Dick Hogan

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Dick Hogan
DickHogan.ShedNoTears.1948.jpg
Hogan in the 1948 film, Shed No Tears
Born Richard Hogan
(1917-11-27)November 27, 1917
Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
Died August 18, 1995(1995-08-18) (aged 77)
Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
Occupation Actor
Years active 1937–48

Dick Hogan (November 27, 1917 – August 18, 1995), sometimes credited as Richard Hogan, was an American actor of the 1930s and 1940s. During his twelve-year career he appeared in over three dozen films, in roles which varied from unnamed bellhops to featured and starring roles. His final film performance was as the murder victim in Alfred Hitchcock's treatise on thrill killing, Rope.

Life and career[edit]

Hogan was born in Little Rock, Arkansas on November 27, 1917. He entered the film industry at the age of nineteen, his first role in the small part of one of the young men in a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp in the 1937 drama Blazing Barriers.[1] His next film had him in the featured role of Bob D. Wilson in Annapolis Salute, directed by Christy Cabanne.[2] After small roles in Saturday's Heroes (1937),[3] and The Storm (1938),[4] he was again seen in a principal role in the 1938 John Ford comedy-drama, Submarine Patrol.[5] In 1939 he appeared in Charlie Chan in Reno (1939).[6]

The early 1940s had Hogan appearing in lead and featured roles in numerous films. In 1940, he was featured in The Marines Fly High (1940), starring Richard Dix and Lucille Ball, as one of Dix's company of marines.[7] He then appeared in Rancho Grande, in which he played a spoiled rich heir unhappy at having to live on his grandfather's ranch.[8][9] He also had a featured role later that year in One Crowded Night, starring Billie Seward and William Haade.[10] Hogan had a starring role in the 1940 western, Prairie Law, which also starred George O'Brien and Virginia Vale.[11] Hogan also had a featured role that year in the drama One Crowded Night.[12]

Hogan began 1941 as a bellhop in Play Girl, a romantic comedy starring Kay Francis,[13] and then appeared in a featured role in Pot o' Gold, a musical comedy starring James Stewart and Paulette Goddard. The film was remarkable, as it was the only film produced by James Roosevelt, the eldest son of Franklin D. Roosevelt.[14] In 1942 he appeared in several films in smaller roles, until late in the year when he had the featured role of Gibby Dapper in the Lew Landers' biopic, Smith of Minnesota (1942), about and starring the Heisman Trophy winner Bruce Smith,[15] after which Mug Town was released, in which Hogan starred along with the The Dead End Kids.[16] Mug Town was followed quickly with a leading role in the 1943 comedy-drama, Cinderella Swings It, the final film in the "Scattergood Baines" film series.[17][18]

After a small role in the spy film, They Came to Blow Up America, starring George Sanders,[19] Hogan had a featured role in the World War II drama, Action in the North Atlantic (1943), starring Humphrey Bogart.[20][21] His final screen performance of the year was in another World War II drama, this one set in the Pacific theater, So Proudly We Hail!, starring Claudette Colbert, Paulette Goddard (nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress), and Veronica Lake.[22]

In 1943 Hogan joined the U.S. Army Air Corps.[23] As part of a company of actors in the Corps, Hogan and his wife appeared in an Air Corps production titled, Winged Victory, written and directed by Moss Hart, which was a large hit on Broadway at the 44th Street Theatre, before touring the United States for two years.[24] Hogan, cast as Cpl. Richard Hogan, would also appear in George Cukor's film version of the same name. However, on Broadway he played the role of Frankie Davis one of the leads, while in the film he was cast as Jimmy Gardner.[25][26][27]

After leaving the service, Hogan returned to the film industry, but only for a short time. In 1947 he appeared in a featured role in Blaze of Noon, starring Anne Baxter and William Holden.[28] In 1948 he was featured in two more films: Beyond Glory, starring Alan Ladd and Donna Reed; and Shed No Tears, starring Wallace Ford and June Vincent.[29][30] Even though it was the first film he worked on in 1948, his final on-screen performance was in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope. In it, Hogan played the crucial role of David Kentley, the erstwhile friend who is strangled at the beginning of the picture and whose body is hidden in a chest while the murderers' guests have dinner in the same room.[31][32] Hogan's final acting appearance was on the Broadway stage, in the unsuccessful comedy, Time for Elizabeth, which ran for only 8 performances at the Fulton Theatre in September–October 1948.[33]

He retired from acting after the close of the play, and returned to his hometown of Little Rock, where he became an insurance agent.[34] He was known as an avid fan of Bing Crosby, and had a complete collection of all of Crosby's musical work.[35] Hogan died on August 18, 1995 at the age of 77 in Little Rock.

