List of named devils in Dungeons & Dragons

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Within the Dungeons & Dragons role playing game materials, a number of devils are given characteristics or roles within the story lines. This is a list of the devils that have appeared in the various materials as characters that are specifically named.

Some of the characters are based on devils in folklore traditions, while some were created specifically for the game.

Contents

Abigor[edit]

Abigor is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Abigor appears as a large hairless humanoid with small horns, black hooves, a forked tail and ochre skin. He has large crimson bat wings and a loud, bellowing voice. Abigor is a vassal of Baalzebul, commanding 60 companies of cornugons (horned devils). He was nearly slain by Nisroch, for which Nisroch was sentenced to become one of the Rabble of Devilkin.

Abigor first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Abigor was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Abigor was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Adonides[edit]

Adonides is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Adonides appears as a young, long-haired, darkly handsome man of giant stature. He has unusual glittering black eyes and a fanged grin. The hair hides two small horns; Adonides wears robes to hide his short forked tail and scarlet torso. Adonides is a vassal of Mephistopheles, serving as Mephistopheles's steward.

Adonides first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Adonides was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Adramalech[edit]

Adramalech is a powerful Duke of Hell, serving Asmodeus as his chancellor, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Adramalech somewhat resembles an elderly human man with a gray beard. His eyes are cold and wet, changing in hue according to his mood and only his small, crimson horns and forked tail mark him obviously as a devil. His loose, flowing, green, purple, russet, or black robes conceal his crimson, scaly back and his slimy, yellow-green belly. Adramalech is the chancellor of Asmodeus and a rival of Asmodeus's inquisitor, Phongor.

Adramalech first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Adramalech was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] Adramalech was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[5]

Agares[edit]

Agares is a Duke of Hell in the service of Levistus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. There is also a vestige available to members of the Binder class in third edition named Agares, but it represents a different individual. Agares takes a form resembling that of an ancient, human man, his voice shaky and frail. His feet are reptilian and covered in gray scales, and his gray-bearded face is a ruddy human tone that deepens to a deep scarlet on his deformed, knotted torso (although this isn't normally evident, as his robes reach to his neck). His tail is stumpy, and covered in the same gray scales as his feet. His horns are gray, too. He has watery red eyes and red, clawlike nails. He leans on a staff shod with iron. Agares commands 31 companies of bone devils. Each company includes 333 soldiers.

Agares first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Agares was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3] Agares was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[5]

Alastor the Grim[edit]

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, Alastor (/əˈlæsˌtɔːr/ ə-LAS-tor)[7] is a pit fiend, a devil in the service of Asmodeus. He is known by the epithet the Grim and his titles include Executioner of Hell. Alastor is said to be the greatest pit fiend of them all. His wings are broken and his body is covered in scars. His strength is like a storm giant's. Alastor is a vassal of Asmodeus. There are those who claim that if Asmodeus could choose only one companion, it would be Alastor the Grim. Alastor first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Amduscias[edit]

Amduscias is a duke in the service of Tiamat, and leads 29 companies of abishai. He lives on Avernus, the first layer of Baator. He is famous for his long memory, and almost as well known for his cunning strategies. He has also earned the moniker “Reconciliator of Foes,” by being a skillful actor and negotiator. Tiamat often employs him to mediate disputes between devils and dragons. Amduscias is also tasked with keeping the Rabble of Devilkin in line. Amduscias is inspired by the real-world Amdusias.

Amduscias usually appears as a 9-foot-tall (2.7 m) hawk-headed man wearing dark red or black robes, and never wears armor. He can also change into two distinct forms. He can resemble a dirty-yellow unicorn with eyes of flame, and a purple horn that causes terrible bleeding wounds. He can bolt from a standing start, and some say that whenever horses spook or gallop uncontrollably, Amduscias has affected them. He also likes to take the form of a dire wolf with a prehensile tail like that of a serpent.

Amduscias prefers to fight in his wolf form. He can use all of his attacks on as many targets as he wishes. One favorite tactic is to constrict a foe with his tail and immerse the victim in water to drown, batter the victim against a rock, or use whatever advantage he can gain with the tail. In human form, he dual-wields two small weapons of his choice (such as daggers or darts), and likes to point at a victim to affect with his fear ability. Amduscias can speak with any creature that has a language. Amduscias is a servant of Tiamat, for whom he leads 29 companies of abishai. Each company contains 333 abishai each. Amduscias originally served Zariel, the previous lord of Avernus, but was granted into the service of Tiamat in exchange for her aid in guarding the entrance to the second layer of Hell. This arrangement continued unchanged with the reign of Bel.

Amduscias first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Amduscias was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[8] Amduscias was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Asmodeus[edit]

Asmodeus (/ˌæzmˈdəs/ az-mo-DAY-əs or /æzˈmdiəs/ az-MOH-dee-əs)[7] is the Lord of Hell/Baator and the Overlord of the lesser Dukes of Hell. Through all four editions of Dungeons & Dragons, Asmodeus is depicted as the strongest, most cunning, and most handsome of all devils. He is typically described as appearing as a giant human, over 13 feet tall, with dark skin and hair, red eyes, handsome features, and small horns on his forehead. He dresses in regal finery of unimaginable expense; a single article of clothing worn by Asmodeus is worth more money than an average nation will spend on food in a year. Beneath his clothing, Asmodeus' body is covered in bloody wounds which he sustained when he fell from the Upper Planes. His wounds ooze blood daily, and any drop of blood which touches the ground grows into a powerful devil.He is described in the Book of Vile Darkness as a "calm, chillingly reasonable" being with a modest appearance that hides his true power.

