Dimefox

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Dimefox
Dimefox-3D-balls-by-AHRLS-2012.png
Dimefox.svg
Names
IUPAC name
N-[dimethylamino(fluoro)phosphoryl]-N-methylmethanamine
Other names
tetramethylphosphorodiamidic fluoride bis(dimethylamino)fluorophosphine oxide bis(dimethylamido)phosphoryl fluoride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.706
KEGG
Properties
C4H12FN2OP
Molar mass 154.13 g·mol−1
Appearance colourless liquid
Density 1.11 g·mL–1
1000000 mg·L–1
Vapor pressure 14663 mPa
2.28·10–8 atm·m3·mol–1[1]
Pharmacology
inhalation and dermal contact
Legal status
  • UK: Banned
  • US: Banned
Hazards
Main hazards Corrosive (C), Highly Toxic (T+)
Corrosive C Dangerous for the Environment (Nature) N Toxic T
R-phrases (outdated) R26/27/28
S-phrases (outdated) S1/2, S23, S28, S36/37, S38, S45
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
<2mg Oral
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Dimefox was an organophosphate pesticide. In its pure form it is a colourless liquid with a fishy odour.[2] Dimefox was first produced in 1940 by the group of Gerhard Schrader in Germany. It was historically used as a pesticide, but has been deemed obsolete or discontinued for use by the World Health Organisation. However, they do not guarantee that all commercial use of this compound ceased. But in most countries it is no longer registered for use as a pesticide.[3] It is considered an extremely hazardous substance as defined by the United States Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/summary/summary.cgi?cid=8264
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-22. Retrieved 2011-04-06.
  3. ^ the WHO recommended classification of pesticides by hazard and guidelines to classification 2009, http://www.who.int/ipcs/publications/pesticides_hazard_2009.pdf