Desire Me

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Desire Me
Greer Garson in Desire Me.JPG
Greer Garson in Desire Me (1947)
Directed by Jack Conway (uncredited)
George Cukor (uncredited)
Mervyn Le Roy (uncredited)
Victor Saville (uncredited)
Produced by Arthur Hornblow
Starring Greer Garson
Robert Mitchum
Richard Hart
Production
company
Release date
1947
Country US
Language English
Budget $4,149,000[1][2]
Box office $2,576,000[1]

Desire Me is a 1947 American film. It had a troubled production and was issued without a director's credit.[3]

Plot[edit]

While trying to escape a Nazi prisoner-of-war camp, Paul Aubert is shot, but his friend Jean Renaud manages to get away safely. Jean leaves him for dead and travels to the village of Paul's beloved wife, Marise.

Marise is shocked to discover that Jean knows practically everything about her, Paul having confided in his friend many times in the camp. Jean has fallen in love with her from these stories, but when he makes romantic advances, Marise orders him to leave.

Paul is not dead. He writes a letter to Marise, explaining that he is about to be released from a hospital so he can return to her. Jean intercepts the letter and keeps it from Marise. In time, a relationship between them grows. Marise remains uncertain whether she is being untrue to her husband, who suddenly returns to the village.

Marise is ecstatic to have him back, but confesses her relationship with Jean. Paul confronts his friend over the betrayal and Jean pulls a gun on him. They struggle, and Jean is killed in a fall from a cliff.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

The film earned $1,451,000 in the US and Canada and $1,125,000 elsewhere but because if its huge cost recorded a loss of $2,440,000.[1][2][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study .
  2. ^ a b Scott Eyman, Lion of Hollywood: The Life and Legend of Louis B. Mayer, Robson, 2005 p 398
  3. ^ Desire Me at TCM
  4. ^ "Top Grossers of 1947", Variety, 7 January 1948 p 63

External links[edit]