Dick Colman

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Dick Colman
Dick Colman.jpg
Sport(s)Football
Biographical details
Born(1914-11-11)November 11, 1914
New York, New York
DiedApril 5, 1982(1982-04-05) (aged 67)
Middlebury, Vermont
Playing career
1935–1936Williams
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1937–1944Williams (assistant)
1945–1956Princeton (assistant)
1957–1968Princeton
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1969–1977Middlebury
Head coaching record
Overall75–33
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
4 Ivy League (1957, 1963–1964, 1966)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1990 (profile)

Richard W. Colman Jr. (November 11, 1914 – April 5, 1982) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Princeton University from 1957 to 1968, compiling a record of 75–33. Colman had been the assistant to Princeton's previous coach, Charlie Caldwell; like Caldwell, Colman was known for his successful reliance on the single-wing formation offense, and ultimately he became the last major college coach to use the single wing, which Princeton gave up only after Colman's departure in 1969.[1]

After retiring from coaching, Colman was the athletic director at Middlebury College from 1969 to 1977.[1] Colman was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1990.

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Princeton Tigers (Ivy League) (1957–1968)
1957 Princeton 7–2 6–1 1st
1958 Princeton 6–3 5–2 T–2nd
1959 Princeton 4–5 3–4 T–5th
1960 Princeton 7–2 6–1 2nd
1961 Princeton 5–4 5–2 T–3rd
1962 Princeton 5–4 4–3 T–3rd
1963 Princeton 7–2 5–2 T–1st
1964 Princeton 9–0 7–0 1st 13
1965 Princeton 8–1 6–1 2nd
1966 Princeton 7–2 6–1 T–1st
1967 Princeton 6–3 4–3 T–4th
1968 Princeton 4–5 4–3 4th
Princeton: 75–33 61–23
Total: 75–33
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "DICK COLMAN, FORMER COACH". The New York Times. April 7, 1982. Retrieved August 5, 2010.

External links[edit]