Diane Schoemperlen

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Diane Mavis Schoemperlen (born July 9, 1954) is a Canadian novelist and short story writer.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Schoemperlen was born in Thunder Bay, Ontario, and educated at Lakehead University.

Career[edit]

Schoemperlen's first novel, In the Language of Love, was published in 1994; it is composed of one hundred chapters, each one based on one of the one hundred words in the Standard Word Association Test, which was used to measure sanity. There are chapters titled "Table," "Slow," "Cabbage," and "Scissors." New York Times reviewer Jay Parini pronounced Schoemperlen "a novelist of real promise".[2]

Schoemperlen's 1998 book of short stories, Forms of Devotion, won the Governor General's Award.[3][4] In her second novel, Our Lady of the Lost and Found (2001), the narrator is visited by the Virgin Mary, and the two women spend one week cooking, cleaning, and shopping.

Schoemperlen's 2017 book, This is Not My Life, tells of her love for a prison inmate.[3][5][6]

Bibliography[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'By the Book,' by Diane Schoemperlen". The New York Times, Dec 5, 2014. Mark Sarvas
  2. ^ "Pieces of a Life", New York Times, Feb 25, 1996, by Jay Parini
  3. ^ a b "‘I loved the wrong person’: Diane Schoemperlen on how she fell in love with a prison inmate". The Globe and Mail, Sarah Hampson, March 24, 2017
  4. ^ "Our Lady of the Lost and Found". Quill and Quire, March 2001 issue
  5. ^ "Review: This Is Not My Life: A Memoir of Love, Prison, and Other Complications". Quill and Quire, June 2016 issue
  6. ^ "My lover the convict: The allure of incarcerated men". McLeans, Anne Kingston, April 22, 2016

External links[edit]