Devatop Centre for Africa Development

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Devatop Centre for Africa Development
Motto bringing positive change
Founded Started as a community development project in 2013 by Joseph Osuigwe Chidiebere in Nigeria
Type Non-profit
NGO
Headquarters Abuja, Nigeria
Location
Services Equipping and empowering young people to be at the forefront of combating human trafficking, and national development.
Fields Anti-Human Trafficking, Human Rights, Education, Eradicating Gender-Based Violence, Preventing FGM, Women Empowerment, and Youth Empowerment.
Joseph Osuigwe Chidiebere
Website devatop.org

Devatop Centre for Africa Development (DCAD) is a youth-led nonprofit organization with focus on combating human trafficking, gender-based violence, child abuse, providing educational materials to vulnerable children, and empowering women and youth. The organization has been in the forefront of combating human trafficking and executing educational projects in Nigeria. DCAD is registered with Cooperate Affairs Commission Nigeria and has impacted over a million people through training, sensitization, assistance, donations and media.[1]

History[edit]

DCAD started in 2013 as a National Youth Service Community Development Project by Joseph Osuigwe Chidiebere.[2] After Mr. Osuigwe interacted with victims of sex trafficking, he was aggrieved at the rate of human trafficking in Nigeria, and this propelled him to initiate a community service to train thousands of youth, teenagers, educators, and women on how to combat human trafficking. He partnered with United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and National Agency for Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons (NAPTIP) to execute different anti-human trafficking projects.[3] In 2014, he formed a team of young people to sustain the impact, and this led to the establishment of the Devatop Centre for Africa Development.

Vision and missions[edit]

The vision of Devatop[4] is to build a nation without human trafficking and where young people are empowered for national development.[5] Her missions[6] are: To combat and prevent human trafficking, gender-based violence, & violence against children. To provide educational support to vulnerable children. To empower women and young people to be agents of national development and to play strategic roles in combating human trafficking.

Impact and controversy[edit]

Through her training, advocacy, and TV and Radio programmes, more than one million people have been sensitized[7] on anti-human trafficking and eradication of gender based violence.[8] Devatop is mainly working with young people in prevention of human trafficking. Some people have frowned at how Devatop is using young people to combat human trafficking. The organization’s idea is that since young people are the major targets of traffickers, then they need to be trained and empowered to be at the forefront of combating the monstrous crime.[9] The organization has provided educational materials and services to internally displaced children. At least 90 schools in 85 communities have benefited from her educational donations[10] and seminars.

Partnership[edit]

The organization has partnered with:

  • National Agency for Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons (NAPTIP), National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) and United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)[10] to carryout anti-human trafficking advocacy projects in Nigeria.
  • United Nations Children Education Fund (UNICEF) to provide educational materials and services to internally displaced children.[11]

Programs[edit]

  • The Pollination Project
  • The Girl Generation
  • Red card to FGM
  • World Book day

The Academy for Prevention of Human Trafficking and Other Related Matters (TAPHOM)[edit]

In 2015, the organization started a pilot project on The Academy for Prevention of Human Trafficking and Other Related Matters (TAPHOM).[3][12] The initiator, Mr. Osuigwe said, "The academy focuses on Training, Advocacy, Research, Media, Publication and Empowerment. In the first phase of the pilot project, 120 young people from 6 states in Nigeria were trained, after which they impacted the lives of 6000[9] people within 9 months. They also reported incidences of human trafficking. One of the reported cases was Amina who was abducted/trafficked from Abuja to Kano for forced marriage.[13] We eventually rescued her.[14]"

Devatop Anti-Human Trafficking Ambassadors[edit]

End Female Genital Mutilation(FGM)Advocacy[edit]

To protect the rights of women and girls, Devatop Centre for Africa Development, through her Executive Director, Joseph Osuigwe initiated End FGM Advocacy, making the organization among the leading youth-driven anti-FGM organizations in Nigeria. Devatop has gotten grants from The Girl Generation[17][18] and The Pollination Project to train[19] over 210 advocates[20] in Imo State and Abuja. The trained advocates are taking actions to reach out to 15, 000 community members.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Devatop Centre For Africa Development". End Slavery Now. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  2. ^ "Our Story – Devatop Centre for Africa Development". devatop.org. DCAD. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Maduka, Godsmercy (1 November 2016). "Committed to combating human trafficking - Writing.Com". www.writing.com. writing.com. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  4. ^ "Devatop Centre for Africa Development – bringing positive change". devatop.org. 
  5. ^ "Devatop Centre For Africa Development - End Slavery Now". www.endslaverynow.org. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  6. ^ "About Us – Devatop Centre for Africa Development". devatop.org. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  7. ^ "Profile". Confengine. 3 November 2011. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  8. ^ Maker, Difference. "Devatop Centre for Africa Development". linkedin. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Maduka, Godsmercy (1 November 2016). "Committed to combating human trafficking - Writing.Com". www.writing.com. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  10. ^ a b "Devatop Centre for Africa Development - Projects - Wikiprogress". wikiprogress.org. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  11. ^ Onumah, Chido (26 April 2016). "Devatop Centre for Africa Development and UNICEF in partnership with Teenz Global Foundation, BookmySchool, AFRICMIL and others celebrate 2016 World Book Day at IDP camps in Abuja | Chidoonumah.com". www.chidoonumah.com. Chidoonumah news. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  12. ^ Akuboh, Venessa (16 July 2015). "Academy For Human Trafficking Prevention Inaugurated In Abuja". leadership.ng. Leadership. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  13. ^ "Joseph Osuigwe Chidiebere". Confengine. 3 November 2011. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  14. ^ Media, Insight (21 September 2016). "Research presentation for International Human Trafficking Conference at University of Toledo, USA". Oak TV. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  15. ^ "DEVATOP Centre For Africa Development Inaugurates Nollywood Star, Kenneth Okonkwo, John Fashanu, Rachel Bakam, Others As Anti-Human Trafficking Ambassadors". Swift Reporters. Swift Reporters. 2 March 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. 
  16. ^ "Football Star, Popular Actor Among Anti-Human Trafficking Ambassadors | International Centre for Investigative Reporting". International Centre for Investigative Reporting. ICIR. 2 March 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. 
  17. ^ "Group Gets Grant To End Female Genital Mutilation In Nigeria | International Centre for Investigative Reporting". International Centre for Investigative Reporting. ICIR. 17 April 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. 
  18. ^ Ameh, Ejekwonyilo (4 June 2017). "Centre gets grant to execute FGM Advocacy in Okigwe". www.authorityngr.com. Authority Newspaper. Authority Newspaper. Retrieved 13 August 2017. 
  19. ^ "DEVATOP trains 115 advocates to end Female Genital Mutilation in Okigwe Zone, Imo State | Chidoonumah.com". www.chidoonumah.com. Chido Onumah. 6 July 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. 
  20. ^ "Group Trains 102 Advocates For Ending Female Genital Mutilation | International Centre for Investigative Reporting". International Centre for Investigative Reporting. ICIR. 2 May 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. 

External links[edit]