The Digital Imprimatur

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The Digital Imprimatur: How big brother and big media can put the Internet genie back in the bottle is an article about Internet censorship written in 2003 by John Walker, the co-founder of computer-aided design software company Autodesk. It was published in the magazine Knowledge, Technology & Policy.[1]

In the article, Walker argues that there is increasingly pressure limiting the ability for Internet users to voice their ideas, as well as predicting further Internet censorship. Walker claims that the most likely candidate to usher what he calls "the digital imprimatur" is digital rights management, or DRM.[1][2][3]

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  1. ^ a b John Walker (2003), "The Digital Imprimatur: How big brother and big media can put the Internet genie back in the bottle", Knowledge, Technology & Policy, Volume 16, Issue 3 (Fall 2003), Springer, pages 24-77, ISSN 0897-1986 (print), ISSN 1874-6314 (online), doi: 10.1007/s12130-003-1032-6. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  2. ^ "Digital Imprimatur in a Nutshell", Donna Wentworth and Fred von Lohmann, Electronic Frontier Foundation. Retrieved 7 April 2004.
  3. ^ "The digital imprimatur and the right to read", M. Kathleen Milberry, Geeks & Global Justice, 23 April 2008. Retrieved 12 August 2014.