Dileep Jhaveri

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Dileep Jhaveri
Native name
દિલીપ મનુભાઈ ઝવેરી
BornDileep Manubhai Jhaveri
(1943-04-03) 3 April 1943 (age 76)
Mumbai, India
OccupationPoet, playwright, translator, editor, physician
LanguageGujarati
NationalityIndian
EducationMBBS
Alma materSavitribai Phule Pune University
Notable awards
  • Critics Award (1989)
  • Jayant Pathak Poetry Award (1989)

Dileep Manubhai Jhaveri (Gujarati: દિલીપ મનુભાઈ ઝવેરી) is a Gujarati language poet, translator, playwright, editor and physician from Mumbai, India.

Life[edit]

He was born on 3 April 1943 in Mumbai, India[1] to Manubhai Jhaveri. He is a general physician by profession. He serves on the editorial board of Kobita Review, a Kolkata-based bilingual (Bengali and English) journal, and is Muse India's contributing editor for Gujarati language.[2]

Works[edit]

He published a collection of Gujarati poetry entitled Pandukavyo ane Itar in 1989, followed by Khandit Kand ane Pachhi (2014) and Kavita Vishe Kavita (2017). Vyasochchvas (2003) is a play written by him, which was subsequently been translated into English as A Breath of Vyas by Kamal Sanyal. Many of his poems have been anthologised, and been translated into English, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Bengali, Korean, Chinese, Japanese and Irish. He has edited an anthology of contemporary Gujarati poetry in English translation as Breath Becoming a Word.[2] The eminent poet Gabriel Rosenstock has translated his works into Irish.[3][4]

Recognition[edit]

His received the Critics Award in 1989, the Jayant Pathak Poetry Award in 1989 and the Gujarati Sahitya Parishad award in 1990. He was invited to the Asian Poets Conference in Korea in 1986 and Taiwan in 1995, he has also recited his poems in Japan, Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and the USA.[5][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Who's Who of Indian Writers". Sahitya Akademi. Retrieved 4 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Dileep Jhaveri (poet) - India". Poetry International. 1 May 2010. Retrieved 4 August 2017.
  3. ^ "Welcome to Muse India". Muse India. ISSN 0975-1815. Retrieved 4 August 2017.
  4. ^ a b Kartik Chandra Dutt (1999). Who's who of Indian Writers, 1999: A-M. New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi. p. 519. ISBN 978-81-260-0873-5. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  5. ^ "Dileep Jhaveri - Ποιειν Και Πραττειν". create and do. Retrieved 4 August 2017.

External links[edit]