Diastema

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Diastema
Brian diastema.png
Space between the two front teeth
Details
Identifiers
Latindiastema
MeSHD003970
TA98A05.1.03.078
TA2904
FMA77271
Anatomical terminology

A diastema (plural diastemata, from Greek διάστημα, space) is a space or gap between two teeth. Many species of mammals have diastemata as a normal feature, most commonly between the incisors and molars. More colloquially, the condition may be referred to as gap teeth or tooth gap.

In humans, the term is most commonly applied to an open space between the upper incisors (front teeth). It happens when there is an unequal relationship between the size of the teeth and the jaw. Diastemata are common for children and can exist in adult teeth as well. Diastemata are primarily caused by imbalance in the relationship between the jaw and the size of the teeth.

In humans[edit]

Causes[edit]

1. Oversized Labial Frenulum: Diastema is sometimes caused or exacerbated by the action of a labial frenulum (the tissue connecting the lip to the gum), causing high mucosal attachment and less attached keratinized tissue. This is more prone to recession or by tongue thrusting, which can push the teeth apart.[1]

2. Periodontal Disease: Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, can result in bone loss that supports the teeth. If a person loses enough bone, the teeth can become loose and cause gaps to form.[2]

3. Mesiodens: Mesiodens is an extra tooth that grows behind your front teeth. If you have a mesiodens, it may push the front teeth apart to make room for itself thus creating a gap between the front teeth.[3]

4. Skeletal discrepancy: Dental skeletal discrepancy can be a cause behind gap teeth. If the upper jaw grows more than the lower jaw, teeth on the upper jaw will have more space to cover thus leaving gaps between them.[4]

5. Proclination: If your front teeth are angled forward, a small gap between them may appear huge. This is called proclination. Proclination can be a result of aggressive tongue thrusting.[5]

Treatment[edit]

1. Determining the cause of the diastema, then treat the cause.

2. Diastema treatment options can differ from one patient to another, but generally it is treated by orthodontics,[6] or composite fillings, or a combination of veneers or crowns.

Historical and popular culture references[edit]

In The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote of the "gap-toothed wife of Bath".[7] As early as this time period, the gap between the front teeth, especially in women, was associated with lustful characteristics.[8] Thus, the implication in describing "the gap-toothed wife of Bath" is that she is a middle-aged woman with insatiable lust.[8] This has no scientific basis, but it has been a common premise in folklore since the Middle Ages.[citation needed]

In Ghana, Namibia, Nigeria as well as throughout many communities in Kenya, diastemata are regarded as being attractive and a sign of fertility, and some people have even had them created through cosmetic dentistry.[9][10] In France, they are called "dents du bonheur" ("lucky/happiness teeth").[11] This expression originated in Napoleon's time: when the Napoleonic army recruited, it was imperative that soldiers had incisors in perfect condition because they had to open the paper cartridges (containing powder and ball) with their teeth when loading their muskets. All those who had teeth apart were then classified as unfit to fight. Some men broke their own teeth to avoid going to war.[citation needed] Les Blank's Gap-Toothed Women (1987) is a 30-minute documentary film about diastematic women.[12]

Famous people[edit]

Actor Terry-Thomas was known for his 1⁄3-inch (8.5 mm) diastema.

Some well-known people noted for having diastema include:

