Detana!! TwinBee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Detana!! TwinBee
Detana!! TwinBee arcade flyer.jpg
Developer(s)Konami
Publisher(s)Konami
Director(s)Masato Ohsawa
Designer(s)Hiroyuki Ashida
K. Ishimoto
Ryouhei Shogaki
Programmer(s)Toru Shimomura
Artist(s)Shūjirō Hamakawa
Composer(s)Hidenori Maezawa
Masae Nakashima
Michiru Yamane
SeriesTwinBee
Platform(s)Arcade, EZweb, i-mode, iOS, Microsoft Windows, Nintendo Switch, PC Engine, PlayStation, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Network, PlayStation Portable, Sega Saturn, Virtual Console, X68000, Xbox 360, Yahoo Mobile
Release
Genre(s)Vertically scrolling shooter
Mode(s)
Arcade systemJAMMA

Detana!! TwinBee[a] is a 1991 vertically scrolling shooter arcade video game developed and released by Konami. It is the fifth entry in the TwinBee series and the second to be released for arcades following the original TwinBee (previous sequels were released directly to home consoles). Set several years after the events of TwinBee, players assume the role of Light and Pastel (marking their debut appearance) taking control of TwinBee and WinBee to defeat invading forces of the evil alien Iva and save planet Meru after receiving an SOS message sent by princess Melora.

Detana!! TwinBee marked the debut of Japanese animator Shūjirō Hamakawa (credited under the pen name Shuzilow.Ha) as primary character designer for subsequent installments of the TwinBee series. The game proved popular among Japanese arcade players, earning several awards from Gamest magazine, while its ports to other platforms were also met with positive response from critics. A direct follow-up, Pop'n TwinBee, was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1993.

Gameplay[edit]

Arcade version screenshot.

Detana!! TwinBee is a vertically scrolling shoot 'em up game following the same conventions established in the original TwinBee, where players assume the role of Light and Pastel (whose names are given in the audio drama TwinBee Paradise) taking control of TwinBee (P1) and WinBee (P2) across seven levels to defeat invading forces of the evil alien Iva and save planet Meru after receiving an SOS message sent by princess Melora.[1][2][3]

The control configuration differs between regions; in the Japanese version, one button is used to fire the gun at airborne enemies while the other is used to drop bombs to the ground, while both buttons are used to do shoot and drop bombs at the same time in the European version.[1][2][3] Holding down the shot button will cause a power-meter at the bottom of the screen to fill up, allowing the player to fire a "Big Shot" attack when releasing the button.[1][2][3] Power-up items consist of bells which can be uncovered by shooting the floating clouds, as well as items uncovered by destroying land enemies.[1][2][3] As with TwinBee, players can shoot the floating bells to change their colors.[1][2][3] Besides the five different colors from the original TwinBee (yellow, white, blue, green, and red), two new bells are introduced: a purple bell that provides a "tail shield", activating barriers around the player's ship and a black bell that decreases speed of the ship.[1][2][3]

Mini-bells and the lucky star from the first TwinBee return as well. GwinBee, a ship similar to TwinBee and WinBee also appears, allowing players to combine their ship with GwinBee to fire wider fire beams. Two players can also align their ships side by side to achieve the same effect or align their ships vertically for a powerful five-way spread. If both players align their ships with GwinBee between them, he will spring out and destroy all on-screen enemies.[1][2][3] After the first loop is completed, players can replay it for a harder second loop. The game will be entirely over if the final stage is cleared again, but running out of lives results in a game over unless players insert more credits into the arcade machine to continue and receive a "free" power-up.

Development and release[edit]

Detana!! TwinBee was created by most of the same team that worked on several projects at Konami such as the Gradius series, with director Masato Ohsawa leading its development and Toru Shimomura served as sole programmer of the game while Hiroshi Matsuura also served as engineer.[4] Ryouhei Shogaki, Hiroyuki Ashida and K. Ishimoto acted as co-designers.[4][5] The title marked the debut of Japanese animator Shūjirō Hamakawa (credited under the pseudonym Shuzilow.Ha) in his first project as game designer, serving as character illustrator for subsequent installments of the TwinBee series.[4][6][7][8] Konami Kukeiha Club members Hidenori Maezawa, Masae Nakashima and Michiru Yamane scored the soundtrack.[4][9][10] Yamane stated she wrote the music as colorful and fun to match the "cute bee world" of the project.[9]

Detana!! TwinBee Arcade PCB.

