Digital Signature and Electronic Authentication Law

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Digital Signature And Electronic Authentication Law (SEAL) of 1998 was introduced to the United States Senate, as S.1594, and was followed closely by H.R. 3472 which was introduced to the House of Representatives. This Bill sought to update the Bank Protection Act of 1968 in regards to electronic authentication techniques by financial institutions, and for other purposes.[1]

Sections from the law[edit]

The definition of electronic document described in Sec 3(f) of the SEAL
[2]
(f) DOCUMENT- The term `document' means any message, instrument, information, data, image, text, program, software, database, or the similar item, regardless of how created, if such item can be retrieved or displayed in a tangible form.
Electronic authentication technologies are compliant with Sec 3(g)
(g) ELECTRONIC AUTHENTICATION- The term `electronic authentication' means a crystallographic or other secure electronic technique that allows the user of the technique

(1) to authenticate the identity of or information associated with a sender of a document

(2) to determine that a document was not altered, changed, or modified during its transmission to a recipient, or

(3) to verify that a document received was sent by the identified party claiming to be the sender.

Section 6 of the Digital Signature And Electronic Authentication Law (SEAL) states the electronic authentication may be used if an agreement to use them was made by all parties.
(a) ELECTRONIC AUTHENTICATION OF DOCUMENTS, INFORMATION, AND IDENTITY-
(1) IN GENERAL- A financial institution may use electronic authentication in the conduct of its business if it has entered into an agreement regarding the use of electronic authentication with any counterpart, or if it has established a banking, financial, or transnational system using electronic authentication.
  • DURING MEDICAL RIDE, A PATIENT WAS PLACED IN A GURNEY TO RECEIVE EMERGENCY CARE WHEN THE RESPONDENT/EMPLOYEE ASKED SOME QUESTIONS ABOUT THE TRANSPORTABLE PERSON/PATIENT

THE RESPONDENT/EMPLOYEE HANDED A CLIP BOARD OVER TO THE PERSON/PATIENT IN TRANSIT AND THE PATIENT ABOARD GAVE ELECTRONIC CONSENT(ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE)*



This law of "electric" meets "signature" is confined to an appointed committee- who are unequally yoked to their own communities. HOSPITAL RECORDS MAY RECEIVE AN IMMIGRANT FOR TRANSFER TO AND FROM ANOTHER HOSPITAL REGION; FOR PURPOSES NOT REGARDED TO THE PATIENT; IN TERMS OF COMPLIANCE OR FORCEFUL COMPLIANCE ONTO A PATIENT TO GAIN A PERSONAL OUTCOME TO THE FAMILY/ADOPTION; (EX: "A WOMAN CALLS FOR AN AMBULANCE[911] AFTER AN EMERGENCY SITUATION CONCERNING THAT SHE MAY HAVE HAD A MISCARRIAGE. ACCORDANCE(S) NOT EQUIVOCAL TO ANY EMERGENCY/911 PATIENT WHO IS TAKEN OUT OF HOME

Forms of electronic authentication[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Digital Signature And Electronic Authentication Law (SEAL) of 1998
  2. ^ Cite error: The named reference Ibo was invoked but never defined (see the help page).

External links[edit]