Dino Martin

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Don Martin
Sport(s) Basketball
Biographical details
Born (1920-05-25)May 25, 1920
Newport, Rhode Island
Died July 24, 1999(1999-07-24) (aged 79)
Bonita Springs, Florida
Playing career
1939–1942 Georgetown
1946–1948 Providence Steamrollers
Position(s) Forward
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1953–1962 Boston College
Head coaching record
Overall 109–102

Donald E. "Dino" Martin (May 25, 1920 – July 24, 1999) was an American basketball player and coach. He coached the Boston College Eagles men's basketball team from 1953 to 1962.

Martin was born in Newport, Rhode Island.[1] A graduate of the La Salle Academy, he played forward for the Georgetown Hoyas from 1939–1942. He averaged 6.6 points per game his senior season and 4.3 points per game for his career.[2] He, Buddy O'Grady, and Al Lujack were the first Georgetown players to play professionally.[3] He played for the Providence Steamrollers of the Basketball Association of America (BAA), the direct forerunner to the National Basketball Association (NBA), from 1946 to 1948.[4] He averaged 12.2 points per game in his rookie season, but only averaged 3.2 in his second and final year in the league.[5]

Martin coached tennis and basketball at the La Salle Academy for three years before moving to Boston College. Under his leadership the Eagles had a 109–102 record and made the NCAA tournament in 1958.

Martin left Boston College after the 1961–62 season to become Kirtland Country Club's tennis professional and coordinator of sports. There, Martin became close friends with fellow tennis pro Harry Kenney. Kenney's son, Douglas Kenney worked for Martin at Kirtland while Kenney was in high school.[6] He worked at Kirtland for 17 years before moving to Florida.[1]

Martin died in Bonita Springs, Florida, in 1999.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Obituaries". The Providence Journal. August 3, 1999. C04.
  2. ^ "Georgetown Basketball History: Player Directory". Archived from the original on 2009-11-16. Retrieved 2009-12-13. 
  3. ^ Bonnie Berkowitz & Cristina Rivero (2009-02-10). "A Century of Georgetown Basketball". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2009-12-13.  Missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  4. ^ "Hoyas in the Pros". Retrieved 2009-12-13. 
  5. ^ http://www.basketball-reference.com/players/m/martidi01.html
  6. ^ Josh Karp (2006). A Futile and Stupid Gesture: How Doug Kenney and National Lampoon Changed Comedy Forever. Chicago Review Press. ISBN 978-1-55652-602-2.