According to the Guide to Hell, though he has worshipers and does occasion to grant them clerical powers, his true identity as Ahriman makes him loath to expand his cult. This is because his true motivation is to spread atheism through the multiverse and make all believe that "gods" are not divine at all, but beings who have achieved great power. In his plan, when belief fails, the outer planes will cease to exist. As Ahriman the evil lawmaker of the whole of the cosmos and unfettered by belief himself, he can then remold the multiverse perfectly according to his desires, and this time not having to share in its creation with Jazirian: the good creator of the multiverse's orderly structure. There will be no remnant of chaos as a result, or any missing rules in this future outer ring of planes, which will be the exclusive domain of Asmodeus.[9]

Asmodeus first appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977).[10][11] He has been featured in books into the 4th edition as an evil god in the Dungeon Masters Guide (2008).[12] His backstory for this edition is expanded in the supplements Manual of the Planes, The Plane Above: Secrets of the Astral Sea, and Demonomicon. His origins are explicitly defined as the leader of a rebellion. His fictional biography has been retconned to justify changes from previous editions' settings, in both the default setting and in the Forgotten Realms.[13] He also appears in Eberron as the undisputed master of the Nine Hells.[14] Asmodeus appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 23.[15]

His appearance in Dungeons & Dragons was cited as evidence for Satanism in the game by Pat Pulling and Kathy Cawthon in their 1989 book The Devil's Web.[16] The inclusion of Asmodeus and other Judeo-Christian devils in Dungeons & Dragons is discussed in the pages of Pegasus magazine as well.[17]

Family[edit]

Asmodeus' chief consort, before her death, was a devil named Bensozia. Together they had a daughter named Glasya, who now rules over the sixth layer of Baator. The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Asmodeus on Nessus. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Adramalech — Chancellor of Hell, Keeper of Records (DR76).
  • Alastor the Grim, pit fiend — Executioner.
  • Baalberith (/ˈblbərɪθ/ BAYL-bər-ith[7]), pit fiend — Major domo.
  • Bensozia — Consort of Asmodeus, Queen of Hell (Deceased) (DR76).
  • Buer — 15 companies of pit fiends (DR76).
  • Bune — 30 companies of cornugons (DR76).
  • Glasya - Daughter of Asmodeus and Bensozia, former Mistress of the Erinyes, now Lord of the Sixth (DR76).
  • Martinet, pit fiend — Constable.
  • Morax — 9 companies of pit fiends (DR76).
  • Phongor — Inquisitor of Hell (DR76).
  • Rimmon — 5 companies of gelugons (DR76).
  • The Spark Hunters - Lord Asmodeus's personal guard of 13 hamatula rangers/mortal hunters who capture and/or slay mortals who draw their master's ire.
  • Zagum — 30 companies of hamatula (DR76).

Azazel[edit]

Azazel is an outcast Duke of Hell, one of the Rabble of Devilkin, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Azazel first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Revisited" in Dragon #91 (November 1984).[18] Azazel "the Serpent," is extremely conceited and scornful. Cast out of two successive dukedoms for his unbearable behaviour, Azazel constantly plots to regain his former position. He always wear gaudy jewelry and regal clothing. Azazel is a scaly-skinned humanoid with a serpent's head and large scaled wings.

Baalphegor[edit]

Baalphegor is the consort of Mephistopheles, the arch-devil currently ruling Cania, the 8th layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. Baalphegor's name first appears in a list of unique devils compiled by Gary Gygax in "New denizens of devildom: A partial preview of Monster Manual II" in Dragon #75 (July 1983).[19] Baalphegor is described in Dragon #76 as personally attractive, "charming in manner and artful in thought".[1] She is described as a sleek and curvaceous human-appearing she-devil with cinnamon-colored skin, ruby-red eyes, forked tail, as well as slim, delicate leathery wings. She appears young and carefree but when angered, her eyes glow with flames and her usually musical voice bes comes very harsh. She is noted in the article as being only five and a half feet in height.[1]

Baalzebul[edit]

Baalzebul is an Arch-Devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), also called the "Lord of the Flies." Baalzebul first appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977).[11] Baalzebul's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[20] Prior to the Reckoning of Hell, Baalzebul took on the appearance of a tall, dark-skinned humanoid with compound eyes resembling a fly. However, as a result of his role in the Reckoning, Asmodeus transformed Baalzebul, who now appears as a giant slug-like creature which trails feces and garbage wherever he goes. Flies crawl over his body at all times, and his arms are tiny and malformed.[3] Baalzebul is the sworn enemy of both Mephistopheles and Dispater and would do anything to oppose them. He also has a tentative alliance with Belial, whose aid he would probably come to if he could discover some advantage in doing so. It is worth noting that although he openly plots against Mephistopheles he also secretly nurses a hate for Asmodeus for cursing him with his current appearance. Baalzebul's consorts are Baftis and Lilith.[4]

Baalzephon[edit]

Baalzephon (/ˈblzɪˌfɒn/ BAYL-zi-fon)[21] is a fictional devil in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game.

