Roman Catholic Diocese of Castellaneta

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Diocese of Castellaneta
Dioecesis Castellanetensis
Cattedrale di Castellaneta (TA).jpg
Castellaneta Cathedral
Location
Country  Italy
Ecclesiastical province Taranto
Statistics
Area 1,043 km2 (403 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
128,687
125,861 (97.8%)
Parishes 33
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 11th century
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Nicola
Secular priests 46 (diocesan)
8 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Claudio Maniago
Map
Locator map diocese of Castellaneta
Website
www.diocesicastellaneta.net

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Castellaneta (Latin: Dioecesis Castellanetensis) is in Apulia. It is a suffragan of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Taranto.[1][2]

History[edit]

Nothing is known of Castellaneta previous to 1080, when it was taken by Robert, Duke of Tarentum, who expelled its Byzantine inhabitants. At this time, possibly, the episcopal see was created;[3] in 1088 Tarentum was made a metropolitan see, and the diocese of Castellaneta was placed under his authority.[4] In 1088 Riccardo the Seneschal, nephew of Robert Guiscard, who happened to be Lord of Castellaneta, granted to the diocese several monasteries and churches which were under his control.[5] A bishop of Castellaneta, Joannes, is mentioned by Ferdinando Ughelli as first bishop of the diocese in 1088, but without documentation.[6]

In December 1100, Amuris, Bishop of Mottola and Castellaneta, who had been given the Church of Castellaneta to rule by Archbishop Alberto of Taranto, granted the Church of S. Matteo Apostolo to the monastery of Cava, with the permission of Duke Roger and Riccardo Siniscalco.[7] Mottola is only six miles east of Castellaneta. It appears that the diocese of Castellaneta was vacant, and that the Archbishop had assigned its administration to Amuris; the alternative theory is that Archbishop Amuris united the two dioceses, but such an action is a papal function. There is a record of an otherwise unknown Bishop of Mottola, who died in 1040; his successor was a certain Liberius.[8]

Bishops[edit]

to 1400[edit]

  • Angelus (attested 1181)[9]
  • Ignotus (attested 1195)[10]
  • Robertus (attested 1196)[11]
  • Sanctorus (attested January 1220)[12]
  • Marcus (by 1226 – 3 November 1242)[13]
  • Blasius (attested 1 July 1258 – 22 April 1279)[14]
  • Petrus, O.Cist.[15] (1282)
  • Ioannes, O.Min. (attested 1284, 1299)[16]
  • Bernardus (Bohemundus) (attested 1300)
  • Angelus (attested 1328)
  • Theobaldus (1331 –1342)[17]
  • Petrus de Baia (4 February 1344 – 1367?)
  • Thomas of Sulmona, O.P. (16 August 1367 – ? )
  • Benedictus Andrighelli[18] (c. 1378 ? – ? ) (Roman Obedience)
  • Bartholomaeus de Senis[19] (16 November 1386 – ) (Roman Obedience)
  • Benedictus de Ascoli, O.E.S.A.[20](attested 1396)

from 1400 to 1600[edit]

  • Robertus de Gratiano[21] (6 September 1409 – 1418)
  • Franciscus Archamoni (14 November 1418 – 1424)
  • Bartholomaeus Stephani[22] (27 October 1424 – 1431)
  • Gregorius Restii (Recii) de Gravina (19 November 1431 – 1454)
  • Eustachius[23] (29 March 1454 – )
  • Giovanni Francesco Orsini (31 January 1477 – ?)
  • Antonius de Pyrro[24] (19 March 1494 – 8 October 1492)
  • Antonius Galeghi (Galieto), O.E.S.A.[25] (21 November 1496 – 1513)
  • Marcus Antonius Pheoldi (6 April 1513 – 1536)
  • Joannes Petrus Santorii[26] (14 July 1536 – 1536)
  • Bartholomaeus Siringi (the elder)[27] (6 November 1536 – 17 March 1544)
  • Bartholomaeus Siringi (the younger)(17 March 1544 – 1577)
  • Joannes Aloysius de Benedictis[28] (24 May 1577 – 28 January 1585)
  • Bernardus de Benedictis (28 January 1585 – 1607)

from 1600 to 1800[edit]

  • Aureolus Averardi[29] (7 November 1609 – 1617)
  • Antonio Mattei[30] (12 February 1618 – 1635)
  • Ascensio Guerreri (7 May 1635 – 1645)
  • Angelo Melchiori (31 July 1645 – 1650)
  • Carlo Antonio Agudio[31] (21 November 1650 – 1673)
  • Carlo Falconi (bishop)[32] (13 March 1673 – January 1677)
  • Domenico Antonio Bernardini[33] (26 April 1677 – 18 June 1696)
  • Onuphrio Montesoro[34] (17 December 1696 – 24 December 1722)
  • Bonaventura Blasi, O.F.M.Conv.[35] (11 September 1724 – March 1733)
  • Maxentius Filo[36] 11 May 1733 – September 1763)
  • Leonardo Vitetta[37] (20 February 1764 – 1788)
  • Joachim Vassetta, Cong.Cl.S.P.[38] (27 December 1792 – 1793)
  • Vincenzo Maria Castro[39] (18 December 1797 – 9 October 1800)

since 1800[edit]

