Dibutylamine

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Dibutylamine[1]
Skeletal formula of dibutylamine
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
N-Butylbutan-1-amine
Other names
(Dibutyl)amine
Dibutylamine (deprecated)
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
506001
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.565
EC Number 203-921-8
MeSH dibutylamine
RTECS number HR7780000
UN number 2248
Properties
C8H19N
Molar mass 129.25 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Odor Fishy, ammoniacal
Density 767 mg mL−1
Melting point −61.90 °C; −79.42 °F; 211.25 K
Boiling point 137 to 177 °C; 278 to 350 °F; 410 to 450 K
4.7 g L−1
Vapor pressure 340 Pa
110 mol Pa−1 kg−1
-103.7·10−6 cm3/mol
1.417
Thermochemistry
292.9 J−1 K mol−1
−214.8–−209.8 kJ mol−1
−5.6534–−5.6490 MJ mol−1
Hazards
GHS pictograms The flame pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word WARNING
H226, H302, H312, H332
P280
Flash point 40 °C (104 °F; 313 K)
312 °C (594 °F; 585 K)
Explosive limits 1.1–10%
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
360 mg kg−1 (oral, rat)
Related compounds
Related amines
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Dibutylamine is an amine used as a corrosion inhibitor, in the manufacture of emulsifiers, and as a flotation agent. It is flammable and toxic.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 3–160, 5–54, 8–53, 8–112, 15–18, 16–27, ISBN 0-8493-0594-2 
  2. ^ Gangolli, S. (1999). The Dictionary of Substances and Their Effects. London: Royal Society of Chemistry. p. 204. Retrieved 2009-12-03.