Filmography[edit]

(Per AFI database.)[36][37][38]

Year Title Role Notes
1937 Blazing Barriers CCC worker
1937 Annapolis Salute Bob D. Wilson
1937 Saturday's Heroes Freshman
1938 Rebellious Daughters Bill Evans
1938 Submarine Patrol Seaman Johnny Miller
1938 Storm, TheThe Storm Slim
1939 Sorority House Relief Squad Freshman Uncredited
1939 Charlie Chan in Reno Jack - college student Uncredited
1939 Five Came Back Larry
1939 5th Avenue Girl Skippy's Friend Uncredited
1939 Three Sons Freddie Pardway
1940 Marines Fly High, TheThe Marines Fly High Corporal Haines
1940 Rancho Grande Tom Dodge
1940 Prairie Law Billy
1940 Lucky Partners Bellboy Uncredited
1940 One Crowded Night Vince Sanders
1940 Mexican Spitfire Out West Bellhop Uncredited
1940 Fargo Kid, TheThe Fargo Kid Young prospector Uncredited
1941 Play Girl Bellhop Uncredited
1941 Pot o' Gold Willie McCorkle
1941 Harmon of Michigan Bonetti Uncredited
1941 Uncle Joe Bill Jones
1942 Gang Busters Announcer in Title Sequence Voice, Uncredited
1942 Ten Gentlemen from West Point Cadet Uncredited
1942 Tough As They Come Jim Bond Uncredited
1942 Rubber Racketeers Bert
1942 Orchestra Wives Teenager Unccredited
1942 Spirit of Stanford , TheThe Spirit of Stanford Student Uncredited
1942 Smith of Minnesota Gibby Dapper Uncredited
1942 Mummy's Tomb, TheThe Mummy's Tomb Boy Uncredited
1942 Army Surgeon Saunders Uncredited
1942 Mug Town Don Bell
1942 Thunder Birds Cadet
1943 Cinderella Swings It Tommy Stewart
1943 They Came to Blow Up America Coast Guardsman
1943 Action in the North Atlantic Cadet Robert Parker
1943 So Proudly We Hail! Flight Lieutenant Archie McGregor
1944 Winged Victory Jimmy Gardner Uncredited
1947 Blaze of Noon Sydney
1948 Shed No Tears Tom Grover
1948 Beyond Glory Cadet Sergeant Eddie Loughlin
1948 Rope David Kentley (final film role)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Blazing Barriers: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Reviews of the New Films: "Annapolis Salute"". The Film Daily. August 17, 1937. p. 4. Retrieved December 16, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ "Saturday's Heroes: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  4. ^ "The Storm: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Reviews: "Submarine Patrol"". The Film Daily. November 1, 1938. p. 6. Retrieved December 16, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ "Charlie Chan in Reno: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Marines Fly High: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Rancho Grande: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 18, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Reviews of the New Films: "Rancho Grande"". The Film Daily. March 25, 1940. p. 4. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ "Coast Studios to Start 11 Features This Week". The Film Daily. May 21, 1940. p. 2. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ "Reviews of New Films: "Prairie Law"". The Film Daily. June 27, 1940. p. 5. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ "Reviews: "One Crowded Night"". The Film Daily. August 16, 1940. p. 8. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  13. ^ "Play Girl: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Reviews of the New Films: "Pot O' Gold"". The Film Daily. April 4, 1941. p. 6. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ "Smith of Minnesota: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Reviews of the New Films: "Mug Town"". The Film Daily. January 25, 1943. p. 6. Retrieved December 16, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ "Cinderella Swings It: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  18. ^ "Reviews of the New Films: "Cinderella Swings It"". The Film Daily. January 21, 1943. p. 8. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  19. ^ "Reviews: "They Came to Blow Up America"". The Film Daily. April 23, 1943. p. 4. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  20. ^ "Action in the North Atlantic: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  21. ^ "Reviews: "Action in the North Atlantic"". The Film Daily. May 17, 1943. p. 6. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  22. ^ "Reviews: "So Proudly We Hail!"". The Film Daily. June 22, 1943. p. 8. Retrieved December 18, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  23. ^ Oldfield, Barney (February 28, 1943). "Theater Topics". The Nebraska State Journal. p. 30. Retrieved December 19, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  24. ^ "Winged Victory". Internet Broadway Database. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  25. ^ "Winged Victory". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  26. ^ "Winged Victory: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  27. ^ Gaver, Jack (December 4, 1943). "Big Town Medley". The Evening Review. East Liverpool, Ohio. p. 9. Retrieved December 19, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  28. ^ "Blaze of Noon: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  29. ^ "Beyond Glory: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  30. ^ "Shed No Tears: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  31. ^ "Outstanding Pictures of the Week". Statesville Daily Record. Statesville, NC. December 4, 1948. p. 17. Retrieved December 19, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  32. ^ "Film Daily Reviews of New Features: "Rope"". The Film Daily. August 26, 1948. p. 4. Retrieved December 16, 2015. open access publication – free to read
  33. ^ "Time for Elizabeth". Internet Broadway Database. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  34. ^ Brennan, Sandra. "Dick Hogan, Biography". AllMovie. Retrieved December 16, 2015. 
  35. ^ Carroll, Harrison (January 14, 1943). "Behind the Scenes in Holiday". The Evening Independent. Massillon, Ohio. p. 4. Retrieved December 19, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  36. ^ "Dick Hogan". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 19, 2015. 
  37. ^ "Richard Hogan". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 19, 2015. 
  38. ^ "Cpl. Richard Hogan". American Film Institute. Retrieved December 19, 2015. 

External links[edit]