Dinesh Gunawardena

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Honourable
Dinesh Gunawardena
MP
Minister of Transport[a]
In office
October 2000 – December 2001
Succeeded by Gamini Atukorale
Minister of Urban Development and Water Supply[b]
In office
April 2004 – April 2010
Minister of Water Supply and Drainage
In office
April 2010 – 12 January 2015
Preceded by A. L. M. Athaullah
Succeeded by Rauff Hakeem
Chief Government Whip
In office
17 June 2008 – 20 January 2015
Preceded by Jeyaraj Fernandopulle
Succeeded by Gayantha Karunathilaka
Deputy Minister of Education
In office
April 2004 – January 2007
Succeeded by M. Satchithanandan
Member of the Sri Lankan Parliament
for Maharagama
In office
1983–1989
Preceded by Premarathne Gunasekera
Member of the Sri Lankan Parliament
for Colombo District
Assumed office
2000
In office
1989–1994
Personal details
Born (1949-03-02) 2 March 1949 (age 68)
Political party Mahajana Eksath Peramuna
Other political
affiliations
United People's Freedom Alliance
Alma mater University of Oregon
Occupation Trade unionist
Religion Buddhist
Ethnicity Sinhalese
  1. ^ Minister of Transport and Environment from September 2001 to December 2001.
  2. ^ Minister of Urban Development and Sacred Area Development from January 2007 to April 2010.

Dinesh Chandra Rupasinghe Gunawardena (born 2 March 1949) is a Sri Lankan politician, Member of Parliament and former cabinet minister. He is the current leader of the Mahajana Eksath Peramuna (MEP), a member of the United People's Freedom Alliance (UPFA).

Early life and family[edit]

Gunawardena was born 2 March 1949.[1][2] He is the son of Philip Gunawardena and Kusuma Amarasinha.[2][3] He was educated at Royal College, Colombo.[4][5] After school he joined the Netherlands School of Business, graduating with a diploma in business management.[2][3] He then joined the University of Oregon, graduating with a B.B.A. degree in international business.[2][3] Whilst in the USA he became involved in student activism, taking part in Anti-Vietnam War protests.[2]

Gunawardena married Ramani Wathsala Kotelawela.[6][7] They had one son (Yadamini) and one daughter (Sankapali).[3][7] Ramani died of undiagnosed hepatitis in the mid 1980s.[6]

Career[edit]

After university Gunawardena worked in New York City but in 1972 his father died and Gunawardena returned to Sri Lanka.[3] He was appointed to the Mahajana Eksath Peramuna's (MEP) central committee in August 1973.[2] He became general-secretary of the MEP in 1974.[2]

Gunawardena was the MEP's candidate in Avissawella at the 1977 parliamentary election but failed to get elected.[8] He was the MEP's candidate in Maharagama at the 1983 by-election. He won the election and entered Parliament.[9] Gunawardena contested the 1989 parliamentary election as one of the MEP's candidates in Colombo District. He was elected and re-entered Parliament.[10] He was one of the MEP's candidates in Colombo District at the 1994 parliamentary election but the MEP failed to win any seats in Parliament.

On 27 August 2000 the MEP joined the People's Alliance (PA).[11] Gunawardena contested the 2000 parliamentary election as one of the PA's candidates in Colombo District. He was elected and re-entered Parliament.[12] He was appointed Minister of Transport after the election.[13] He was given the additional portfolio of Environment in September 2001.[14] He was re-elected at the 2001 parliamentary election.[15] On 20 January 2004 the Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) and the Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna (JVP) formed the United People's Freedom Alliance (UPFA).[16] The MEP joined the UPFA on 2 February 2004.[17] Gunawardena contested the 2004 parliamentary election as one of the UPFA's candidates in Colombo District. He was elected and re-entered Parliament.[18] He was appointed Minister of Urban Development and Water Supply and Deputy Minister of Education after the election.[19][20] In January 2007 his cabinet portfolio was changed to Minister of Urban Development and Sacred Area Development but he lost his deputy ministerial position.[21][22] He was appointed Chief Government Whip in June 2008.[23]

Gunawardena was re-elected at the 2010 parliamentary election.[24] He was appointed Minister of Water Supply and Drainage after the election.[25][26] He lost his cabinet position following the 2015 presidential election. He was re-elected at the 2015 parliamentary election.[27][28] In March 2017 he was suspended from parliamentary sittings for one week due to repeatedly disrupting proceedings.[29]

Electoral history[edit]

