Diminazene

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Diminazene
Diminazene.svg
Ball-and-stick model of diminazen
Clinical data
Trade names Azidin, Berenil, Ganasag, Pirocide
Routes of
administration
IM, SC
ATCvet code
Legal status
Legal status
  • Veterinary use only
Identifiers
Synonyms 4,4'-(1-Triazene-1,3-diyl)bis(benzenecarboximidamide)
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.007.860
Chemical and physical data
Formula C14H15N7
Molar mass 281.316 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)

Diminazene (INN; also known as diminazen) is an anti-infective medication for animals that is sold under a variety of brand names (see drugbox). It is effective against certain protozoa such as Babesia, Trypanosoma and Cytauxzoon. The drug may also be effective against certain bacteria including Brucella and Streptococcus.[1][2]

Chemically it is a di-amidine, and it is used in form of the aceturate (N-acetylglycinate).

The mechanism is not well understood; it probably inhibits DNA replication,[1] but also has affinity to RNA.

Side effects[edit]

Acute side effects include vomiting, diarrhoea and hypotension (low blood pressure). Diminazen can harm the liver, kidneys and brain, which is potentially life-threatening; especially camels are susceptible to these effects.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Peregrine, A. S.; Mamman, M. (1993). "Pharmacology of diminazene: A review". Acta tropica. 54 (3–4): 185–203. doi:10.1016/0001-706X(93)90092-P. PMID 7902657. 
  2. ^ Mungube, E. O.; Vitouley, H. S.; Allegye-Cudjoe, E.; Diall, O.; Boucoum, Z.; Diarra, B.; Sanogo, Y.; Randolph, T.; Bauer, B.; Zessin, K. H.; Clausen, P. H. (2012). "Detection of multiple drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of south-east Mali". Parasites & Vectors. 5: 155. doi:10.1186/1756-3305-5-155. PMC 3432589Freely accessible. PMID 22852796.