Diamond Stingily

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Diamond Stingily
Born1990
Chicago, IL
NationalityAmerican

Diamond Stingily (born 1990) is an American artist and poet. Stingily's art practice explores aspects of identity, iconography and mythology, and childhood. Stingily lives and works in New York City.

Early life and education[edit]

Stingily grew up in Chicago, Illinois. As a child, Stingily spent much of her time at her mother's hair salon in West Chicago.[1] Her father, Byron Stingily, is an R&B and house-music singer and her brother, Byron Stingily Jr., is a professional football player.[2]

Stingily studied creative writing at Columbia College.[3]

Work[edit]

Stingily has exhibited at numerous galleries and museums, including Ramiken Crucible, Queer Thoughts, The Foire Internationale d'Art Contemporain (FIAC) at the Grand Palais, MOCAD Detroit, and at the New Museum in New York City.[4][5][6][7] Stingily is a published author and holds a podcast-style radio show at Know Wave called The Diamond Stingily Show.[8]

Stingily's earliest project Forever in our Hearts opened at Egg in Chicago in 2014.[9] The project simulated the artist's own death through a funeral arrangement and obituary. The show took place in a storefront display window. Accompanying the display, Stingily wrote an obituary-inspired poem that only existed online and in-print behind the window display. Egg is a project-based space in Chicago founded by artist Puppies Puppies and Forrest Nash (founder of art blog Contemporary Art Daily).[10]

In 2015, Stingily collaborated with artist Martine Syms in Syms' video work Notes on Gestures (2015).[11] Stingily was featured as the central actor in the video which examined body language, reaction GIFs, and the phrase, "Everybody wanna be a black woman but nobody wanna be a black woman."[12] Stingily stayed in New York after their collaboration.

After moving to New York Stingily began creating and showing her Kaas works in group exhibitions such as The End of Violent Crime at Queer Thoughts and Denude at Ramiken Crucible.[13]

'Love, Diamond,' Kaas, and Elephant Memory

Stingily published her first book through Dominica imprint titled, Love, Diamond. The book is a "reprint of the artist's first diary written as an 8-year-old" growing up in Chicago.[14] Stingily has kept most of her journals since she began writing at an early age and was encouraged to write by her grandmother.[15] She has performed readings with fellow artists and writers Justin Allen, Rindon Johnson, Juliana Huxtable, and Andrew Durbin.[16]

Stingily's first solo exhibition, titled Kaas, opened at Queer Thoughts in New York in May 2016.[17] The show featured a number of sculptures made of Kanekalon hair, knockers, barrettes, and beads that referenced both Kaa (the snake character made famous in Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book) and Medusa's head of snakes.[18] Later that year, Stingily's second solo exhibition, titled Elephant Memory, opened at Ramiken Crucible in New York.[19] On view were larger and more elaborate Kaas sculptures, used doors with locks, baseball bats, telephone cords, and a video work obstructed by a chain-link fence. The exhibition, "teased out issues of racial violence," in America, specifically Stingily's hometown of Chicago and New York.[20]

In 2017, Artists Space invited Stingily and artist Rindon Johnson to read from recent works alongside artists Justin Allen and Deborah Willis.[21]

Stingily was included in the New Museum's group show Trigger: Gender as a Weapon and a Tool[22]. Stingily created her largest Kaas sculpture-to-date, a hair braid piece that pierced through four floors of the museum.[23] Stingily also showed artwork through Queer Thoughts at FIAC in 2017.[24] Her third solo exhibition, titled Surveillance, opened at Ramiken Crucible in Los Angeles, California in late 2017.[25]

In November 2017, Stingily was selected by Forbes magazine for the prestigious '30 Under 30' in the Arts and Culture section.[26]

Stingily's work was exhibited in the 2018 New Museum Triennial Songs for Sabotage[27]. Her first solo museum show was held at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami in 2018.[28][29]

Themes and critical reception

Stingily's work explores various themes of racial identity and femininity, memory and childhood, iconography, surveillance and paranoia as well as freedom. Much of her work is in direct response to her "social and economic background" growing up in West Chicago.

Critics have reviewed her first two exhibitions favorably. Curator Johanna Fateman writes in Artforum that Diamond's work, "reflects on the normalization and replication of brutal scripts and systems using perfect, pervasive materials."[30] California-based curator Hanna Girma notes that "Stingily courageously navigates between consolation and discomfort, personal and shared memory. Her work celebrates youthful perception, black creativity and resilience while simultaneously thrusting the viewer into their current disposition, with its fear of contact, normalized violence and ancestral hardship."[31]

Exhibitions[edit]

Solo exhibitions

  • For The People of [__________], Freedman Fitzpatrick, Paris, France, 2018[32]
  • Surveillance, Ramiken Crucible, Los Angeles, CA, 2017[33]
  • Elephant Memory, Ramiken Crucible, New York, NY, 2016[34]
  • Kaas, Queer Thoughts, New York, NY, 2016[35]

