Diffuse alveolar damage

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Diffuse alveolar damage
Hyaline membranes - very high mag.jpg
Micrograph showing hyaline membranes, the key histologic feature of diffuse alveolar damage. H&E stain.
Classification and external resources

Diffuse alveolar damage is a histological pattern in lung disease. It is seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS),[1] transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP).

Cause[edit]

Diffuse alveolar damage is associated primarily with ARDS and TRALI in adults, and hyaline membrane disease in neonates. It is most commonly associated with infection.[2]

Prevalence[edit]

It is a common biopsy finding.[3] Through histology, diffuse alveolar damage goes through several stages:

  1. Exudative phase - similar to pulmonary edema. The alveoli become flooded with exudate
  2. Hyaline membrane production. Hyaline membranes are fibrinous structures resulting from organization of the exudate.
  3. Organising phase

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cotran, Ramzi S.; Kumar, Vinay; Fausto, Nelson; Nelso Fausto; Robbins, Stanley L.; Abbas, Abul K. (2005). Robbins and Cotran pathologic basis of disease. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier Saunders. p. 715. ISBN 0-7216-0187-1. 
  2. ^ Parambil JG, Myers JL, Aubry MC, Ryu JH (July 2007). "Causes and prognosis of diffuse alveolar damage diagnosed on surgical lung biopsy". Chest. 132 (1): 50–7. doi:10.1378/chest.07-0104. PMID 17475632. 
  3. ^ Parambil JG, Myers JL, Ryu JH (August 2006). "Diffuse alveolar damage: uncommon manifestation of pulmonary involvement in patients with connective tissue diseases". Chest. 130 (2): 553–8. doi:10.1378/chest.130.2.553. PMID 16899858. 

External links[edit]