Detana!! TwinBee was first released by Konami for arcades in Japan on February 1991 and Europe on March 1991 as Bells & Whistles.[11][12] The game was first ported to the X68000 computer on December 6, 1991.[13] The title was then ported to the PC Engine on February 28, 1992.[14] This conversion is notable for being one of the earliest works of Koji Igarashi at Konami, serving as enemy programmer.[15][16] On September 29, 1995, it was included as part of the Detana TwinBee Yahho! Deluxe Pack compilation for Sega Saturn and PlayStation.[17][18] The PlayStation version was re-released twice as a budget title; first in 1997 under the "PlayStation the Best for Family" line and later in 2003 under the "PS one Books" line.[19][20]

Detana!! TwinBee was later ported to Japanese mobile phone platforms such as EZweb, i-mode and Yahoo Mobile on July 13, 2004.[21][22][23] On January 25, 2007, the game was included as part of the TwinBee Portable collection for PlayStation Portable and later re-released as a budget title under the "Konami The Best" line on March 13, 2008.[24][25] The PC Engine conversion of the title was re-released for the Wii's Virtual Console as a "Hanabi Festival" launch in Japan on September 18, 2007, then in North America on March 23, 2009 and later in PAL territories on July 24 of the same year.[26][27][28] The PC Engine version was then re-released for the PlayStation Network as part of the "PC Engine Archives" line in Japan on June 16, 2010.[29][30] On November 24, 2010, the arcade original was included on the Game Room gaming service for Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360 as part of "Game Pack 012".[31][32] The PC Engine port was later added to the PC Engine GameBox app for iOS in Japan on February 12, 2014.[33] In addition, the PC Engine version was also re-released in Japan for Windows through D4 Enterprise's Project EGG digital service on March 3, 2014.[34]

Detana!! TwinBee was re-released in its PC Engine form between April and May 2014 across cloud gaming services like Smart TV Box, G-cluster and Hikari TV.[35][36][citation needed] The PC Engine conversion was eventually re-released only in Japan for the Wii U's Virtual Console on November 24, 2014.[37] Hamster Corporation later re-released the arcade version for Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4 on January 16, 2020 under their Arcade Archives series.[38]

Reception[edit]

In Japan, Game Machine listed Detana!! TwinBee on their March 15, 1991 issue as being the third most-popular arcade game at the time.[47] Both Martin Gaksch and Heinrich Lenhardt of German magazine Power Play regarded the game to be a nice vertical-scrolling shooter with enjoyable candy-colored visuals.[48] In the May 1991 issue of Japanese publication Micom BASIC Magazine, the game was ranked on the number six spot in popularity.[49] Maurizio Miccoli of Italian magazine Computer+Videogiochi gave the title a positive outlook.[50] Gamest gave it several awards for the 5th Gamest Grand Prize (1991), winning 3rd place in the Grand Prize, 1st place in the Best Shooting Award, 4th place in the Best Graphic Award, 3rd place in the Best VGM Award, 5th place in Player Popularity and 8th place in the Annual Hit Game.[46] Nishikawa Zenji of Japanese magazine Oh!X applauded the X68000 conversion for its arcade-accurate graphics and sound, among other aspects.[51] This version also proved popular among the X68000 userbase, eventually being nominated for a "Game of the Year" award by Oh!X but losing against other titles such as Parodius Da!.[45][52][53]

The PC Engine port received positive reception from critics who reviewed it as an import title.[54][55] Public reception was also positive: readers of PC Engine Fan voted to give Detana!! TwinBee a 24.79 out of 30 score, ranking at the number 19 spot in a poll, indicating a large popular following.[56] Both Kaneda Kun and François Hermellin of Consoles + praised the PC Engine conversion for its colorful graphics, sympathetic music and impeccable gameplay but criticized the presentation.[40] Four reviewers of Famitsu gave the PC Engine version a score of 24 out of 40.[42] Computer and Video Games's Frank O'Connor commended the PC Engine port for its arcade-accurate presentation and gameplay but criticized the music for being annoying.[41] AllGame's Kyle Knight gave positive remarks to the imaginative boss designs and enjoyable gameplay but noted the audio design to be a mixed point on the PC Engine release.[39] Olivier Prézeau of Joypad and Joystick's Jean-Marc Demoly praised the PC Engine port for its graphics, sound and controls as well.[57][58]

