Dioclea (Phrygia)

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Dioclea, Dioclia, Diocleia, or Diokleia (Ancient Greek: Διοκλεία) was a town of ancient Phrygia, inhabited during Roman and Byzantine times.[1][2]

History[edit]

In Hellenic times it had a mint,[3][4] under its king Elagabalus.[5]

It was the see of a Christian bishop.[6] Lequien, names only two known bishops of the town.[7] Constantius (fl 431[8] - 451[9]) and Evander[10] No longer the seat of a residential bishop, it remains a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.[11]

Its site is located near Yeşilhisar in Asiatic Turkey.[1][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Richard Talbert, ed. (2000). Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. Princeton University Press. p. 62, and directory notes accompanying.
  2. ^ Ptolemy. The Geography. 5.2.23.
  3. ^ diocleia, monism.org.
  4. ^ https://www.asiaminorcoins.com/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=359
  5. ^ Barclay Vincent Head, Catalogue of the Greek Coins of Phrygia British Museum. Dept. of Coins and Medals, (order of the Trustees, 1906) page 181.
  6. ^ W. M. Ramsay, The Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia The Journal of Hellenic Studies Vol. 4 (1883), pp. 370-436
  7. ^ Lequien, Or. Christ., I, 823
  8. ^ Politics and Bishops' Lists at the First Council of Ephesus.
  9. ^ Richard Price, Michael Gaddis, The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, Volume 1(Liverpool University Press, 2005) page 335.
  10. ^ Richard Price, Michael Gaddis The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, Volume 1(Liverpool University Press, 2005) page 227
  11. ^ Catholic Hierarchy
  12. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1854–1857). "Diocleia". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography. London: John Murray.

Coordinates: 38°39′50″N 29°53′17″E / 38.6638015°N 29.88814°E / 38.6638015; 29.88814