Diane Hendricks

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Diane Hendricks
Born Diane Marie Smith
1947 (age 69–70)
Wisconsin, United States
Residence Afton, Wisconsin, United States
Nationality American
Occupation Co-founder and chairperson, ABC Supply
Net worth $4.3 billion (January 2017)[1]
Spouse(s) Ken Hendricks (deceased)
Children 7

Diane Marie Hendricks (born 1947) is an American businesswoman and film producer from Wisconsin.[2] She is the widow of businessman Ken Hendricks.[2][1]

Early life[edit]

Hendricks was born and raised in Wisconsin,[1] the daughter of dairy farmers. She graduated from Osseo-Fairchild High School in 1965, and had been divorced from her first husband for ten years when she met Ken Hendricks.[3]

Career[edit]

In 1975, she was selling custom-built homes and Ken was a roofing contractor. They married and became business partners. In 1982, they used their lines of credit to secure a loan that enabled them to establish ABC Supply.[3] ABC Supply is privately held, and sells roofing, windows, gutters, and siding for residential and commercial buildings.

Diane Hendricks owns the Hendricks Holding Company, and is the owner and chairperson of ABC Supply.[2][4][5] In March 2012, Forbes estimated her net worth at US$2.8 billion;[4] Forbes estimated it at $4.3 billion as of January 2017.[1] [6] [7]

Philanthropy[edit]

She is a donor to WisconsinEye, and co-chair of Rock County 5.0, a five-year public/private initiative to advance Rock County’s economic development vision.[2][5] She has served on the boards of the Stateline Boys & Girls Club, Beloit Memorial Hospital, the Beloit Foundation, Forward Janesville, Kandu Industries, Blackhawk Bank, and the Hendricks Family Foundation. Hendricks serves on the Board of Trustees of Beloit College.[2]

Hollywood producer[edit]

She has produced movies, including The Stoning of Soraya M. (2008), about an execution in an Iranian village, An American Carol, (2008), and Snowmen, (2010).[5][8][9][10][11]

Political donations[edit]

She donated $500,000 to Governor Scott Walker's 2012 campaign to avoid recall, and was his biggest donor that year.[4] She also supports Paul Ryan.[5] In 2014, she donated $1 million to the Freedom Partners Action Fund, a pro-Republican Super PAC created by the Koch Brothers.[12] In both 2015 and 2016, she donated $2 million to Freedom Partners Action Fund.[13] In 2015, she gave $5 million to a PAC associated with presidential candidate Scott Walker, but has had $4 million refunded.[14]

In the 2016 U.S. presidential election, she gave over $5 million to the Reform America Fund, a super PAC which has opposed Hillary Clinton and supported Republican U.S. Senator from Wisconsin Ron Johnson.[15] Hendricks served as an economic advisor to Donald Trump's presidential campaign.[16][17]

Tax Controversies[edit]

A recent investigation by UrbanMilwaukee.com noted that while a Forbes article in 2010 stated she had a luxurious 10,000 SF mansion in the Town of Rock as well as being verified via a google maps search. The property tax listing has it has a 1663 SF frame residence.[18] It was discovered that access to the property was denied to the appraiser. The standard response, when unable to view a home, especially one on such a large lot of land would be to automatically increase the value. But the increase in value assumes only small improvements to a 1663 SF home, and not an all new construction of a 10,000 SF mansion.

Personal life[edit]

She has seven children and 17 grandchildren, and lives in Afton, Wisconsin.[2][1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Diane Hendricks Net Worth". CelebrityNetWorths. Retrieved January 19, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Our Team: Diane Hendricks". Hendricks Holding Co., Inc. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Zipkin (as told to), Amy (November 21, 2009). "The Business Must Go On". The New York Times. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Spivak, Cary (May 30, 2012). "Beloit billionaire pays zero in 2010 state income tax bill". Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Romell, Rick (December 25, 2010). "Widow a power in Beloit, beyond". Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  6. ^ Ten Questions For Diane Hendricks, Forbes, 11.04.10
  7. ^ "Diane Hendricks". Forbes. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  8. ^ "Diane Hendricks Producer". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  9. ^ Dickinson, Hilary (May 24, 2010). "Hollywood comes to Beloit". Beloit Daily News. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  10. ^ Holden, Stephen (June 25, 2009). "An Iranian Village Mob and a Wife’s Execution". The New York Times. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  11. ^ McCarthy, Todd (October 4, 2008). "An Iranian Village Mob and a Wife’s Execution". Variety. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  12. ^ Vogel, Kenneth; Allen, Mike (October 14, 2014). "Koch donors uncloaked". Politico. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Freedom Partners Action Fund Contributors, 2016 cycle". OpenSecrets. Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved 5 August 2016. 
  14. ^ "Million-Dollar Donors in the 2016 Presidential Race". The New York Times. February 9, 2016. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  15. ^ Bice, Daniel (October 25, 2016). "Bice: 5 donors pump $1.7 million into pro-Johnson PAC". Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. Retrieved 28 October 2016. 
  16. ^ Arnsdorf, Isaac (October 27, 2016). "Another super PAC spends millions against Clinton". Politico. Retrieved 28 October 2016. 
  17. ^ Titus, Elizabeth (August 16, 2016). "Trump adds Hendricks Scaramucci as Economic Policy Advisors". Bloomberg. Retrieved 24 January 2017. 
  18. ^ Horne, Michael. "Hendricks Not Paying Property Taxes?". Urban Milwaukee. Retrieved 2017-05-23. 

External links[edit]