Dimethyl phthalate

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Dimethyl phthalate[1][2]pl
Dmp.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Dimethyl benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate
Other names
Dimethyl phthalate
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.004.557
KEGG
UNII
Properties
C10H10O4
Molar mass 194.184 g/mol
Appearance Colorless oily liquid
Odor slight aromatic odor[2]
Density 1.19 g/cm3
Melting point 2 °C (36 °F; 275 K)
Boiling point 283 to 284 °C (541 to 543 °F; 556 to 557 K)
0.4% (20°C)[2]
Vapor pressure 0.01 mmHg (20°C)[2]
Pharmacology
P03BX02 (WHO) QP53GX02 (WHO)
Hazards
Flash point 146 °C (295 °F; 419 K)
460 °C (860 °F; 733 K)
Explosive limits 0.9%-?[2]
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
6900 mg/kg (rat, oral)
1000 mg/kg (rabbit, oral)
2400 mg/kg (guinea pig, oral)
6800 mg/kg (rat, oral)
6800 mg/kg (mouse, oral)
4400 mg/kg (rabbit, oral)
2400 mg/kg (guinea pig, oral)[3]
9630 mg/m3[3]
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 5 mg/m3[2]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 5 mg/m3[2]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
2000 mg/m3[2]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Dimethyl phthalate is a organic compound with molecular formula (C2H3O2)2C6H4. The methyl ester of phthalic acid, it is a colorless liquid that is soluble in organic solvents.

Dimethyl phthalate is used as an insect repellent for mosquitoes and flies. It is also an ectoparasiticide and has many other uses, including in solid rocket propellants, and plastics. Its LD50 is 8 200 mg/kg (rats, oral).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dimethyl phthlate at chemicalland21.com
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0228". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  3. ^ a b "Dimethylphthalate". Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  4. ^ Robert L. Metcalf “Insect Control” in Ullmann’s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry” Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2002. doi:10.1002/14356007.a14_263