Diethyl selenide

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Diethyl selenide
3D model of Diethyl selenide
skeletal model of Diethyl selenide
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
(Ethylselanyl)ethane
Other names
Ethyl selenide
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
UN number 2630
  • InChI=1S/C4H10Se/c1-3-5-4-2/h3-4H2,1-2H3
    Key: ALCDAWARCQFJBA-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC[Se]CC
Properties
C4H10Se
Molar mass 137.09 g/mol
Appearance colorless liquid
Density 1.232 g/ml
Melting point −87 °C (−125 °F; 186 K)
Boiling point 108 °C (226 °F; 381 K)
Hazards
Occupational safety and health (OHS/OSH):
Main hazards
Flammability, toxicity
GHS labelling:
GHS02: FlammableGHS06: ToxicGHS05: CorrosiveGHS09: Environmental hazardGHS08: Health hazard
Danger
H225, H301, H331, H373, H410
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P260, P261, P264, P270, P271, P273, P280, P301+P310, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P311, P314, P321, P330, P370+P378, P391, P403+P233, P403+P235, P405, P501
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
3
3
1
Flash point 22 °C (72 °F; 295 K)
Not available
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Diethyl selenide is an organoselenium compound with the formula C
4
H
10
Se
. First reported in 1836, it was the first organoselenium compound to be discovered.[1][2] It is the selenium analogue of diethyl ether. It has a strong and unpleasant smell.

Occurrence[edit]

Diethyl selenide has been detected in biofuel produced from plantain peel.[3] It is also a minor air pollutant in some areas.

Preparation[edit]

It may be prepared by a substitution reaction similar to the Williamson ether synthesis: reaction of a metal selenide, such as sodium selenide, with two equivalents of ethyl iodide or similar reagent to supply the ethyl groups:

Diethyl Selenide Prep.svg


References[edit]

  1. ^ Mukherjee, Anna J.; Zade, Sanjio S.; Singh, Harkesh B.; Sunoj, Raghavan B. (2010). "Organoselenium Chemistry: Role of Intramolecular Interactions". Chemical Reviews. 110 (7): 4357–4416. doi:10.1021/cr900352j. PMID 20384363.
  2. ^ Löwig, C. J. (1836). "Ueber schwefelwasserstoff—und selenwasserstoffäther" [About hydrogen sulfide and selenium hydrogen ether]. Annalen der Physik. 37: 550–553.
  3. ^ Efeovbokhan, Vincent E.; Akinneye, Damilola; Ayeni, Augustine O.; Omoleye, James A.; Bolade, Oladotun; Oni, Babalola A. "Experimental dataset investigating the effect of temperature in the presence or absence of catalysts on the pyrolysis of plantain and yam peels for bio-oil production". Data in Brief. Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.dib.2020.105804. PMC 7300137. PMID 32577450.