Selected group exhibitions

  • Trigger: Gender as a Weapon and a Tool, curated by Johanna Burton, New Museum, New York, NY, 2017[36]
  • Where did she go?, with Siera Hyte and Diamond Stingily, Holiday Forever, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, 2016[37]
  • Object Anthology, Publishing House, Gstaad, Switzerland, 2016[38]
  • Round 43: Small Business/Big Change: Economic Perspectives from Artists and Artrepreneurs, hosted by Martine Syms, Project Row Houses, Houston, TX, 2016[39]
  • Denude, Ramiken Crucible, New York, NY, 2015[40]
  • The End of Violent Crime, Queer Thoughts, New York, NY, 2015[41]
  • Small Pillow, Queer Thoughts at Arcadia Missa, London, UK, 2015[42]
  • Rainbow, Queer Thoughts, Nicaragua, 2015[43]
  • Forever in our Hearts, EGG, Chicago, IL, 2014[44]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Greenberger, Alex (June 17, 2016). "Going Natural: Diamond Stingily on Her Queer Thoughts Show". ARTnews. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  2. ^ "Meet The Artist Who Identifies with Medusa | Amuse". Amuse. May 11, 2016. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  3. ^ "Diamond Stingily – Rema Hort Mann Foundation". www.remahortmannfoundation.org. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  4. ^ Fateman, Johanna. "Diamond Stingily at Ramiken Crucible | New York". artforum.com. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  5. ^ Greenberger, Alex (June 17, 2016). "Going Natural: Diamond Stingily on Her Queer Thoughts, Show". ARTnews. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  6. ^ Loos, Ted (October 18, 2017). "At 44, a Paris Art Fair Is Gaining Even More Steam". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  7. ^ Sheets, Hilarie M. (September 15, 2017). "Gender-Fluid Artists Come Out of the Gray Zone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  8. ^ "Diamond Stingily". Alt Esc | Art Magazine & Curatorial Platform. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  9. ^ "Egg". eggg.co. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  10. ^ Russeth, Andrew (June 30, 2015). "Chicago's Queer Thoughts Gallery Heads to New York". ARTnews. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  11. ^ Greenberger, Alex (June 17, 2016). "Going Natural: Diamond Stingily on Her Queer Thoughts Show". ARTnews. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  12. ^ "Notes on Gesture | Video Data Bank". www.vdb.org. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  13. ^ "Queer Thoughts". queerthoughts.com. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  14. ^ "DOMINICA". dominicapublishing.com. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  15. ^ "Diamond Stingily". Alt Esc | Art Magazine & Curatorial Platform. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  16. ^ "Juliana Huxtable is Helping Art Regain Its Stride | artnet News". artnet News. May 19, 2017. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  17. ^ "Queer Thoughts". queerthoughts.com. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  18. ^ Greenberger, Alex (June 17, 2016). "Going Natural: Diamond Stingily on Her Queer Thoughts Show". ARTnews. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  19. ^ "- Diamond Stingily 2016". www.ramikencrucible.com. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  20. ^ "Diamond Stingily: 30 Under 35 | Cultured Magazine". www.culturedmag.com. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  21. ^ "Justin Allen, Rin Johnson, Diamond Stingily, Deborah Willis". artistsspace.org. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  22. ^ "Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon". www.newmuseum.org. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  23. ^ Sheets, Hilarie M. (September 15, 2017). "Gender-Fluid Artists Come Out of the Gray Zone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  24. ^ Loos, Ted (October 18, 2017). "At 44, a Paris Art Fair Is Gaining Even More Steam". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  25. ^ "- 2017 Diamond Stingily". www.ramikencrucible.com. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  26. ^ "Diamond Stingily". Forbes. Retrieved November 15, 2017.
  27. ^ "2018 Triennial: Songs for Sabotage". www.newmuseum.org. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  28. ^ "New York's New Museum Announces Lineup for 2018 Triennial | artnet News". artnet News. November 13, 2017. Retrieved November 14, 2017.
  29. ^ Adams, Susan. "From Karlie Kloss To Cotton Citizen To Beyoncé's Photographer: 30 Under 30 In Art & Style". Forbes. Retrieved November 15, 2017.
  30. ^ Fateman, Johanna. "Diamond Stingily at Ramiken Crucible | New York". artforum.com. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  31. ^ "KALEIDOSCOPE | Diamond Stingily". Kaleidoscope.media. April 21, 2017. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  32. ^ "Diamond Stingily". Freedman Fitzpatrick. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  33. ^ "- 2017 Diamond Stingily". www.ramikencrucible.com. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  34. ^ "- Diamond Stingily 2016". www.ramikencrucible.com. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  35. ^ "Queer Thoughts". queerthoughts.com. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  36. ^ "Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon". www.newmuseum.org. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  37. ^ "where did she go at holiday forever". holidayforever.org. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  38. ^ "anthologi". publishing-house.me. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  39. ^ "Round 43: Small Business / Big Change". Project Row Houses. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  40. ^ "- Denude images 2015". www.ramikencrucible.com. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  41. ^ "Queer Thoughts". queerthoughts.com. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  42. ^ "Queer Thoughts". queerthoughts.com. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  43. ^ "Queer Thoughts". queerthoughts.com. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
  44. ^ "Egg". eggg.co. Retrieved November 10, 2017.

External links[edit]