Reviewing the Virtual Console re-release, Nintendo Life's Corbie Dillard praised its responsive controls, arcade-accurate visuals and upbeat soundtrack.[44] IGN's Lucas M. Thomas commended its anime-inspired world and co-op play feature.[43] Eurogamer's Dan Whitehead compared it with Xevious, stating it was not as good as MUSHA nor as cute as Fantasy Zone but regarded it as an appealing vertical-scrolling shooter for casual players.[26]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Japanese: 出たな!! ツインビー, Hepburn: Detana!! TsuinBī, lit. "Here Comes TwinBee!!", also known as Bells & Whistles in Europe

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Detana!! TwinBee arcade flyer (Konami, JP)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Bells & Whistles operator's manual (Arcade, EU)
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Kalata, Kurt (January 3, 2015). "Detana!! TwinBee". Hardcore Gaming 101. Archived from the original on 2020-08-09. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  4. ^ a b c d Konami (1991). Detana!! TwinBee (Arcade). Konami. Level/area: Staff roll.
  5. ^ Gradius IV Interview. Gradius Portable Official Guide -Legend of I・II・III・IV・Gaiden-. Konami Official Books (in Japanese). Konami. 28 March 2006. pp. 144–149. ISBN 4-86155-111-0. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2020-02-20 at the Wayback Machine).
  6. ^ Ohno, Junji (15 September 1994). "Making of 極上パロディウス - 極上パロディウス開発者インタビュー!!". Gamest (in Japanese). No. 125. Shinseisha. pp. 97–100. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2020-08-11 at the Wayback Machine).
  7. ^ Hamakawa, Shūjirō (2001). "GALLERY>MAJOR-ZONE>TWIN BEE>キャラクターデザイン画 - ■ツインビーシリーズ". Shuzilow HA Design Works (in Japanese). Aya. Archived from the original on 2007-02-03. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  8. ^ Hamakawa, Shūjirō (2010). "-WORKS-". Shuzilow HA Design Works (in Japanese). Aya. Archived from the original on 2011-01-16. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  9. ^ a b Greening, Chris (February 19, 2010). "Michiru Yamane Interview: The Musical Legacy of Castlevania". vgmonline.net. Video Game Music Online. Archived from the original on 2020-01-10. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  10. ^ Fuentes, Edgar S. (February 7, 2018). "Vandal Game Music: Michiru Yamane. Música de cámara en consolas - Repasamos la carrera de una de las más importantes compositoras que han trabajado para Konami". Vandal (in Spanish). El Español. Archived from the original on 2018-02-08. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  11. ^ Yanma (April 1991). "Super Soft Hot Information: Video Games - 出たな!! ツインビー". Micom BASIC Magazine [ja] (in Japanese). No. 106. The Dempa Shimbunsha Corporation [ja]. p. 254.
  12. ^ Akagi, Masumi (13 October 2006). コナミ(コナミ工業) Konami; Konami; B. アーケードTVゲームリスト 国内•海外編 (1971-2005) (in Japanese) (1st ed.). Amusement News Agency. pp. 28, 122, 147. ISBN 978-4990251215.
  13. ^ "Other Hard's Soft - X-68000シリーズ" (in Japanese). Konami. 1996. Archived from the original on 1996-11-08. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  14. ^ "PC-Engine's Soft" (in Japanese). Konami. 1996. Archived from the original on 1996-11-08. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  15. ^ McWhertor, Michael (March 17, 2014). "Veteran Castlevania producer Koji Igarashi leaves Konami". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 2015-06-10. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  16. ^ Barder, Ollie (March 21, 2018). "Koji Igarashi On 'Bloodstained' And Why 'Aura Battler Dunbine' Is The Best Anime Ever Made". Forbes. Archived from the original on 2020-11-14. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  17. ^ "出たなツインビーヤッホー! DELUXE PACK". PlayStation Official Site Software Catalog (in Japanese). Sony Interactive Entertainment. 2020. Archived from the original on 2010-02-02. