Dick Stello

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dick Stello
Born Richard Jack Stello
(1934-07-20)July 20, 1934
Boston, Massachusetts
Died November 18, 1987(1987-11-18) (aged 53)
Lakeland, Florida
Occupation Umpire
Years active 1968−1987
Employer National League

Richard Jack "Dick" Stello (July 20, 1934 – November 18, 1987) was an American professional baseball umpire. He worked in the National League from 1968 to his death in 1987. He wore uniform number 18 for most of his career.

Early life[edit]

Stello was born in Boston and lived in an orphanage until age 12. At that point, he went to live with a foster family on a rural Massachusetts farm.[1] He was introduced to umpiring while in the military and he umpired local baseball for a year before attending an umpire school and graduating at the top of his class.[2]

Umpiring career[edit]

He umpired 2,764 major league games in his 20-year career. He umpired in two World Series (1975 and 1981), two All-Star Games (1977 and 1987) and five National League Championship Series (1971, 1976, 1979, 1983, and 1985).[3] Stello was an instructor at the Al Somers Umpire School.[4]

Personal life[edit]

He was married to stripper and actress Liliana Wilczkowska, better known as Chesty Morgan, from 1974 to a 1979 divorce. After the split, they stayed in touch until his death.[5]

Death[edit]

On November 18, 1987, Stello was stopped on the side of a two-lane highway and standing between his car and another car. A third car struck the parked cars from behind and Stello was crushed between them. He died instantly.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schnakenberg, Robert (July 7, 2010). "The Secret Lives of 8 Baseball Umpires". Mentalfloss.com. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  2. ^ Larson, Greg (March 15, 1973). "No Respect". Ocala Star-Banner. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  3. ^ Retrosheet
  4. ^ Willson, Brad (January 5, 1971). "88 Aspiring Umpires From 30 States Here For School". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  5. ^ Klinkenberg, Jeff (December 13, 2009). "Chesty Morgan: A life more than skin deep". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  6. ^ New York Times on Stello's death

External links[edit]