Disability in Peru

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Peruvians with disabilities constitute 5.2% of the population. 52.1% of disabled people are women. 40.5% of disabled Peruvians have a primary or better education. 76.8% are not economically active they have an unemployment rate of 12.1%. Of those Peruvians with disabilities who do work, 58.3% are self-employed.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Congress member, Kenji Fujimori, donates wheelchairs to children with disabilities.
Congress member, Kenji Fujimori, donates wheelchairs to children with disabilities.

In 2012, the largest group of people with disabilities in Peru had were those with physical issues, such as an inability to walk or use their arms or legs and who made up 59.2% of all disabled Peruvians. The second largest group (50.9%) experienced some type of visual impairment.[2] Around 88% of those with disabilities in Peru do not receive treatment or therapy for their disabilities.[3] In addition, more than 81% of disabled people in Peru did not know there were organizations that were able to help them with their disability.[4] As reported by The Guardian in 2016, Peru has one of the highest employment gaps for people with disabilities in the world.[5]

In areas such as the Sacred Valley, 89% of children with disabilities don't go to school.[6]

Law and policy[edit]

Articles 7, 16 and 23 of the Constitution of Peru address disability.[7] Article 7 states that individuals have the right to health protections and if they are unable to care for themselves, has rights for care, rehabilitation, security and respect.[7] Articles 16 and 23 address the rights of the disabled to have access to education and employment respectively.[7]

The general law that covers people with disabilities is Law No. 27050, created in 1998.[8] This law established the National Council for the Integration of Persons with Disability (CONADIS).[8] It also established hiring quotas for companies employing more than 50 people.[9] CONADIS also helps disabled people find jobs by promoting them through their job board network.[1] The Ministry of Labor and Promotion of Employment (MINTRA) helps young people find jobs.[1] Despite quotas, some employers get around the law by counting people with glasses or frequent headaches as "disabled."[10]

Law no. 29392, signed into law on September 9, 2009 by President Alan Garcia Perez, expands on Law No. 27050.[11] The authority for applying the law is the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations and it provides ways to sanction individuals and corporations who violate the law.[11]

In 2004, Peru's Ministry of Health published "Guidelines for Action in Mental Health," moving towards better support for those with mental disabilities.[12]

Between 2001 and October 2011, a policy of the National Registry of Identification and Civil Status (RENIEC) prevented people with mental and intellectual disabilities from obtaining national identity cards or if they were issued a card, it listed their disability on the ID.[13] Because of this, around 23,000 disabled people were unable to vote, cash checks, distribute property to their children and faced other types of social discrimination.[13]

Social security[edit]

Article 21 of the Constitution of Peru is concerned with who may be included in Social Security in coordination with CONADIS for the disabled.[14]

Politics[edit]

Advocacy[edit]

Third Congress Vice President Michael Urtecho and Congressmen Gian Carlo Vacchelli and John Reynaga participated in the launch of the school enrollment campaign for children, adolescents and young people with some form of disability
Third Congress Vice President Michael Urtecho and Congressmen Gian Carlo Vacchelli and John Reynaga participated in the launch of the school enrollment campaign for children, adolescents and young people with some form of disability.

A new program to help low income women and people with disabilities in Peru obtain technology-related jobs was initiated in 2017.[15] The program created an online platform where employers could identify job candidates.[15]

Mental Disability Rights International in 2004 found that human rights abuses were taking place in mental institutions in Peru.[16]

In areas of Peru where people are living in poverty, individuals with intellectual disabilities have less access to education.[17]

Sport[edit]

Peru made its Paralympic Games début at the 1972 Summer Paralympics in Heidelberg, with a single representative to compete in swimming. It sent two competitors to the 1976 Games, then was absent for two decades, before returning in 1996 with a three-man delegation. It has participated in every subsequent edition of the Summer Paralympics, but has never taken part in the Winter Paralympics.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Peru". Businessanddisability.org. Retrieved 2016-05-02.
  2. ^ Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática 2014, p. 9.
  3. ^ Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática 2014, p. 13.
  4. ^ Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática 2014, p. 15.
  5. ^ Quarmby, Katharine (2016-06-23). "Disabled people are frustrated at being denied the chance to work". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-06-13.
  6. ^ Marcano, Alex (30 November 2015). "Sacred Valley's intercultural school". Living in Peru. Retrieved 2017-06-15.
  7. ^ a b c Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática 2014, p. 27.
  8. ^ a b Mental Disability Rights International 2004, p. 2.
  9. ^ Bojorquez, Flor (5 July 2016). "Peru's new labor standard for the disabled". Peru This Week. Retrieved 2017-06-13.
  10. ^ Brink, Susan (18 December 2016). "How Is The World Treating People With Disabilities?". NPR. Retrieved 2017-06-27.
  11. ^ a b "Peru: Persons with Disabilities | Global Legal Monitor". Library of Congress. 2009-09-09. Retrieved 2017-06-13.
  12. ^ Mental Disability Rights International 2004, p. iii.
  13. ^ a b ""I Want to be a Citizen Just like Any Other"". Human Rights Watch. 2012-05-15. Retrieved 2017-06-13.
  14. ^ Mental Disability Rights International 2004, p. 3.
  15. ^ a b "Peru launches tech jobs network aimed at disabled people, low-income women". Andina. 19 January 2017. Retrieved 2017-06-15.
  16. ^ Mental Disability Rights International 2004, p. vii.
  17. ^ O’Shea, Michele S.; Maziel Girón, J.; Cabrera, Lilia; Lescano, Andrés G.; Taren, Douglas L. (2012-12-01). "Public perceptions of intellectual disability in a shantytown community in Lima, Peru". International Health. 4 (4): 253–259. doi:10.1016/j.inhe.2012.07.001. ISSN 1876-3413. PMC 3524994. PMID 23268202.
  18. ^ "Paralympic Results & Historical Records - Peru". Paralympic.org. Retrieved 2016-11-01.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]