Disney Wonder

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Disney Wonder logo.svg
Prince George Wharf in Nassau Harbor (Disney Wonder).jpg
Disney Wonder docked at Nassau.
History
 Bahamas
Name: Disney Wonder
Owner: The Walt Disney Company
Operator: Disney Cruise Line
Port of registry:  Bahamas[1]
Ordered: 1995
Builder: Fincantieri Marghera shipyard, Italy[2]
Laid down: May 5, 1997
Launched: February 23, 1998
Sponsored by: Tinkerbell and Mickey Mouse
Completed: June 18, 1999
Maiden voyage: August 1999[2]
In service: 1999–present
Identification:IMO number9126819
Status: Not in service
General characteristics
Class and type: Magic-class (Disney) cruise ship[2]
Tonnage: 83,000 GT[2]
Length: 964 ft (294 m)[2]
Beam: 106 ft (32 m)[2]
Draft: 25.3 ft (7.7 m)[3]
Decks: 11
Installed power: 43,000 kW (57,600 hp)
Propulsion: Diesel-Electric; *5 × Sulzer 16ZAV40S; two shafts
Speed:
  • Cruising 21.5 knots (39.8 km/h; 24.7 mph),
  • maximum 23.5 knots (43.5 km/h; 27.0 mph)[3]
Capacity: 2,400 passengers[2]
Crew: 945

Disney Wonder is a cruise ship operated by Disney Cruise Line. She was the second ship to join the Disney fleet on entering service in 1999. Wonder is of the same class as Disney Magic. The interior of Disney Wonder is decorated in the Art Nouveau style, in contrast to her sister ship, Disney Magic which is decorated in the Art Deco style. Both ships have 11 public decks, can accommodate 2,400 passengers in 875 staterooms, and have a crew of approximately 950. Disney Wonder was built in the year following completion of Disney Magic. As of 2015, Disney Wonder sails various North American itineraries on a seasonal basis. From early September to late October 2016, the ship underwent dry dock in Cadiz, Spain where she had many new dining, entertainment, and accommodation enhancements.

History[edit]

Disney Wonder in Puerto Vallarta

Disney had cruise ship designs drawn up by February 1994.[4] Disney Cruise Line in 1995 commissioned Disney Magic and Disney Wonder from Fincantieri in Italy.[2] She was laid down on May 5, 1997, launched on February 23, 1998, and completed on June 18, 1999.[5] The ship's godmother was Disney character Tinkerbell (who only spoke with bell sounds), and Mickey Mouse (voiced by Wayne Allwine) gave the ship's blessing in English.[6][7] Wonder entered into service in August 1999.[2]

Disney Wonder originally sailed three- and four-night cruises to The Bahamas. In 2011, Disney Dream took over these itineraries. Since then, the Disney Wonder has been sailing a variety of itineraries that include stops in Alaska, the Mexican Riviera, Hawaii, the Caribbean, and passages through the Panama Canal.

Rebecca Coriam, a 24-year-old crew member, was last seen by one of Disney Wonder's security cameras having an apparently upsetting telephone conversation in the early morning hours of March 22, 2011, before apparently disappearing the next day. It was the first such incident in the history of Disney Cruise Lines.[8]

With the arrival of Disney Dream in 2011, Disney Wonder was relocated to Los Angeles under a two-year contract with a three-year extension with the port.[9]

On January 10, 2013, the ship made her first-call ceremony in Miami. Cruises while stationed in Miami would consist of four- and five-night itineraries to the Bahamas and Western Caribbean with stops in Cozumel, Mexico; Disney's private island, Castaway Cay; Grand Cayman; Key West and Nassau, Bahamas. The Disney Wonder returned in April 2013 to Vancouver for Alaskan cruises.[10]

The ship was dry docked for an overhaul at the Navantia shipyard in Cadiz, Spain[11] in September 2016 until October 23, 2016. Wonder was then stationed out of Galveston, Texas starting November 10, 2016.[12]

In October 2018, Disney Cruise Line began showing Disney at Sea with D23, a 30-minute entertainment news show that covers the many Disney subsidiaries with input from D23, starting with Disney Wonder.[13]

A cruise in spring 2020 was shortened by the COVID-19 pandemic. The ship arrived at the Port of San Diego on March 19, 2020, where 1,980 passengers disembarked; there were no reports that any had flu-like symptoms. By April 5, 38 crew members had reportedly tested positive to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, according to a report by Cruise Law News based on discussions with unnamed individuals on the ship. Disney, however, told other news media that none of the crew had tested positive. A passenger who disembarked at San Diego on March 20 reported that no health screening activities, such as the asking of health-related questions or the taking of temperatures, had occurred upon disembarkation, and that the only health screening that occurred was during the check-in process two weeks prior.[14] After disembarking the passengers in March the ship was placed under a no-sail order, effective through July, by the Centers for Disease Control. As of May 2020 Disney Wonder and two other cruise ships were still at anchor offshore from San Diego. Approximately 700 crew were reportedly still aboard Disney Wonder.[15]

Recreation[edit]

For children (3-12) there are the Oceaneers Club, and the Oceaneers Lab. The Club provides a slide, multiple TVs, dress up clothing, and counselor-led activities. The Lab provides video games, computers, cooking classes, and TV time geared towards the older end of that age bracket. Children receive an RFID badge when registered that allows the cruise staff to know the child's location in the activity areas.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Inquiry call over vanished cruise woman". BBC. October 30, 2015. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Saunders, Aaron (October 1, 2013). Giants of the Seas: The Ships that Transformed Modern Cruising. Seaforth Publishing. pp. 76–78, 179. ISBN 978-1848321724. Retrieved May 4, 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Ship Facts". Disney Cruise Line. Archived from the original on May 29, 2008.
  4. ^ Dezern, Craig (February 20, 1994). "Disney Contemplating Creation Of Cruise Line". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved May 4, 2016.
  5. ^ "Disney Wonder (9126819)". Miramar Ship Index. Retrieved September 10, 2019.
  6. ^ MainStInsider (April 9, 2013). "Tiggerific Tuesday Trivia: Disney Cruise Ship Godmothers". Main St. Insider. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  7. ^ Christening the Disney Wonder (1999), retrieved February 12, 2020
  8. ^ Ronson, Jon (November 11, 2011). "Rebecca Coriam: lost at sea". The Guardian. Retrieved November 25, 2015.
  9. ^ Garcia, Jason (March 30, 2009). "Disney will homeport a ship in Los Angeles". Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on May 24, 2011. Retrieved March 30, 2009.
  10. ^ "Disney Wonder Hosts First-Call Ceremony in Miami". Cruise Industry News.com. January 10, 2013. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  11. ^ Tribou, Richard (October 26, 2016). "Upgraded Disney Wonder headed back to the U.S." Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  12. ^ Sloan, Gene (June 2, 2016). "Disney Wonder makeover to bring new pool zone, pub". USA Today. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  13. ^ Tuttle, Brittani (October 16, 2018). "Disney Cruise Line debuts new live news show, 'Disney at Sea with D23'". Attractions Magazine. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  14. ^ "Thirty-Eight Crew Members on Disney Wonder Reportedly Test Positive for COVID-19". Cruise Law News. April 5, 2020. Retrieved April 10, 2020.
  15. ^ Weisberg, Lori. "Cruise workers are leaving San Diego". San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved May 29, 2020.

External links[edit]