Derks Field

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Derks Field
Former names Community Park
(1915–1940)
Location 1300 South & West Temple
Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.
Owner City of Salt Lake City
Operator City of Salt Lake City
Capacity 10,000 (1958–1993)
  5,000 (1947–1957)
Surface Natural grass
Construction
Opened 1915, 1947
Expanded 1958
Closed 1993
Demolished 1993 [1]
Tenants
Salt Lake City Bees (PioL/PCL) (1947–1984)
Salt Lake City Trappers (PioL) (1985–1992)
Salt Lake Sting (APSL) (1990–1991)

Derks Field was a minor league baseball park in the western United States, located in Salt Lake City, Utah. It was the home field of the Salt Lake Bees, Angels, and Gulls of the Pacific Coast League, Bees, Giants, and Trappers of the Pioneer Baseball League, and the Salt Lake Sting of the American Professional Soccer League.

Opened in 1915 as Community Park,[1][2][3] the ballpark's final seating capacity was 10,000.[4] In 1940, it was named for Salt Lake Tribune sports editor John C. Derks (1873–1944).[1][5] Destroyed by arson in September 1946,[6][7][8][9] it reopened in May 1947,[2] and was expanded in 1958 with the return of the PCL.[10]

The field was aligned to the southeast, with a view of the Wasatch Range, and its elevation was 4,230 feet (1,290 m) above sea level. Its successor, Smith's Ballpark, opened on the same site 24 years ago in 1994.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Benson, Lee (July 21, 1993). "Stadium's new name complete's Salt Lake's demolition of Derks". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. D1. 
  2. ^ a b Goates, Les (May 23, 1947). "Bees pry lid off SL season". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. 1. 
  3. ^ Johnston, Jerry (April 21, 1993). "Park history included more than baseball". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. 1. 
  4. ^ Evensen, Jay (April 15, 1992). "Committee favors going with new stadium to replace Derks". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. D1. 
  5. ^ "John Charles Derks". Find a Grave. (Logan, Utah). Retrieved March 29, 2017. 
  6. ^ "Baseball park burns in Salt Lake City". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. September 25, 1946. p. 8. 
  7. ^ Mulliner, H.L. (September 27, 1946). "How Salt Lake got Derks Field". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. 17. 
  8. ^ "S.L. man admits setting Derks fire". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). September 30, 1946. p. 1. 
  9. ^ Florez, John (April 12, 2014). "Derks – a 'Field of Dreams'". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). Retrieved March 29, 2017. 
  10. ^ Chipman, Dee (April 28, 1958). "Welcome Bees". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. C1. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°44′28″N 111°53′35″W / 40.741°N 111.893°W / 40.741; -111.893