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  18. ^ "セガサターン対応ソフトウェア(ライセンシー発売)- 1994・1995年発売". SEGA HARD Encyclopedia (in Japanese). Sega. 2020. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  19. ^ "出たなツインビーヤッホー! DELUXE PACK PlayStation® the Best for Family". PlayStation Official Site Software Catalog (in Japanese). Sony Interactive Entertainment. 2020. Archived from the original on 2020-11-14. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  20. ^ "出たなツインビーヤッホー!デラックスパック PS one Books". PlayStation Official Site Software Catalog (in Japanese). Sony Interactive Entertainment. 2020. Archived from the original on 2007-09-11. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  21. ^ "『出たな!! ツインビー』が携帯電話に初登場!". Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain. July 13, 2004. Archived from the original on 2016-10-05. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  22. ^ Tsuda, Keimu (July 13, 2004). "人気ゲームがVアプリで復活、256KBアプリ対応の「ツインビー」". K-Tai Watch (in Japanese). Impress Corporation. Archived from the original on 2020-03-02. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  23. ^ "「出たな!ツインビー」Vodafoneに従量課金で登場". SoftBank Games (in Japanese). ITmedia [ja]. July 13, 2004. Archived from the original on 2020-03-11. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  24. ^ "ツインビー PORTABLE". PlayStation Official Site Software Catalog (in Japanese). Sony Interactive Entertainment. 2020. Archived from the original on 2017-05-20. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  25. ^ "ツインビー PORTABLE コナミ・ザ・ベスト". PlayStation Official Site Software Catalog (in Japanese). Sony Interactive Entertainment. 2020. Archived from the original on 2019-04-18. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  26. ^ a b c Whitehead, Dan (July 26, 2009). "Virtual Console Roundup • Page 2 - 17 games including Ogre Battle, Kirby Dream Land 3 and Smash Bros". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 2019-05-17. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  27. ^ "ゲーム - Wii: 出たな!! ツインビー (デタナ!! ツインビー)" (in Japanese). Konami. 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-05-17. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  28. ^ "One WiiWare Game and Two Virtual Console Games Added to Wii Shop Channel". Nintendo. May 26, 2008. Archived from the original on 2009-03-26. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  29. ^ "出たな!! ツインビー". PC Engine Archives (in Japanese). Hudson Soft. 2020. Archived from the original on 2010-09-20. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  30. ^ "出たな!! ツインビー". PlayStation Official Site Software Catalog (in Japanese). Sony Interactive Entertainment. 2020. Archived from the original on 2020-03-29. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  31. ^ Fletcher, JC (November 24, 2010). "Game Room adds Blades of Steel; Sunset Riders and Twinbee rumored". Engadget. Verizon Media. Archived from the original on 2020-11-14. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  32. ^ Gray, Keith (November 25, 2010). "Game Room's Game Pack 12 Now Available". TrueAchievements. TrueGaming Network. Archived from the original on 2019-03-02. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  33. ^ "iPhone/iPod touch用ゲーム集「PC Engine GameBox」のアップデート本日実施。「出たな!!ツインビー」など5タイトルが追加に". 4Gamer.net (in Japanese). Aetas Inc. February 12, 2014. Archived from the original on 2011-11-04. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  34. ^ "出たな!! ツインビー". Project EGG (in Japanese). D4 Enterprise. 2020. Archived from the original on 2020-03-12. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  35. ^ "出たな!!ツインビー/PCエンジンライブラリーVol.4 - 1992年にPCエンジンに移植された縦スクロールシューティングゲーム。". G-cluster (in Japanese). Broadmedia Corporation [ja]. May 15, 2014. Archived from the original on 2020-10-19. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  36. ^ "出たな!!ツインビー - 株式会社コナミデジタルエンタテインメント". Hikari TV [ja] (in Japanese). NTT Plala Inc. [ja]. May 29, 2014. Archived from the original on 2020-11-14. