Roman Catholic Diocese of Nice

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Diocese of Nice
Dioecesis Nicensis
Diocèse de Nice
NIKAIA-steReparate Pano.jpg
Location
Country  France
Ecclesiastical province Marseille
Metropolitan Archdiocese of Marseille
Statistics
Area 4,283 km2 (1,654 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
1,210,000
778,000 (64.3%)
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Sui iuris church Latin Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 3rd Century
Cathedral Cathedral Basilica of St. Mary and St. Reparata in Nice
Patron saint Saint Reparata
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop André Marceau
Metropolitan Archbishop Georges Pontier
Apostolic Administrator Guy Marie Alexandre Thomazeau
Emeritus Bishops Louis Sankalé Bishop Emeritus (2005–2013)
Jean Marie Louis Bonfils Bishop Emeritus (1998–2005)
Map
Diocèse de Nice.svg
Website
Website of the Diocese

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Nice (Latin: Dioecesis Nicensis; French: Diocèse de Nice) is a diocese of the Latin Church of the Roman Catholic Church in France. The diocese comprises the Départment of Alpes-Maritimes. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Marseille.

Bishop Louis Albert Joseph Roger Sankalé, appointed on March 28, 2005, tendered his resignation on August 8, 2013. On Thursday, March 6, 2014, Pope Francis appointed Bishop André Marceau, who until then had been serving as bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Perpignan–Elne, France, as Bishop of Nice.[1] He was installed as bishop of Nice on May 11, 2014.[2]

History[edit]

According to local tradition, Nice was evangelized by St. Barnabas, who had been sent by St. Paul, or else by St. Mary Magdalen, St. Martha, and St. Lazarus (who had been resurrected from the dead by Christ himself).[3]

St. Bassus, a martyr under Emperor Decius, is believed to have been the first Bishop of Nice. The See of Nice in Roman Gallia Narbonensis is said to have existed in 314, since the bishop sent delegates to the Council of Arles in that year.[4] Louis Duchesne, however, pointed out that Nice was not a city (civitas) and did not have its own municipal administration. It was governed from the city of Marseille by a civic functionary called an episcopus ('overseer'). In 314, this situation was still in effect, and the delegates sent to the Council of Nicaea came from the portus of Nice, not the civitas; the delegates represented the chief civic administrator, the episcopus from Marseille. In Duchesne's view, there was not yet an ecclesiastical leader in Nice called an episcopus.[5]

The first bishop known by name is Amantius, who attended the Council of Aquileia in 381.[6]

Cimiez, a civitas near Nice, but in the province of Alpes Maritimae and indeed its largest town, is claimed to have had an episcopal see around 260.[7] The episcopal seat was held in the middle of the fifth century by St. Valerianus.[8] A papal rescript of Pope Leo I (440–461), issued after AD 450, joined the two dioceses into one. This union was undone by Pope Hilarius, but in 465 he reunited the sees of Nice and Cimiez at the demand of Bishop Ingenuus of Embrun, the Metropolitan of the Alpes Maritimae, who was quarreling with Bishop Auxanius.[9] This united see was a suffragan of ancient Diocese of Embrun up to the French Revolution.

When the Emperor Charlemagne happened to visit Cimiez (which had been devastated by the Lombards in 574), he caused Bishop Syagrius of Nice to build on its ruins the monastery of Saint Pontius of Cimiez.

Bishops of Nice bore the title of Counts of Drap, since the donation of property situated at Drap made in 1073 by Pierre, Bishop of Vaison, a native of Nice, to Bishop Raymond I and his successors. This made the Bishops of Nice prince-bishops. In 1388 Nice fell under the political control of the Counts of Savoy.[10]

The diocese was re-established by the Concordat of 1801 as suffragan of Aix. While the Countship of Nice from 1818 to 1860 was part of the Sardinian States, the see became a suffragan of Genoa. When Nice was annexed to France in 1860, certain parts which remained Italian were cut off from it and added to the Diocese of Vintimille. In 1862 the diocese was again a suffragan of Aix. The arrondissement of Grasse was separated from the Diocese of Fréjus in 1886, and given to Nice which since unites the three former diocese of Nice, diocese of Grasse and diocese of Vence.

Ordinaries[edit]

Bishops to 1000[edit]

...
...
  • Frodonius 999-1004

Mediaeval Bishops[edit]

  • Bernard (1004? – ?)
  • Pons (1011–1030)
  • André I (1033–1034)
  • Nitard (1037–1040)
  • André II (1042–1051)
  • Raimond I (1064–1074)
  • Archimbaud (1074–1078)
  • Anselm [19] (1100–07).
  • Isnard (1108–1114)
  • Pierre (1115–1149)
  • Arnaud (1151–1164)
  • Raimond Laugier (1164–1182)
  • Pierre (1183–1191)
  • Jean (1200–1207)
  • Henri (1208–1236)
  • Mainfroi (1238–1246)
  • Nitard (1247–1251)
  • Pierre II (1257–1272)
  • Hugues (1285–1292)
  • Bernard Chabaud de Tourettes (1294–1302)

Bishops during the Avignon Papacy[edit]

