Diemech TP 100

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TP 100
Type Turboprop and turboshaft aircraft engine
National origin United States
Manufacturer Diemech Turbine Solutions

The Diemech TP 100 is an American turboprop and turboshaft aircraft engine under development by Diemech Turbine Solutions of DeLand, Florida.[1][2]

Design and development[edit]

The TP 100 was developed from an engine developed by PBS of the Czech Republic for use in UAVs. The design goal is to provide an engine that can run on globally available fuels, such as Jet-A or ultra-low-sulfur diesel, given the disappearance of avgas in most parts of the world.[1]

The TP 100 develops 241 hp (180 kW) and weighs 125 lb (57 kg) plus accessories.[1] The engine is expected to produce a specific fuel consumption of .82 lb/hp/hr (.5 kg/kw/h), yielding a cruise fuel flow of 21 U.S. gallons (79 L; 17 imp gal) per hour which is 52% more than the equivalent piston engine, the Lycoming IO-540, which produces the same power at a SFC of 0.45, burning 12.7 U.S. gallons (48 L; 10.6 imp gal) per hour. In examining these numbers AVweb editor Paul Bertorelli stated that this "illuminates the harsh fact that turbine engines just aren't as efficient as piston engines and the smaller the turbines are, the less efficient they are".[3]

The company plans to work with PBS to obtain Federal Aviation Administration certification in the US. The engine is expected to fly first in mid-2013 on a Van's Aircraft RV-10 testbed.[1]

Specifications (TP 100)[edit]

Data from AVweb[1]

General characteristics

  • Type: Turboprop and turboshaft
  • Length:
  • Diameter:
  • Dry weight: 125 lb (57 kg) without accessories

Components

  • Compressor:

Performance

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Bertorelli, Paul (26 March 2012). "Is There Room For A 240-HP Turbine?". AVweb. Retrieved 27 March 2012. 
  2. ^ Diemech Turbine Solutions (2010). "TP Turboprop 100". Retrieved 27 March 2012. 
  3. ^ Bertorelli, Paul (29 March 2012). "Sun 'n Fun: Redbird Flies". AVweb. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 

External links[edit]