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  37. ^ "出たな!! ツインビー | Wii U | 任天堂" (in Japanese). Nintendo. November 26, 2014. Archived from the original on 2020-10-29. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  38. ^ Moyse, Chris (January 18, 2020). "Konami's cutesy shmup Bells & Whistles returns on PS4 and Nintendo Switch - Pop for Twinbee". Destructoid. Enthusiast Gaming. Archived from the original on 2020-11-14. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  39. ^ a b Knight, Kyle (1998). "Detana!! Twin Bee [Japanese] (TurboGrafx-16) – Review". AllGame. All Media Network. Archived from the original on 15 November 2014. Retrieved 13 November 2020.
  40. ^ a b Hermellin, François; Kun, Kaneda (March 1992). "PC Engine Review – Twin Bee". Consoles + [fr] (in French). No. 7. M.E.R.7 [fr]. pp. 66–67. Archived from the original on 2017-09-08. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  41. ^ a b O'Connor, Frank (May 1992). "Reviews - PC Engine: Bells & Whistles". Computer and Video Games. No. 126. EMAP. p. 61.
  42. ^ a b "NEW GAMES CROSS REVIEW: 出たな!!ツインビー (PCエンジン)". Famitsu. No. 168. ASCII Corporation. March 6, 1992. p. 38.
  43. ^ a b M. Thomas, Lucas (March 31, 2009). "Detana!! TwinBee Review - Previously exclusive to Japan, Konami's classic TwinBee series finally makes an appearance in America's Wii Shop". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2019-05-03. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  44. ^ a b Dillard, Corbie (March 23, 2009). "Detana!! TwinBee Review (TG-16) - It's the popular vertical-scrolling shooter renowned for its cute and comical world". Nintendo Life. Nlife Media. Archived from the original on 2020-02-23. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  45. ^ a b "1991年度 Game of the Year 受賞作発表". Oh!X [ja] (in Japanese). No. 121. SoftBank Creative. April 1992. pp. 27–32.
  46. ^ a b ザ・ベストゲーム2 - アーケードビデオゲーム26年の歴史: ゲーメスト大賞11年史. Gamest Mook (in Japanese). 5 (4th ed.). Shinseisha. 17 January 1998. pp. 16–17. ISBN 9784881994290.
  47. ^ "Game Machine's Best Hit Games 25 - テーブル型TVゲーム機 (Table Videos)". Game Machine [ja] (in Japanese). No. 399. Amusement Press, Inc. [ja]. 15 March 1991. p. 25.
  48. ^ Gaksch, Martin; Lenhardt, Heinrich (April 1991). "Frankfurter Messe Rundschau". Power Play [de] (in German). No. 37. Future plc. pp. 138–142.
  49. ^ Yanma (May 1991). "Super Soft Hot Information: Video Game! (ビデオゲーム) - Hot 30". Micom BASIC Magazine [ja] (in Japanese). No. 107. The Dempa Shimbunsha Corporation [ja]. p. 254.
  50. ^ Miccoli, Maurizio (August 1991). "Killed Games (Insert Coin): Bells & Whistles". Computer+Videogiochi [it] (in Italian). No. 7. Gruppo Editoriale Jackson [it]. pp. 83–84.
  51. ^ Zenji, Nishikawa (January 1992). "The Softouch - Game Review - 出たな!!ツインビー". Oh!X [ja] (in Japanese). No. 118. SoftBank Creative. pp. 30–33.
  52. ^ "The Softouch - Software Information: 今度は生中継68が王者だァ". Oh!X [ja] (in Japanese). No. 117. SoftBank Creative. December 1991. p. 32.
  53. ^ "The Softouch Special: 1991 年度 Game Of The Year ノミネート作品発表". Oh!X [ja] (in Japanese). No. 119. SoftBank Creative. February 1992. pp. 22–27.
  54. ^ Scamps, Olivier (April 1992). "Tests De Jeux: Core G. – Twin Bee". Player One [fr] (in French). No. 19. Média Système Édition [fr]. pp. 68–69.
  55. ^ Eggebrecht, Julian (June 1992). "News – Engine Ereignisse: Twin Bee". Video Games [de] (in German). No. 7. Markt & Technik. pp. 18–22.
  56. ^ "PC Engine All Catalog '93 10月号特別付録 - 出たな!!ツインビー". PC Engine Fan (in Japanese). Vol. 6 no. 10. Tokuma Shoten. 1 October 1993. p. 84.
  57. ^ Demoly, Jean-Marc; Prézeau, Olivier (May 1992). "PC Engine: Twin Bee - L'Union Des Abeilles Fait La Force!". Joypad [fr] (in French). No. 8. Yellow Media [fr]. pp. 128–129. Archived from the original on 2019-03-27. Retrieved 2020-11-13.
  58. ^ Demoly, Jean-Marc (April 1992). "Tests - PC Engine: Twin Bee". Joystick (in French). No. 26. Sipress. p. 130.

External links[edit]