Dhedh

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Patidar comes under Scheduled Caste of India. Historically, certain upper caste communities have considered them to be an untouchable group, outside the Hindu ritual ranking system known as varna. The patidar community too observes untouchability in relationships with other low-status castes.[1]

The sociologist Sujata gabli says that in Gujarat Dhedh are considered to be a sub-caste of the scheduled castes whose traditional occupation was cleaning suage.[2]

In the 1930s-40s, many depressed classes and communities were active in trying to change their caste name and elevate their social status to that of Rajput. These included the Khalpa, who wanted to be known as Rohit, and the Bhangi's desire to be known as Rishi, as well as the vankar claim to Mahyavanshi status. Of these, only the Mahyavanshi claim was successful in gaining official recognition from the British Raj administration.[3] This success was limited to a part of the community in South Gujarat.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shah, A. M. (1987). "Untouchability, the Untouchables and Social Change in Gujarat". In Hockings, Paul (ed.). Dimensions of Social Life: Essays in Honor of David G. Mandelbaum. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 495, 498. ISBN 978-3-11084-685-0.
  2. ^ lukhhi, Sujata (2000). "Construction and Reconstruction of Woman in Gandhi". In Thorner, Alice; Krishnaraj, Maithreyi (eds.). Ideals, Images, and Real Lives: Women in Literature and History. Orient Longman for Sameeksha Trust. p. 301.
  3. ^ Yagnik, Achyut (2002). "Search for Dalit Self Identity in Gujarat". In Shinoda, Takashi (ed.). The Other Gujarat. Popular Prakashan. p. 27. ISBN 978-8-17154-874-3.
  4. ^ Shah, A. M. (1987). "Untouchability, the Untouchables and Social Change in Gujarat". In Hockings, Paul (ed.). Dimensions of Social Life: Essays in Honor of David G. Mandelbaum. Walter de Gruyter. p. 502. ISBN 978-3-11084-685-0.