  • Raimond (1304–1316)
  • Guillaume, O.Min. (1317–1323)[20]
  • Rostaing, O.P. (1323–1329)[21]
  • Jean Artaud, O.P. (1329–1334)
  • Raymond, O.Min. (1334–1335)[22]
  • Guillaume (1335 – 1348?)[23]
  • Pierre Sardina (1348–1360)
  • Laurent Le Peintre (1360–1367)
  • (Pierre) Roquesalve de Soliers, O.P. (1371–1380)

Bishops during the Great Western Schism[edit]

  • Jean de Tournefort (1382–1400) (Avignon Obedience)[24]
  • Damiano Zavaglia, O.P. (1385 – 1388.06) (Roman Obedience)[25]
  • François (1403–1409) (Avignon Obedience)[26]
  • Jean de Burle (1409–1418) (Avignon Obedience)[27]

Bishops of the Renaissance[edit]

  • Antoine Clément (1418–1422)
  • Aimon de Chissé (1422–1427)
  • Aimond de Chissé (1427–1428)
  • Louis Badat (1428–1444)
  • Aimon Provana de Leyni (1446–1460)
  • Henri de Albertis (1461–1462)
  • Barthélemi Chuet (1462–1501)
  • Jean de Loriol (1501–1506)
  • Fr. Agostino Ferrero (Apostolic Administrator 1506 – 1511.09.16)
  • Jérôme de Capitani d'Arsago (1511–1542)

Bishops to the Revolution[edit]

  • Girolamo Recanati Capodiferro (6 Feb 1542 Appointed – 30 Jul 1544)[28]
  • François de Lambert ( 1549 Appointed – 1582)
  • Jean Louis Pallavicino Ceva (7 Nov 1583 – 5 Nov 1598)
  • François Martinengo, (23 Oct 1600 Appointed – 22 Aug 1620)
  • Pierre François Maletti, (10 Jan 1622 Appointed – 4 Dec 1631)
  • Giacomo Marenco (17 Dec 1634 Appointed – 2 Jan 1644)
  • Didier Palleti, (28 Nov 1644 Appointed – 18 Sep 1658)
  • Giacinto Solaro di Moretta (9 Jun 1659 – 23 Apr 1663) [29][30][31]
  • Diego della Chiesa (6 Jul 1665 – 30 Dec 1669)
  • Henri Provana, (23 Feb 1671 – 30 Nov 1706)
  • Raymond Recrosio, (30 Jul 1727 Confirmed – 21 May 1732)
  • Charles-François Cantoni (Couton) (17 Apr 1741 – 23 Aug 1763)[32]
  • Jacques-Thomas Astesan, O.P. (9 Jul 1764 Confirmed – 1 Jun 1778)[33]
  • Charles-Eugène de Valperga de Maglione (20 Mar 1780 – Oct 1800)[34]

Modern Bishops[edit]

