Dinophalus taeniatus

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Dinophalus taeniatus
Dinophilus taeniatus 1.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Annelida
Class: Polychaeta
Subclass: incertae sedis
Family: Dinophilidae
Genus: Dinophilus
Species: D. taeniatus
Binomial name
Dinophilus taeniatus
Harmer, 1889[1]

Dinophilus taeniatus is 1.5 – 2.5 mm long and about 150 µm wide, and its colour is orange with two distinct dark pigmented eyes on prostomium. Prostomium with two ciliary rings with a mid-dorsal interruption, and second ring being widest. Anterior part of prostomium has four large and many small bristles and sensory cilia. The trunk consist of 11 rings where the first nine rings are distinctly separate. Ventral trunk densely covered with cilia.[2] [3]

Ecology[edit]

Free swimming “Dinophilus taeniatus” are found October to June lives in tidal pools with the diatom “Enteromorpha” spp. and “Ulva lactuca”. Numbers peak March to April and decline with rising temperature and lesser diatom abundances, the decline is due to death of reproducing adults and obligatory encystment of juveniles.[2][3]

Distribution[edit]

North Sea (Scottish and English east coast. Belgian coast Helgoland(?). English Channel (Plymouth, Roscoff). Irish Sea (North Wales, Isle of Man). Atlantic (Irish coasts, Faroe Islands). Spanish coast (Valencia) Baltic (Kiel Bay). Skagerrak (Swedish west coast). White sea. Barents Sea.[3]

Reproduction[edit]

Females produces a maximum of 4 cocoons with up to 16 eggs each in a sequence of 2–3 months.. Excysted worms mature, feed and reproduce sexually until may.[3]

Systematics[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harmer, Sidney F, Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 6(6):1, 1889
  2. ^ a b Jennings, Jb; Pj Donworth (December 1986). "Observations on the Life-Cycle and Nutrition of Dinophilus-Taeniatus Harmer 1889 (annelida, Polychaeta)". Ophelia. 25 (3): 119–137. doi:10.1080/00785326.1986.10429744. ISSN 0078-5326. 
  3. ^ a b c d Westheide, W. Polychaetes: Interstitial Families. Synopsis of the British Fauna. 2008. Field Studies Council. Retrieved 2013-08-24.