Roman Catholic Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo)
Jump to: navigation, search
Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo
Dioecesis Aliphana-Caiacensis o Caiatina
Cattedrale di Alife.jpg
Alife Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Naples
Statistics
Area 580 km2 (220 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2015)
70,800 (est.)
68,500 (est.) (96.8%)
Parishes 44
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 5th Century
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Alife)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale di Maria SS. Assunta (Caiazzo)
Secular priests 53 (diocesan)
9 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Valentino Di Cerbo
Website
www.diocesi-alife-caiazzo.it

The Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo (Latin: Dioecesis Aliphana-Caiacensis o Caiatina) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Campania, southern Italy, created in 1986. In that year the historic Diocese of Alife was united with the Diocese of Caiazzo. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Naples.[1][2]

In 2014 the diocese had one priest for every 1,104 Catholics.

History[edit]

The old diocese of Alife was made up of twelve communes in the province of Caserta, Archbishopric of Benevento. The name of a Bishop of Alife appears for the first time among the signatories of the Roman Synod of 499, in the time of Pope Symmachus (Clarus episcopus Ecclesiœ Allifanœ subscripsi); see "Monumenta Germaniæ Historica," auct. Antiquiss., XII, 400.[3]

Bishops[edit]

Diocese of Alife[edit]

Erected: 5th Century
Latin Name: Aliphanus
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Benevento

Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo[edit]

United: 30 September 1986 with the Diocese of Caiazzo
Latin Name: Aliphanus-Caiacensis o Caiatinus

  • Nicola Comparone (10 Dec 1990 - 5 Jan 1998 Died)
  • Pietro Farina (16 Feb 1999 - 25 Apr 2009 Appointed, Bishop of Caserta)
  • Valentino Di Cerbo (6 Mar 2010 - )

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 9, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved March 29, 2016
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  4. ^ "Bishop Giovanni Zefra" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  5. ^ "Bishop Angelo Sacco" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  6. ^ "Bishop Ippolito Marsigli" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  7. ^ "Bishop Diego Gilberto Nogueras" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  8. ^ "Bishop Angelo Rossi" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  9. ^ "Bishop Giovanni Battista Santorio" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 29, 2016
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol IV. p. 78. 
  11. ^ "Bishop Modesto Gavazzi, O.F.M. Conv." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  12. ^ "Bishop Pietro Paolo Medici" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 20, 2017
  13. ^ "Bishop Henri Borghi, O.S.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  14. ^ "Bishop Domenico Caracciolo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 41°19′44″N 14°19′44″E / 41.3289°N 14.3289°E / 41.3289; 14.3289