Electoral history of Dinesh Gunawardena
Election Constituency Party Votes Result
1977 parliamentary[8] Avissawella MEP 17,897 Not elected
1983 parliamentary by[9] Maharagama MEP 27,054 Elected
1989 parliamentary[10] Colombo District MEP 70,616 Elected
1994 parliamentary Colombo District MEP Not elected
2000 parliamentary[12] Colombo District PA 114,795 Elected
2001 parliamentary[15] Colombo District PA 87,615 Elected
2004 parliamentary[18] Colombo District UPFA 82,626 Elected
2010 parliamentary[24] Colombo District UPFA 116,860 Elected
2015 parliamentary[30] Colombo District UPFA 124,451 Elected

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Directory of Members: Dinesh Gunawardena". Parliament of Sri Lanka. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g de Silva, W. P. P.; Ferdinando, T. C. L. 9th Parliament of Sri Lanka (PDF). Associated Newspapers of Ceylon Limited. p. 233. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Singaravelu, Ananda Nihal (2 March 2009). "Dinesh Turns Three-Score". Daily News (Sri Lanka). 
  4. ^ "Royal College honours old Royalists in Parliament". Daily News (Sri Lanka). 11 February 2002. 
  5. ^ "Ranil's third stint as PM". Sunday Observer (Sri Lanka). 11 January 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Peiris, Roshan (2 April 2000). "The Boralugoda 'cub'". The Sunday Times (Sri Lanka). 
  7. ^ a b "Minister Dinesh Gunawardena on 'Celeb Chat'". The Nation (Sri Lanka). 31 July 2011. 
  8. ^ a b "Result of Parliamentary General Election 1977" (PDF). Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. [permanent dead link]
  9. ^ a b "Results of the Parliamentary By-Elections Held Between 1947-1988" (PDF). Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. [permanent dead link]
  10. ^ a b "Result of Parliamentary General Election 1989" (PDF). Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. [permanent dead link]
  11. ^ "PA aligns with hard-line Sinhala party". TamilNet. 27 August 2000. 
  12. ^ a b "Parliamentary General Election 10.10.2000 - Trincomalee District". Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. 
  13. ^ "SLMC, EPDP get plum portfolios". TamilNet. 19 October 2000. 
  14. ^ Weerawarne, Sumadhu (15 September 2001). "18 member Cabinet sworn in yesterday". The Island (Sri Lanka). 
  15. ^ a b "General Election 2001 Preferences" (PDF). Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-08-09. 
  16. ^ "SLFP-JVP alliance signed in Colombo". TamilNet. 20 January 2004. 
  17. ^ "Four Party Leaders sign pact with JVP-SLFP alliance". TamilNet. 2 February 2004. 
  18. ^ a b "General Election 2004 Preferences" (PDF). Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. [permanent dead link]
  19. ^ "PART I : SECTION (I) — GENERAL Appointments & c., by the President" (PDF). The Gazette of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka Extraordinary. 1335/24. 10 April 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 December 2014. 
  20. ^ "The new UPFA Cabinet". The Sunday Times (Sri Lanka). 11 April 2004. 
  21. ^ "PART I : SECTION (I) — GENERAL Appointments & c., by the President" (PDF). The Gazette of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka Extraordinary. 1482/08. 29 January 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 February 2014. 
  22. ^ "The New Cabinet". The Island (Sri Lanka). 29 January 2007. 
  23. ^ "Chief Government Whips". Parliament of Sri Lanka. 
  24. ^ a b "Parliamentary General Election - 2010 Colombo Preferences" (PDF). Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. [permanent dead link]
  25. ^ "PART I : SECTION (I) — GENERAL Appointments & c., by the President" (PDF). The Gazette of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka Extraordinary. 1651/3. 26 April 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 May 2010. 
  26. ^ "New Cabinet Ministers & Deputy Ministers". Daily News (Sri Lanka). 24 April 2010. 
  27. ^ "PART I : SECTION (I) — GENERAL Government Notifications PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS ACT, No. 1 OF 1981" (PDF). The Gazette of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka Extraordinary. 1928/03. 19 August 2015. [permanent dead link]
  28. ^ "Ranil tops with over 500,000 votes in Colombo". The Daily Mirror (Sri Lanka). 19 August 2015. 
  29. ^ "Dinesh Gunawardena suspended from Parliament for a week for unruly behavior". Retrieved 9 March 2017. 
  30. ^ Jayakody, Pradeep (28 August 2015). "The Comparison of Preferential Votes in 2015 & 2010". The Daily Mirror (Sri Lanka).