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Dibromofluoromethane

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dibromofluoromethane
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Dibromo(fluoro)methane
Other names
Dibromofluoromethane
Fluorodibromomethane
R-12B2
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.148.872 Edit this at Wikidata
UNII
  • InChI=1S/CHBr2F/c2-1(3)4/h1H checkY
    Key: LTUTVFXOEGMHMP-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/CHBr2F/c2-1(3)4/h1H
  • C(F)(Br)Br
  • BrC(Br)F
Properties
CHBr2F
Molar mass 191.83 g/mol
Appearance Liquid
Density 2.421 g/cm3 at 20 °C
Melting point −78 °C (−108 °F; 195 K)
Boiling point 64.9 °C (148.8 °F; 338.0 K)
Insoluble
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS02: FlammableGHS06: ToxicGHS08: Health hazard
Supplementary data page
Dibromofluoromethane (data page)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Dibromofluoromethane is a mixed halomethane.[1] It is soluble in alcohol, acetone, benzene and chloroform. It is prepared from dibromomethane and antimony(III) fluoride.[2]

Applications[edit]

It can be used to prepare bromofluoromethane by reductive debromination with organotin hydride as tributyltin hydride.[3]

Regulations[edit]

Its ozone depletion potential (ODP) is 1.0 and it is included in list of Class I Ozone-Depleting Substances.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dibromofluoromethane solution". Sigma Aldrich. sigmaaldrich.com. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  2. ^ Bernd Baasner (2014), Houben-Weyl Methods of Organic Chemistry Vol. E 10a, 4th Edition Supplement Organo-Fluorine Compounds - Fluorinating Agents and Their Application in Organic Synthesis, Georg Thieme Verlag, p. 517, ISBN 978-3-13-181544-6
  3. ^ US patent 5189229A, Robinson, John M., "Debrominating dibromofluoromethane with tributyltin hydride", published 28 February 1989, issued 23 February 1993, assigned to Glaxo Group