Dingo, Queensland

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Dingo
Queensland
Dingo is located in Queensland
Dingo
Dingo
Coordinates 23°39′0″S 149°20′0″E / 23.65000°S 149.33333°E / -23.65000; 149.33333Coordinates: 23°39′0″S 149°20′0″E / 23.65000°S 149.33333°E / -23.65000; 149.33333
Population 342 (2011 census)[1]
Postcode(s) 4702
Location
LGA(s) Central Highlands Region
State electorate(s) Gregory
Federal Division(s) Flynn
Localities around Dingo:
Jellinbah Alsace Mackenzie
Bluff Dingo Goowarra
Stewarton Blackdown Wooroona Wallaroo Coomoo

Dingo is a town and locality in the Central Highlands Region in Queensland, Australia.[2][3] In the 2011 census, Dingo had a population of 342 people.[1]

Geography[edit]

The town is on the Capricorn Highway, 762 kilometres (473 mi) north west of the state capital Brisbane and 148 kilometres (92 mi) west of the regional centre of Rockhampton.

History[edit]

The town was surveyed in 1889 and took its name from the nearby Dingo Creek.[3] For a time in 1940 the town was known as Remo.[3] Dingo Post Office opened on 1 October 1876.[4]

Dingo State School opened on 29 May 1876. [5]

In 1973, a population of Bridled nail-tail wallabies (Onychogalea fraenata) was found in the Dingo area by a fencing contractor. Until this sighting the species was thought to be extinct having not been seen since 1937. The area where the wallabies was rediscovered was protected as Taunton National Park.[6]

In the 2006 census, Dingo had a population of 263 people.[7]

Amenities[edit]

The Central Highlands Regional Council operates a public library at Normanby Street.[8]

Notable residents[edit]

Australian rugby league player Ben Hunt grew up in Dingo.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Dingo". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 11 October 2015.  Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Dingo - town (entry 9993)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 11 October 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c "Dingo - locality (entry 46946)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 11 October 2015. 
  4. ^ Premier Postal History. "Post Office List". Premier Postal Auctions. Retrieved 10 May 2014. 
  5. ^ "Opening and closing dates of schools in Queensland". Education Queensland. Retrieved 3 February 2018. 
  6. ^ "Bridled nailtail wallaby". Department of Environment and Resource Management (Queensland). Archived from the original on 11 May 2012. Retrieved 24 April 2012. 
  7. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Dingo". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 11 October 2015. 
  8. ^ "Dingo Library". Public Libraries Connect. State Library of Queensland. 28 November 2016. Retrieved 29 January 2018.