Dickson Iroegbu

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dickson Iroegbu
Born Mbaise, Imo state, Nigeria
Occupation Director, Producer

Dickson Nnamdi Iroegbu[1][2] is a Nigerian film director and producer. He has directed and produced several Nollywood hit movies. In 2005, at the maiden edition of the African Movie Academy Awards, Iroegbu won three awards for the movie The Mayors, including the awards for Best Picture, Best Screenplay and Best Director.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

Awards and nominations[edit]

African Movie Academy Awards:

  • 2005: Best Director (won)
  • 2005: Best Picture (won)
  • 2005: Best Screenplay (won)

Filmography[edit]

Year Film Credited as
Director Producer Writer
2001 Days of Glory[12] Yes Yes
2003 Romantic Attraction Yes
2004 The Mayors Yes Yes Yes
2004 Unfaithful Yes
2004 Little Angel Yes Yes
2004 Last Wedding Yes
2004 Burning Desire Yes
2004 Beyond Reason Yes
2005 Women's Cot Yes
2005 Kill the Bride Yes
2006 The Devil in Her Yes
2006 Last Kiss Yes
2006 Holy Cross Yes
2006 Enemies in Love Yes
2006 Different World Yes
2006 Holy Cross Yes
2007 To Love an Angel Yes
2007 The Trinity Yes
2007 Big Heart Treasure Yes
2008 Critical Condition Yes Yes

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Save Our Plateau - As healing metaphor for the generational change of a troubled nation". Vanguard. Lagos, Nigeria. 7 August 2010. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 
  2. ^ "Any Producer who Sleeps with an Actress Before Giving a Role Is a Weakling - Nollywood Director". AllAfrica.com. AllAfrica Global Media. 25 February 2006. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 
  3. ^ Amatus, Azuh; Okoye (Tessy). "Day I shot a movie in hell – Dickson Iroegbu". Daily Sun. Lagos, Nigeria. Retrieved 15 March 2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  4. ^ "AMAA Awards and Nominees 2005". Lagos, Nigeria: African Movie Academy Award. Archived from the original on 29 January 2013. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  5. ^ Krahe, Dialika (19 April 2010). "Tagelöhner des Ruhms". Der Spiegel (in German). Hamburg, Germany. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 
  6. ^ Njoku, Benjamin (18 December 2009). "Dickson Iroegbu Turns Preacher, Shaves 7- Year Old Dreadlock". AllAfrica.com. AllAfrica Global Media. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 
  7. ^ Krahe, Dialika (23 April 2010). "Nollywood's Film Industry Second only to Bollywood in Scale". Der Spiegel. Hamburg, Germany. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 
  8. ^ Ohai, Chux (10 July 2010). "I didn't divorce my wife – Dickson Iroegbu". The Punch. Lagos, Nigeria. Archived from the original on 15 July 2011. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 
  9. ^ Krahe, Dialika (26 April 2010). "Nollywood Lights Up Nigeria's Silver Screen". ABC News. New York City, New York, USA. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 
  10. ^ Ben-Nwankwo, ’Nonye (5 March 2011). "The Punch:: Faces behind hit movies". The Punch. Lagos, Nigeria. Retrieved 15 March 2011. [permanent dead link]
  11. ^ Popoola, Kazeem (28 August 2011). "Dickson Iroegbu …". National Mirror. Lagos, Nigeria. Retrieved 22 January 2013. [permanent dead link]
  12. ^ "Alex Osifo, Genevieve Nnaji - Friends Or Woes?". Vanguard. Lagos, Nigeria. 8 January 2010. Retrieved 15 March 2011. 

External links[edit]