1]

As a 30-year-old, Quigley stood as the National Party's candidate in the 1962 by-election in the Timaru electorate, but was beaten by Labour's Basil Arthur.[3][4] He also stood in Sydenham in the 1960 and 1963 elections.[5]

Quigley stood in the Rangiora electorate in the 1975 election.[6][7] The electorate had been taken from National by Kerry Burke of the Labour Party at the previous election, but was won back by Quigley.[8]

Cabinet Minister[edit]

After three years as a backbencher, Quigley was appointed to Cabinet, and held a number of ministerial roles. He was Minister of Housing (1978–1982), Minister of Tourism (1981), Minister of Works and Development (1981–1982), and Associate Minister of Finance (1978–1981).[9] He held further minor ministerial posts as Minister of Earthquake and War Damage (1978–1982),[10] Minister of Government Life Insurance (1978–1982),[11] Minister of Public Trust (1978–1981),[12] and Minister of State Insurance (1978–1982).[13]

Quigley rapidly earned the hostility of senior National Party figures, however, with his criticism of the government's economic policies. The Prime Minister of the day, Robert Muldoon, favoured decidedly interventionist policies, but Quigley preferred a more laissez-faire approach, and considered Muldoon's interventionism to be contrary to the traditional spirit of the National Party.[14] In February 1981, Quigley contested the deputy leadership of the party, despite Muldoon openly saying that he could not work with him. Quigley's main opponent (and Muldoon's strong favourite) was Duncan MacIntyre, a long-serving Muldoon loyalist. Bill Birch retired from the contest in favour of MacIntyre, and Jim Bolger was eliminated first. Quigley was narrowly defeated by MacIntyre.[15]

A week after Quigley lost the deputy leadership race, he was dismissed by Muldoon as Associate Finance Minister, reducing his ability to criticise Muldoon's economic policies effectively; Warren Cooper succeeded him.[16]

Quigley nevertheless continued his attacks. In June the following year, he made a public denunciation of the government's policies, saying that the state should have a passive role in the economy. Muldoon and his allies reacted furiously to this public criticism, and Quigley was given the choice of either giving a public apology or resigning from Cabinet; he chose to resign.[17][18] At the 1984 election, he resigned from politics altogether, becoming a business consultant.[6]

ACT New Zealand[edit]

One of his many consulting projects was to chair a major review of New Zealand defence for the Lange government.

In 1995, Quigley re-entered the political arena, joining forces with Roger Douglas to form the ACT New Zealand party. The new MMP electoral system, which made it easier for smaller parties to win seats, convinced Quigley that a strongly free-market party could indeed be successful. In the 1996 election, the first conducted under MMP, Quigley was returned to Parliament as an ACT list MP and chaired the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Select Committee during the next three years. Under Quigley's chairmanship, the select committee produced The Defence Beyond 2000 Report, which became the blueprint for the Clark government's radical restructuring of the New Zealand Defence Force.

Quigley did not stand for re-election in 1999 election and was immediately appointed by the incoming Prime Minister to review the contract the previous government had signed with the United States for New Zealand to acquire 28 near new F-16 fighter aircraft. Quigley advised the government to renegotiate the contract and acquire a lesser number of aircraft. One of his reasons for this recommendation was that cancellation of the contract would result in the abandonment of the RNZAF's air combat capability. The government disputed this and cancelled the contract. Two years later, it disbanded the RNZAF's air combat capability, just as predicted.