  • Jean-Baptiste Colonna d'Istria † (11 Jul 1802 Ordained – 29 Jul 1833 Retired)
  • Dominique Galvano † (24 Nov 1833 Ordained – 17 Aug 1855 Died)
  • Jean-Pierre Sola † (3 Jan 1858 Ordained – Oct 1877 Retired)
  • Matthieu-Victor-Félicien Balaïn, (10 Mar 1878 Ordained – 3 Sep 1896 Installed, Archbishop of Auch)
  • Henri-Louis Chapon † (29 Sep 1896 Ordained – 14 Dec 1925 Died)
  • Louis-Marie Ricard † (22 Jun 1926 Installed – 21 Oct 1929 Died)
  • Paul-Jules-Narcisse Rémond † (8 Jul 1930 Installed – 24 Apr 1963 Died)
  • Jean-Julien-Robert Mouisset † (24 Apr 1963 Succeeded – 30 Apr 1984 Retired)
  • François de Sales Marie Adrien Saint-Macary † (30 Apr 1984 Succeeded – 14 Nov 1997 Appointed, Coadjutor Archbishop of Rennes (, Dol, e Saint-Malo))
  • Jean Marie Louis Bonfils, S.M.A. (28 Aug 1998 Appointed – 28 Mar 2005 Retired)
  • Louis Albert Joseph Roger Sankalé (28 Mar 2005 Succeeded – 8 Aug 2013 Resigned)
  • André Marceau[35] (6 Mar 2014 Appointed; 11 May 2014 Installed – current)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-06. Retrieved 2014-03-06. 
  2. ^ http://catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bmarceau.html
  3. ^ Duchesne, pp. 321-359, who indicates that the story of evangelization by the family of Bethany is no older than the 11th century, and appears to originate at Vézelay (p. 358).
  4. ^ The subscription list does not actually say that a bishop sent delegates, merely that a deacon and an exorcist attended. It merely says, Innocentius diaconus, Agapitus exorcista, ex portu Nicaensi. J. Sirmond, Conciliorum Galliae tam editorum quam ineditorum collectio Tomus I, editio secunda (Paris: Didot 1789), p. 104.
  5. ^ Duchesne, p. 296. Duchesne is seconding the similar judgment of Denis de Saint-Marthe, in Gallia christiana III, pp. 1269–1270.
  6. ^ Duchesne considers Amantius the first known bishop, not Bassus. Amantius was present at the Council of Aquileia in 381, as was the Bishop of Marseille. J.-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus III (Florence: A. Zatta 1759), p. 600. Duchesne, p. 296, no. 1.
  7. ^ Denis de Saint-Marthe, in Gallia christiana III, p. 1267–1268, admits that the early history of Christianity in Cimiez is fictitious, though he temporizes by saying that he neither affirms nor denies the tales.
  8. ^ Valerianus was present at church councils between 439 and 451. Duchesne, pp. 295-296.
  9. ^ J. P. Migne, Patrologiae Latinae LVIII, p. 20-22. P. Jaffé, Regesta pontificum Romanorum I, editio altera (Leipzig 1885) no. 562. Pope Hilarius' letter terms Cimiez a civitas and Nice a castellum. Duchesne, pp. 296-298, argues that Bishop Auxanius was Bishop of Marseille, who was attempting to assert his city's control over Nice. Auxanius had consecrated a bishop for the diocese of Nice, according to the Pope's letter.
  10. ^ Gallia christiana III, pp. 1269–1270.
  11. ^ Diocese of Nice. at GCatholic.org.
  12. ^ Diocese of Nice at catholic.org.
  13. ^ Diocese of Nice at catholic.org.
  14. ^ Magnus attended the council of Arles in 554. Sirmond, I, p. 1093: Magnus in Christi nomine episcopus ecclesiae Cemelensis (Cimiez).
  15. ^ Austadius is mentioned in the legend of a local saint in the Nice area by Gregory of Tours in his History of the Franks, Book VI, chapter 6. Duchesne, p. 298, no. 3.
  16. ^ Representatives of Catulinus were present at the Second Council of Mâcon in 585. Sirmond, I, p. 1306. Duchesne, p. 298, no. 4.
  17. ^ Bishop Abraham was present at the V Council of Paris in 614. Carolus de Clercq, Concilia Galliae, A. 511 – A. 695 (Turnhout: Brepols 1963), p. 282: ex civitate Nicia Abraham episcopus. Duchesne, p. 298, no. 5.
  18. ^ Saint Syagrius of Nice.
  19. ^ Anselm was a former monk of Lérins, and reputed a local saint.
  20. ^ Guillaume had been an Apostolic Penitentiary and a 'familiaris' of Pope John XXII: Eubel, I, p. 364.
  21. ^ Rostagnus, who had been Prior of the Dominican convent in Marseille, was granted his bulls on 5 April 1323. Eubel, I, p. 364.
  22. ^ Fr. Raymond was granted his bulls on 10 January 1134. Eubel, I, p. 364.
  23. ^ Guillaume had been Archdeacon of Nice. He was appointed on 29 March 1335. Eubel, I, p. 364.
  24. ^ Tournefort was appointed by Pope Clement VII (Avignon Obedience) on 21 February 1382. Eubel, I, p. 364.
  25. ^ Fr. Damiano was provided by Urban VI of the Roman Obedience.
  26. ^ Bishop François de Nizza had been a Papal Referendary, and then was provided Bishop of Imola by Benedict XIII, He was provided to Nice by Pope Benedict XIII on 17 October 1403. He was transferred to Orense on 13 November 1408. He died in 1419/1420. Eubel I, p. 119, 284, 364.
  27. ^ Jean de Burle had been a priest of the diocese of Lyon, and was Doctor of Laws. He was provided Bishop of Nice on 4 March 1409 by Benedict XIII, and on the same day named Abbot Commendatory of the Abbey of S. Pons outside Nice. He was transferred to the diocese of Saint-Papoul on 23 September 1418 by Pope Martin V. Eubel, I, p. 364 with note 8; p. 390.
  28. ^ Bishop of Nice at Catholic-Hierarchy.org.
  29. ^ Gauchat, Hierarchia Catholica, IV, Page 249, and Page 258
  30. ^ Ritzler (ed.), Hierarchia Catholica, V, p. 275, and p. 309.
  31. ^ Les Ordinations Épiscopales, Year 1659, Number 19.[full citation needed]
  32. ^ Cantoni was born in a place called Ronco in the diocese of Vercelli. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) (Turin 1711). He was a Canon and Vicar-General of the diocese of Vercelli. He was nominated bishop of Nice by the King of Sardinia on 22 February 1741, and approved by Pope Benedict XIV on 17 April 1741. He was consecrated in Rome by the Pope on 23 April 1741. He died on 23 August 1763. Ritzler, VI. p. 309, with note 2.
  33. ^ Ritzler, VI. p. 309, with note 3.
  34. ^ Ritzler, VI. p. 309, with note 4.
  35. ^ Bishop Marceau had been Bishop of Perpignan-Elne from 2004 to 2014. Biographie de Mgr. André Marceau, retrieved: 2016-12-07. (French)

Sources[edit]

Reference Books[edit]

Studies[edit]

External links[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

Coordinates: 43°42′53″N 7°15′26″E / 43.71472°N 7.25722°E / 43.71472; 7.25722