  • Salvatore Lettieri[40] (6 April 1818 - 27 June 1825)
  • Pietro Lepore[41] (9 April 1827 - 26 June 1851)
  • Bartolomeo d’Avanzo[42] (18 March 1852 - 13 July 1860)
  • Mariano Positano[43] (21 March 1873 - 13 May 1880)
  • Gaetano Bacile di Castiglione[44] (20 August 1880 - 14 May 1886)
  • Giocondo (Matthaeus) de Nittis, O.F.M. (7 June 1886 - 28 February 1908)
  • Federico de Martino (30 November 1908 - 26 Aug 1909)
...

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Castellaneta" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved October 7, 2016.[self-published source?]
  2. ^ "Diocese of Castellaneta" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved October 7, 2016
  3. ^ See Paul Fridolin Kehr, Italia Pontificia Vol. IX (Berlin: Weidmann 1962), pp. 445-447, for a citation of the bibliography and evidence.
  4. ^ Giovanni Guerrieri (1899). Il conte normanno Riccardo Siniscalco, 1081-1115, e i monasteri Benedettini Cavesi in terra d'Otranto (in Italian). Trani: V. Vecchi. pp. 35–36. 
  5. ^ Guerrieri, pp. 35, 117-118.
  6. ^ Ughelli, p. 151.
  7. ^ Guerrieri, pp. 79-80. The document comes from the monstery of S. Trinita de Cava, which has a reputation for forgery. See e.g. P. F. Kehr, Italia pontificia VIII (Berlin 1935), pp. 316-330, nos. 3, 11, 12, 13, 27, 28. In 1126 there was litigation between Bishop Marco of Castellaneta and the monk Gregory of Cava: Guerrieri, p. 37.
  8. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  9. ^ Kamp, p. 707.
  10. ^ The bishop was the recipient of a papal mandate. P. F. Kehr, Italia pontificia IX, p. 421, no. 23. Kamp, p. 707. He may be Bishop Robert.
  11. ^ Ughelli, p. 153. Kamp, p. 708.
  12. ^ Sanctorus: Kamp, p. 708.
  13. ^ Marco: Kamp, p. 708.
  14. ^ Blasius died between 1279 and 1282; Kamp, p. 709, prefers 1281.
  15. ^ Elected by the Cathedral Chapter, but died before he could be confirmed. The Papal Legate in the Kingdom of Naples, Cardinal Gerardus, Bishop of Sabina, was authorized to provide a suitable bishop. Cappelletti, p. 142-143, no. VII. Registres de Martin IV (Paris: albert Fontemoing 1901), p. 123, no. 294 (23 November 1282). Eubel, I, p. 172, note 1.
  16. ^ Ioannes: Ughelli, p. 153. Cappelletti, p. 142.
  17. ^ Theobaldus: Eubel, I, p. 172.
  18. ^ Andrighelli was an appointee of Urban VI, probably near the beginning of the Great Western Schism. In 1382 he was staying in Florence, since the Kingdom of Naples was hostile to Urban VI. Eubel, I, p. 172 with note 3.
  19. ^ Eubel, I, p. 172.
  20. ^ Benedictus had been Bishop of Acerna, appointed by Urban VI (from 1389–1396). Gams, p. 873. Eubel, I, p. 69, 172.
  21. ^ Bishop Robertus was provided by Gregory XII of the Roman Obedience. Eubel, I, p. 172.
  22. ^ Bartholomaeus had been Cantor in the Cathedral Chapter of Castellaneta. Eubel, I, p. 172; II, p. 120.
  23. ^ Eustachius had been Cantor in the Chapter of the Collegiate Church of S. Maria Annunziata de Masaffia (Mottola). Eubel, II, p. 120.
  24. ^ Bishop Antonius was transferred to the diocese of Avellino on 8 October 1492. Eubel, II, pp. 100, 120.
  25. ^ Antonius (or Alfonso, in Eubel III) Galeghi: Eubel, II, p. 120; III, p. 156.
  26. ^ Gian Pietro Santorii had been Praeceptor of the Hospitale di Santo Spirito in Sasso in Rome. He died while still in Rome. Eubel, III, p. 156, note 3; p. 157.
  27. ^ Siringi had been Bishop of Ario (Crete) (1520–1536). He resigned the diocese of Castellaneta in favor of his nephew Eubel, III, pp. 116, 157.
  28. ^ Giovanni Luigi dei Benedetti was a Cypriot; his brother and successor was a priest of Nicosia in Cyprus. Eubel, III, p. 157.
  29. ^ Averardi was a priest of Brescia, and was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) and theology. He held a canonry. He resigned in 1617. Eubel, III, p. 157. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV (1935), p. 139 with note 2.
  30. ^ Mattei was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law), and held a benefice at S. Maria de Loreto. He was Vicar General of the diocese of Macerata when named Bishop of Castellanata.
  31. ^ Agudio died on 15 January 1673. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 147, note 2.
  32. ^ Falconi was born in Città Ducale, and was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the Sapienza in Rome (1673), and became a priest in the same year. He died in Città Ducale in January 1677. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 147-148, with note 3.
