Dimethylcarbamoyl fluoride

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Dimethylcarbamoyl fluoride
Dimethylcarbamoyl fluoride.svg
Names
IUPAC name
Dimethylcarbamic fluoride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
Properties
C3H6FNO
Molar mass 91.085 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Soluble
Hazards
Main hazards Highly toxic
Related compounds
Related compounds
Dimethylcarbamoyl chloride
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Dimethylcarbamoyl fluoride is a chemical compound that can be produced by fluorinating the dimethylcarbamoyl chloride with potassium fluoride.[1] It's a colorless liquid that is soluble and stable in water.[2][3]

Dimethylcarbamoyl fluoride is highly toxic because it's a potent cholinesterase inhibitor and is lethal even at low doses.[2][3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cuomo, John; Olofson, R. A. (March 1979). "Efficient and convenient synthesis of fluoroformates and carbamoyl fluorides". The Journal of Organic Chemistry. 44 (6): 1016–1017. doi:10.1021/jo01320a034.
  2. ^ a b Augustinsson, K.B.; Casida, J.E. (December 1959). "Enzymic hydrolysis of N:N-dimethylcarbamoyl fluoride". Biochemical Pharmacology. 3 (1): 60–67. doi:10.1016/0006-2952(59)90009-7.
  3. ^ a b MYERS, DK (April 1956). "Studies on cholinesterase. 10. Return of cholinesterase activity in the rat after inhibition by carbamoyl fluorides". The Biochemical Journal. 62 (4): 556–63. doi:10.1042/bj0620556. PMC 1215962. PMID 13315214.