Since early 2004, Quigley and his family have been living in Canberra, where Quigley is a Visiting Fellow at ANU's Strategic & Defence Studies Centre. He is writing extensively on trans Tasman and regional security issues and on the ongoing situation between the United States and New Zealand over the latter's anti-nuclear policy.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gustafson 1986, p. 338.
  2. ^ "Donor: Derek Quigley" (PDF). University of Canterbury. Retrieved 26 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 90.
  4. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 181.
  5. ^ Norton, Clifford (1988). New Zealand Parliamentary Election Results 1946-1987: Occasional Publications No 1, Department of Political Science. Wellington: Victoria University of Wellington. ISBN 0-475-11200-8. 
  6. ^ a b Wilson 1985, p. 228.
  7. ^ Templeton 1995, p. 12.
  8. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 187.
  9. ^ Wilson 1985, pp. 96, 116.
  10. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 119.
  11. ^ Wilson 1985, pp. 120–121.
  12. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 128.
  13. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 131.
  14. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 132.
  15. ^ Gustafson 1986, pp. 141–143.
  16. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 143.
  17. ^ Mulgan 2004, p. 88.
  18. ^ Gustafson 1986, pp. 147–148.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

    • Conference papers: information needs of the earthquake insurance industry in New Zealand, 27–29 November 1989, n.p.: n.p., 1989 
  • Quigley's contribution is a paper entitled: "Should the state play a role as an insurer?"
    • Azizian, Rouben; McNamara, Malcolm (eds.); Alison, Miranda (1999), New Zealand foreign and defence policy at the end of the 20th century: views of political parties: proceedings of a pre-election seminar held at the University of Auckland, 21 October 1999, Wellington, [N.Z.]: Centre for Strategic Studies, Victoria University of Wellington in association with Auckland Branch of the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs 
  • Quigley's contribution is a statement of the policy of the ACT Party.
    • Heyrick, Murray (1995), Quigley: a necessary evil? : an analysis of the New Zealand defence resource management review (1988) and its impact on the development of the New Zealand defence forces, M.P.P. - Victoria University of Wellington 
    • Quigley, Derek (chair) (1980), Government Cabinet/Caucus Committee report: the New Zealand Accident Compensation Scheme: a review, Wellington, [N.Z.]: The Committee 
    • Quigley, Derek (1989), New Zealand defence: resource management review, 1988, Wellington, [N.Z.]: Ministry of Defence 
  • This report is known better as either the Quigley Report or the Strategos Report.
    • Quigley, Derek (2000), Review of the lease of F-16 aircraft for the Royal New Zealand Airforce [electronic resource], Wellington, [N.Z.]: New Zealand Government Executive, retrieved 7 April 2008 
    • Quigley, Derek (2006), The war against defence restructuring: a case study on changes leading to the current structure of New Zealand defence [Canberra papers on strategy and defence ; 166], Canberra, [A.C.T.]: Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, The Australian National University, ISBN 978-0-7315-5477-5 
    • Quigley, Derek (2007), The defence diarchy: a case study on its abolition in New Zealand [Working paper (Australian National University. Strategic and Defence Studies Centre); 402], Canberra, [A.C.T.]: Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, The Australian National University, ISBN 978-0-7315-5478-2 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1990), The Quigley report, Auckland, [N.Z.]: N.Z. Professional Firefighters' Union 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1997), Inquiry into New Zealand's place in the world and New Zealand's role in Asia-Pacific Regional Security: report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, Wellington, [N.Z.]: House of Representatives 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1997), Inquiry into Parliament's role in the international treaty process: report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, Forty-Fifth Parliament, Wellington, [N.Z.]: House of Representatives 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1998), Inquiry into defence beyond 2000: interim report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, Wellington, [N.Z.]: Published by order of the House of Representatives 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1999), Inquiry into defence beyond 2000: report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, Wellington, [N.Z.]: House of Representatives 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1999), Inquiry into the appointment process for the Director of the Centre for Strategic Studies: report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, Wellington, [N.Z.]: House of Representatives 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1999), Inquiry into the implications of New Zealand's participation in APEC: interim report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, Wellington, [N.Z.]: House of Representatives 
    • Quigley, Derek; et al. (1999), Review of the international treaty examination process: report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee, Wellington, [N.Z.]: House of Representatives 
    • Quigley, Derek; Estall, Roger J.; Wheeler, Brent (1989), Fire sprinkler technology: costs and benefits: a study carried out for the New Zealand Fire Service Commission, Wellington, [N.Z.]: The Commission