  33. ^ Bernardini was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the Sapienza in Rome. He was transferred to the diocese of Mileto (Calabria) on 18 June 1696. He died in January 1723. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 148 with note 4.
  34. ^ Born in Bari in 1647, Montesoro was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the University of Naples (1669). He was a Canon of Pozzuoli, then Vicar General and Vicar Capitular. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Sebastiano Tanara on 21 December. Montesoro resigned on 24 December 1722. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 148 with note 5.
  35. ^ Blasi was a native of Ceppaloni (Benevento), and was a master of theology (1688). He was Provincial of the Neapolitan Province of his Order in 1722, and was a Vicar Forane and Synodical Examiner of priests in the diocese of Benevento. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Francesco Barberini on 21 September 1724. He died in residence in his diocese in March 1733. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 148 with note 7.
  36. ^ Filo was born at Altamura (Bari), and was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the Sapienza in Rome (1711). He taught philosophy and theology. He was consecrated in Rome on 17 May 1733 by Cardinal Antonio Severio Gentili. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 153 with note 2.
  37. ^ Vitetta was born in the village of Cirò (Umbriatico) in 1703. He obtained the degree Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the University of Naples (1725). He was Vicar General in Rossano, Cosenza, Sulmona and Avellino. Vitetta was consecrated bishop in Rome on 25 February 1764 by Cardinal Ferdinando Maria de Rossi. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 153 with note 3.
  38. ^ Vassetta was born in Vasti (Chieti) in 1740. He was Rector of the colleges of the city of Naples, and was Examiner of Clerics. He taught theology. On 16 December 1791, and approved by Pope Pius VI on 27 December. On 4 March 1792 Vassetta was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Andrea Corsini. He died in 1793. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 153 with note 4.
  39. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 153 with note 5.
  40. ^ A native of Foggia, Lettieri a master of theology and Canon of the Cathedral of Foggia. He was nominated by King Ferdinand IV, and approved by Pope Pius VII on 6 April 1818. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 12 April 1818 by Cardinal Alessandro Mattei. He was appointed Bishop of Nardo on 27 June 1825. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 139, 281.
  41. ^ Lepore was a native of Trani. He was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 16 April 1829 by Cardinal Carlo Odescalchi. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, p. 139.
  42. ^ Born in Avella in 1811, D'Avanzo studied at the seminary at Nola and the University of Naples. He was appointed Canon Theologicus in the Cathedral Chapter of Avella, and he taught theology and Hebrew at the seminary at Nola. He rose to be Primicerius in the Cathedral Chapter. He was appointed Bishop of Calvi-Teano on 13 July 1860 by Pope Pius IX. He was named a Cardinal on 3 April 1876. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, pp. 53, 174, 190. La Civiltà cattolica. Serie 12 (in Italian). Volume VIII. Firenze: La Civiltà Cattolica. 1884. pp. 492–493. UOM:39015036662149. 
  43. ^ Positano was a native of Naples, born in 1816. He served as Economos of the Parish of the Incoronatella, Rector of the church of S. Bartolommeo, Censor of the Clergy, Inspector of Schools, and Canon and Vicar-Curate in the Collegial Church of S. Giovanni Maggiore. He was consecrated on 23 March 1873 by Cardinal Carlo Sacconi. Pope Pius IX (1873). De Franciscis, Pasquale, ed. Discorsi del Sommo Pontefice Pio IX (in Italian and Latin). Volume II. Roma: Ghione e Lovesio. p. 287.  Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, p. 190.
  44. ^ Bacile di Castiglione was born at Spongano (near Otranto, Lecce). He was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 29 August 1880 by Cardinal Raffaele Monaco La Valletta. He was appointed Bishop of Leuce on 7 June 1886. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, p. 190.

Books[edit]

Reference Works[edit]

Studies[edit]

acknowledgment[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 40°38′00″N 16°56′00″E / 40.6333°N 16.9333°E / 40.6333; 16.9333