Dichloramine-T

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Dichloramine-T
Dichloramine-T.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
N,N-Dichloro-4-methylbenzene-1-sulfonamide
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.006.786 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 207-462-4
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C7H7Cl2NO2S/c1-6-2-4-7(5-3-6)13(11,12)10(8)9/h2-5H,1H3
    Key: ARGDYOIRHYLIMT-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC1=CC=C(C=C1)S(=O)(=O)N(Cl)Cl
Properties
C7H7Cl2NO2S
Molar mass 240.10 g·mol−1
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS03: OxidizingGHS07: Exclamation mark
Danger
H271, H315, H319, H335
P210, P220, P221, P261, P264, P271, P280, P283, P302+P352, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P306+P360, P312, P321, P332+P313, P337+P313, P362, P370+P378, P371+P380+P375, P403+P233, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Dichloramine-T or N,N-Dichloro-p-toluenesulfonamide is a chemical used as a disinfectant starting at the beginning of the 20th century. The chemical contains toluene substituted by a sulfonamide grouping, which in turn has two chlorine atoms attached to the nitrogen.

Production[edit]

Dichloramine-T was first made by Frederick Daniel Chattaway in 1905.[1] Dichloramine-T can be made from para-toluenesulfonamide and bleaching powder, or chlorine.[2]

Properties[edit]

Dichloramine-T degrades with exposure to light or air.[3]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Chattaway, Frederick Daniel (1905). "XIX.—Nitrogen halogen derivatives of the sulphonamides". J. Chem. Soc., Trans. 87: 145–171. doi:10.1039/CT9058700145.
  2. ^ "Fibroid Disease of Bursae" (PDF). British Medical Journal: 867. 30 June 1917.
  3. ^ Kattamuri, Padmanabha V.; Li, Guigen (2013). "N,N-Dichloro-4-methylbenzenesulfonamide [Dichloramine-T]". Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis. doi:10.1002/047084289X.rn01485. ISBN 978-0471936237.