Large diastemata between incisors, canines and molars of a normal horse

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diastema or Gaps Between Teeth: Causes and Solutions". Orthodontics Australia. 2020-06-29. Retrieved 2021-03-20.
  2. ^ "Diastema (Gap Between Teeth)". 2022-02-15.
  3. ^ Kumar, A.; Shetty, R. M.; Dixit, U.; Mallikarjun, K.; Kohli, A. (2022-02-15). "Orthodontic Management of Midline Diastema in Mixed Dentition". International Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry. 4 (1): 59–63. doi:10.5005/jp-journals-10005-1083. PMC 4999640. PMID 27616861.
  4. ^ Acacius, Hubris. "Gaps between Teeth, or Diastema: Causes and Treatment". SupreDent. Retrieved February 16, 2022.
  5. ^ "Direct Midline Diastema Closure with Composite Layering Technique: A One-Year Follow-Up". Case Reports in Dentistry. 2022-02-16. Retrieved 2022-02-16.
  6. ^ Wheeler, Bryan; K. Carrico, Caroline; Shroff, Bhavna; Brickhouse, Tegman; Laskin, Daniel (2017-11-01). "Management of the Maxillary Diastema by Various Dental Specialties". Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 76 (4): 709–715. doi:10.1016/j.joms.2017.11.024. PMID 29245001.
  7. ^ a b Rachel Dodes (September 8, 2010). "We Don't Mind the Gap: The Fashionable Flash a New Smile". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2010-09-10.
  8. ^ a b c d Garmaise, Ariella (2018-04-04). "Gap-Toothed Women". The McGill Tribune. Retrieved 2019-09-09.
  9. ^ a b "Midline diastemata in fashion". Bite magazine website. October 14, 2010. Archived from the original on April 20, 2012. Retrieved September 10, 2010.
  10. ^ a b c d Keller, Adrienne. "6 Fun Facts About Gaps Between Teeth". WebMD.
  11. ^ McGuiness, Romina (December 8, 2010). "The year of the gap-tooth trend". Metro. Archived from the original on March 8, 2012. Retrieved April 17, 2013.
  12. ^ Canby, Vincent (1987-09-16). "Film: 'Gap-Toothed Women,' 'Miss . . . or Myth?'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-09-09.
  13. ^ a b c d e Phinney, Donna J.; Halstead, Judy H. (2012). "Tooth Morphology". Dental Assisting: A Comprehensive Approach (Book Only) (4th ed.). Cengage Learning. p. 164. ISBN 978-1-285-40126-3.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Kapusevska, Biljana; Dereban, Nikola; Zabokova-Bilbilova, Efka; Popovska, Mirjana (2014). "The Influence of Etiological Factors in the Occurence [sic] of Diastema Mediana". Prilozi (Makedonska Akademija Na Naukite I Umetnostite. Oddelenie Za Medicinski Nauki). 35 (2): 169–177. doi:10.2478/prilozi-2014-0022. ISSN 1857-9345. PMID 25532099. S2CID 2791441.
  15. ^ a b c Dahl, Melissa (2010). "Top models need some space (between their teeth)". NBC News.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Evans, Dayna (2015). "Celebrity Diastemas, Ranked". Gawker.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "Celebrities With Gap Teeth". Ranker.
  18. ^ a b Saner, Emine (29 April 2019). "Wonky-teeth icons: the stars you should emulate, from Kate Moss to Madonna". the Guardian.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Shaw, Gabbi (2019). "11 celebrities that are known for their tooth gaps". Insider.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g "14 Celebs With Intoxicating Tooth Gaps". Cosmopolitan India. 2017.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Chack, Erin (2017). "18 Celebs Who Rock The Fuck Out Of A Tooth Gap". BuzzFeed.
  22. ^ Gary Hill. "Steve Howe". AllMusic. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  23. ^ Allen, Caroline (2019). "Gap toothed trend has led to an increase in reversed dental work". Yahoo News.
  24. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Gap-Toothed Women Movie Review (1988)". Roger Ebert. Retrieved 2019-09-09.
  25. ^ "Diastema (dentistry)". Factualworld. Retrieved 3 Apr 2014.
  26. ^ StreetJournal, Michael J. McCarthyStaff Reporter of The Wall (9 March 1999). "America Saw Itself in DiMaggio, A Hero Who Spanned Generations". Wall Street Journal. With a chipmunk face and gap-tooth smile, this "regular Joe" personified the American dream.
  27. ^ Cramer, Richard Ben (2001). Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life. Simon and Schuster. p. 382. ISBN 978-0-684-86547-8. Joe never got his buck teeth fixed until Skinny took care of it
  28. ^ Newsweek Staff (21 March 1999). "The Dimaggio Nobody Knew". Newsweek. He got his teeth fixed
  29. ^ "ESPN.com - Major League Baseball - DiMaggio book: Business and pleasure". www.espn.com.