Difluoromethane

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Difluoromethane
Stereo skeletal formula of difluoromethane with all explicit hydrogens added
Spacefill model of difluoromethane
Names
Systematic IUPAC name
Difluoromethane[1]
Other names
Carbon fluoride hydride

Methylene difluoride
Methylene fluoride

Freon-32
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
Abbreviations HFC-32

R-32
FC-32

1730795
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.764
EC Number 200-839-4
259463
MeSH Difluoromethane
RTECS number PA8537500
UNII
UN number 3252
Properties
CH2F2
Molar mass 52.02 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless gas
Density 1.1 g cm−3
Melting point −136 °C (−213 °F; 137 K)
Boiling point −52 °C (−62 °F; 221 K)
log P -0.611
Vapor pressure 1518.92 kPa (at 21.1 °C)
Hazards
Safety data sheet See: data page
MSDS at Oxford University
R-phrases (outdated) R11
S-phrases (outdated) S9, S16, S33
NFPA 704
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g., canola oilHealth code 1: Exposure would cause irritation but only minor residual injury. E.g., turpentineReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
1
1
0
648 °C (1,198 °F; 921 K)
Supplementary data page
Refractive index (n),
Dielectric constantr), etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
solid–liquid–gas
UV, IR, NMR, MS
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is ☑Y☒N ?)
Infobox references

Difluoromethane, also called HFC-32 or R-32, is an organic compound of the dihalogenoalkane variety. It has the formula of CH2F2.

Uses[edit]

Difluoromethane is a molecule used as refrigerant that has zero ozone depletion potential (ODP) [2], a global warming potential (GWP) index 675 times that of carbon dioxide, based on a 100-year time frame [3], and it is classified as A2L - slightly flammable by ASHRAE.[4]

Difluoromethane has excellent heat transfer and pressure drop performance both in condensation and vaporisation. Therefore, in spite of its mild flammability, it seems to be a very promising low GWP substitute for traditional HFC refrigerants. [5]


Difluoromethane in a zeotropic (50/50 mass%) mixture with pentafluoroethane (R-125) is known as R-410A, a common replacement for various chlorofluorocarbons (aka Freon) in new refrigerant systems, especially for air-conditioning. The zeotropic mix of difluoromethane with pentafluoroethane (R-125) and tetrafluoroethane (R-134a) is known as R-407A through R-407E depending on the composition. Likewise the azeotropic (48.2/51.8 mass%) mixture with chlorotrifluoromethane (R13).

Difluoromethane is currently used in residential and commercial air-conditioners in Japan, China, and India as substitute for R-410A. In order to reduce the residual risk associated with its mild flammability, this molecule should be applied in heat transfer equipment with low refrigerant charge such as brazed plate heat exchangers (BPHE), or shell and tube heat exchangers and tube and plate heat exchangers with tube of small diameter [6]. Many applications confirmed that difluoromethane exhibits heat transfer coefficients higher than those of R-410A under the same operating conditions but also higher frictional pressure drops [7].

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Difluoromethane - Compound Summary". The PubChem Project. USA: National Center of Biotechnological Information.
  2. ^ http://www.linde-gas.com/en/products_and_supply/refrigerants/hfc_refrigerants/r32/index.html
  3. ^ May 2010 TEAP XXI/9 Task Force Report
  4. ^ 2009 ASHRAE Handbook
  5. ^ https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrefrig.2015.04.017
  6. ^ https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrefrig.2015.09.002
  7. ^ https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrefrig.2015.09.002

External links[edit]