Roman Catholic Diocese of Venosa

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The Italian Catholic diocese of Venosa, in southern Italy, existed until 1986. In that year it was united into the Diocese of Melfi-Rapolla-Venosa. It had been a suffragan of the archdiocese of Potenza e Marsico Nuovo.[1][2]

History[edit]

The earliest events of the Christian history of Venosa are the martyrdoms of the Twelve Brothers (286) and of Feliz, Bishop of Tabara in Africa, and his companions (303). Stephanus (498) is the first Bishop of Venosa whose date is known accurately.

The names of other bishops up to the Norman conquest have not been preserved. Buono (1223) was assassinated by a cleric; Lamberto Arbaudo (1509) embellished the cathedral, which was demolished a little later to permit the erection of fortifications.

In 1818 the diocese of Lavello, suffragan to the archdiocese of Bari, founded in 1042 when the Norman count Arnichino fixed his seat at Lavello, was united to Venosa.[3]

Ordinaries[edit]

Diocese of Venosa[edit]

Erected: 5th Century
Latin Name: Venusinus
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Potenza e Marsico Nuovo

...

1200 to 1400[edit]

1400 to 1600[edit]

1600 to 1800[edit]

since 1800[edit]

  • Nicola Caldora (26 Jun 1818 Confirmed - 10 Dec 1825 Resigned)
  • Luigi Maria Parisio (Canisio) (9 Apr 1827 Confirmed - 25 Jun 1827 Confirmed, Bishop of Gaeta)
  • Federico Guarini, O.S.B. (23 Jun 1828 Confirmed - Sep 1837 Died)
  • Michele de Gattis (2 Oct 1837 Confirmed - 23 Apr 1847 Died)
  • Antonio Michele Vaglio (22 Dec 1848 Confirmed - 28 Jul 1865 Died)
  • Nicola de Martino (22 Dec 1871 - 9 Jul 1878 Resigned)
  • Girolamo Volpe (15 Jul 1878 Succeeded - 27 Feb 1880 Appointed, Bishop of Alife)
  • Francesco Maria Imparati, O.F.M. (27 Feb 1880 - 23 Jun 1890 Appointed, Archbishop of Acerenza e Matera)
  • Lorenzo Antonelli (1 Jun 1891 - 13 Jul 1905 Died)
  • Felice del Sordo (12 Aug 1907 - 12 Oct 1911 Appointed, Bishop of Alife)
  • Giovanni Battista Niola (Oct 1912 - Nov 1912 Resigned)
  • Angelo Petrelli (20 May 1913 - 11 Sep 1923 Died)
  • Alberto Costa (30 Apr 1924 - 7 Dec 1928 Appointed, Bishop of Lecce)
  • Luigi dell'Aversana (Orabona) (14 Jan 1931 - 6 Nov 1934 Died)
  • Domenico Petroni (1 Apr 1935 - 5 Oct 1966 Retired)
  • Giuseppe Vairo (5 Mar 1973 - 25 Oct 1976 Appointed, Bishop of Tricarico)
  • Armando Franco (25 Oct 1976 - 12 Sep 1981 Appointed, Bishop of Oria)

30 September 1986 United with the Diocese of Melfi e Rapolla to form the Diocese of Melfi-Rapolla-Venosa

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Venosa" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Venosa" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  4. ^ "Bishop Nicolas Solimele" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Eubel, Konrad (1923). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol III (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. p. 330.  (in Latin)
  6. ^ "Bishop Lamberto Arbaud" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  7. ^ "Bishop Tommaso da San Cipriano, O.P." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  8. ^ "Bishop Francesco Rusticucci" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  9. ^ "Bishop Baldassarre Giustiniani" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  10. ^ "Bishop Pietro Ridolfi, O.F.M. Conv." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol IV. p. 364. 
  12. ^ "Bishop Andrea Pierbenedetti" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved November 24, 2016
  13. ^ "Bishop Bartolomeo Frigerio" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 28, 2017
  14. ^ "Bishop Gaspare Conturla" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 31, 2017
  15. ^ "Bishop Sallustio Pecólo (Pecoli)" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved July 18, 2016

Books[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.