Die defect

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A die defect is a unique and unintentional flaw in a coin die and is created through excessive use or polishing of the die.[1] A die bearing such a defect is occasionally referred to as a defective die. Generally, and depending upon the magnitude of the defect, coins that are produced from these dies are considered error coins.[2] Also, the term encompasses a wide variety of design errors that were engraved into the die originally and were slipped into circulation before the incorrect design was discovered.

Types[edit]

Die crack[edit]

A die crack occurs when a die, after being subjected to immense pressure during the minting process, cracks, causing a small gap in the die.[3] If this damaged die continues to produce coins, the metal will fill into the crack, thus revealing a raised line of metal in the finished coin. Specimens with more prominent die cracks can command a high premium and are valued greatly by some collectors.[4] However, less obvious errors are quite common, especially in the 50 States Commemorative Quarter Program, yielding a lower value.[5]

Cud[edit]

A cud is a variation of a die defect in which the coin bears a raised portion of metal. Unlike a die crack, this unintentional "bump" in the coin is caused by a dent or gouge in the die, therefore allowing the coin to fill into the gap during the minting process.[6] A very minuscule cud can look like a small chunk of metal that was somehow fused to the coin. Some numismatists disagree that these small disturbances, although produced in the same way as a cud, can qualify as one.[7] A prominent cud looks like a blank section of a coin, usually toward the rim of the coin.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "COIN COLLECTING TERMINOLOGY and Definitions – Glossary of Coin Collector Words Starting with Letter D." COIN COLLECTING TERMINOLOGY – Glossary of Coin Collector Terms and Definitions. Web. 23 April 2010. http://cointerms.com/glossary/d_definitions.htm.
  2. ^ "What's It Worth? Prices for U.S. Error Coins." CoinSite – Coin Collecting, Rare and Old Coins, Coin Prices and the Coin DOC. Web. 23 April 2010. http://www.coinsite.com/html/userrorprices.asp.
  3. ^ Headley, Susan. "Die Crack – What Is a Die Crack." Coins and Coin Collecting – Resources for All Types of Coins. Web. 24 April 2010. <http://coins.about.com/od/coinsglossary/g/diecrackdefined.htm>.
  4. ^ "State Quarter Errors: Wisconsin State Quarter Error,Off-Centered Strike, Etc." Rare Coin Values and Proven Trends: Smart Strategy for Buying Collectible Coins. Web. 24 April 2010. <http://www.us-coin-values-advisor.com/state-quarter-errors.html#Die_Cracks>.
  5. ^ "State Quarter Errors: Wisconsin State Quarter Error,Off-Centered Strike, Etc." Rare Coin Values and Proven Trends: Smart Strategy for Buying Collectible Coins. Web. 24 April 2010. <http://www.us-coin-values-advisor.com/state-quarter-errors.html#Die_Cracks>.
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 4 May 2010. Retrieved 23 April 2010.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ Headley, Susan. "The Difference Between the Rim and the Edge of a Coin." Coins and Coin Collecting – Resources for All Types of Coins. Web. 24 April 2010. <http://coins.about.com/b/2007/05/30/the-difference-between-the-rim-and-the-edge-of-a-coin.htm>.
  8. ^ "Find Out What a Cud Error on a Coin Really Looks Like".

External links[edit]