Ding Guangen

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Ding Guangen
丁关根
Head of Propaganda Department of the Communist Party of China
In office
September 1992 – November 2002
General Secretary Jiang Zemin
Preceded by Wang Renzhi
Succeeded by Liu Yunshan
Head of the United Front Work Department of the CPC Central Committee
In office
November 1990 – December 1992
General Secretary Jiang Zemin
Preceded by Yan Mingfu
Succeeded by Wang Zhaoguo
Chairman of the Central Guidance Commission for Building Spiritual Civilization
In office
April 1997 – November 2002
Succeeded by Li Changchun
Minister of Railways of the People's Republic of China
In office
1985 – 12 March 1998
Premier Zhao Ziyang
Li Peng
Preceded by Chen Puru
Succeeded by Li Senmao
Personal details
Born September 1929
Wuxi, Jiangsu, China
Died July 22, 2012(2012-07-22) (aged 82)
Beijing
Political party Communist Party of China
Alma mater Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Ding Guangen
Traditional Chinese 丁關根
Simplified Chinese 丁关根

Ding Guangen (Chinese: 丁关根; September 1929 – July 22, 2012) was a Chinese politician who served in senior leadership roles in the Communist Party of China during the 1990s. He was a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China between 1992 and 2002, a member of the Central Secretariat, and one of the top officials in charge of propaganda and ideology during the term of Party General Secretary and President Jiang Zemin.

Prior to his elevation to the Politburo, Ding served successively as Minister of Railways of China between 1985 and 1988, the chief of the Taiwan Affairs Office between 1988 and 1990, and the head of the United Front Work Department of the party between 1990 and 1992.[1]

Biography[edit]

Ding was born in September 1929 in Wuxi, Jiangsu province. He attended high school in Shanghai. He graduated from Shanghai Jiao Tong University with a degree in engineering. He joined the Communist Party in July 1956.

Ding was elevated to the Politburo of the Communist Party of China (CPC) in 1987, and was expected to take on more prominent posts. However, he was forced to resign due to a series of dire railway accidents in 1988. He was demoted to the vice director of the National Planning Commission. Later, Ding became the director of Taiwan Affairs Office of the State Council. He thus became the first politburo member, i.e., Party and nation's leader, who served as a vice Minister in the government after Cultural Revolution. Ding re-emerged in 1989 and took charge of the United Front Work Department of CPC. Since 1992, Ding had served as the head of Central Propaganda Department of CPC, responsible for ideological affairs for 10 years. He retired in 2002 due to his age.

Ding was a member of 12th, 13th, 14th and 15th Central Committees of the Communist Party of China, an alternate member of 13th Politburo, and a full member of 14th and 15th Politburo. Since the 4th plenary session of 13th Central Committee, he was a secretary of Central Secretariat of CPC.

Ding died July 22, 2012, in Beijing at the age of 83, he was eulogized by the party as a "long-tested fighter of the Communist cause".[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Biography of Ding Guangen". China Vitae. Retrieved 28 December 2010. 
  2. ^ "Ding Guanggen Died" (in Chinese). Xinhua News Agency. July 22, 2012. Retrieved July 22, 2012. 
Government offices
Preceded by
Chen Puru
Minister of Railways of the People's Republic of China
1985–1988
Succeeded by
Li Senmao
Party political offices
Preceded by
Wang Renzhi
Head of Propaganda Department of the CPC Central Committee
1992–2002
Succeeded by
Liu Yunshan
Preceded by
Yan Mingfu
Head of the United Front Work Department of the CPC Central Committee
1990–1992
Succeeded by
Wang Zhaoguo