Baalzephon is one of the Dark Eight, the pit fiend generals of the Blood War. He is the former prime minister of Dispater.

Baalzephon in Greyhawk[edit]

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting, Baalzephon has strong links to the Great Kingdom and the House of Naelax. His involvement with the House of Naelax dates from around the 440s CY, when Ivenzen, the father of Overking Ivid I made contact with Baalzephon, and made a deal with him. It was he who instructed Ivenzen in the manufacture of the Malachite Throne and helped the House of Naelax attain power in exchange for expelling all demons from Aerdi lands and binding Ivenzen and his heirs and descendent souls to him for a period of 888 years.

Just prior to the Greyhawk Wars, Baalzephon masqueraded as a minor god, "Baalzy," ostensibly a deity of wealth, power and prosperity. By 578 CY, Baalzephon's new faith had become one of only two tolerated religions in the Great Kingdom under Ivid V (the other one being the worship of Hextor), and was instituted as the official state religion of the Great Kingdom.

According to the unpublished Ivid the Undying, Baalzephon also had a hand in the creation of the animus undead through the intervention of his pit fiends and their cooperation with clerics of Hextor, as well as the use of a special artifact, the Casket of Abyssal Bone created by Baalzephon himself.

Creative origins[edit]

The name Baal-zephon means "lord of the north [side]" in Hebrew.

Baftis[edit]

Baftis is the consort to Baalzebul, the arch-devil currently ruling Maladomini, the seventh layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. She shares this title with Lilith, the former consort to viceroy Moloch, another arch-devil who was demoted upon the Reckoning of Hell. Subservient and very quiet, Baftis never acts without proper authorization. Extremely afraid of Baalzebul, she never calls attention to herself and always does what her master tells her to. A quite beautiful she-devil, Baftis has a crimson body with an ivory-white, luminescent back, spire-shaped horns, and unusual pale violet eyes. Unlike most other devils, she has no tail. She dislikes showing her back and hides it at all times with dark dresses. Her attitude is rather forbidding and uncommunicative.

Baftis's only act of faint rebellion was when Baalzebul built a city in Maladomini that was supposed to be perfect until he found a slight imperfection in the throne room. Thus, he commanded his court and the citizens to leave. Baftis, for once defied her master and refused to leave. Baalzebul cursed her and sealed her in the city, now a ghost town where no one lives but her. Baftis still holds the title of consort of the Lord of the Seventh but now has very little authority. Baalzebul has taken as second consort the strong-willed and loyal Lilith, his viceroy Moloch's former consort.

Baftis first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Baftis was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Balan[edit]

Balan is a Duke of Hell in Phelegethos and one of Belial's loyal supporters. Before the Reckoning of Hell, Balan was an ally of Bathym, a fellow duke in the service of Belial. After that conflict, however, Bathym shifted his alliance to Fierna, while Balan continued to support Belial first and foremost, as Belial had long helped him fulfill his unspeakable desires. More than any other baatezu, Bathym is now Balan's greatest enemy; Bathym hopes to increase Fierna's control over Phlegethos and his own position with it, while Balan desires to keep Belial as the power behind the throne. For a time, they were at least civil with one another, but as Fierna continues to assert herself, it looks as if Balan and Bathym may soon come to blows. Balan considers death to be a state of absolute order, and so strives to bring all others to that state. He strives for the deaths of demons first, then women, then everyone else. Balan commands 40 companies of bearded devils. Each company consists of 333 devils. He has no mortal followers.

Balan first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Balan was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3] Balan was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #360 (October 2007) in the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[22] Balan appears as a giant, yellow-skinned man with fierce black brows and a beard which grows in tufts. He has gray hooves and a body which darkens to scarlet about his legs and his forked tail. He typically wears only a leather weapon belt and girdle, and shuns armor. He has red or blue flaming eyes visible at some distance, and a hoarse voice. He wears a badge upon his belt depicting his own head next to a bull’s head and a ram’s head, as well as the heads of those he has slain. He tends to be incautious in his fights, charging in with twin axes.

Barbas[edit]

Barbas is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles; serving as Mephistopheles's chamberlain. Barbas appears as a giant, bearded man with large lips and an enormous belly. He wears voluminous robes, which conceal his forked tail, hooves, and crimson skin covered with thick, oily black hair. Barbas is lazy and gross-bodied but snake-quick in battle.

Barbas first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Barbas was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Barbas was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Barbatos[edit]

Barbatos is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Barbatos appears as a bearded, horned man-like giant with crimson skin, black hooves, and a tail. His eyes are green, and he talks with a rich, persuasive voice. Barbatos is a vassal of Baalzebul, serving as Baalzebul's marshall.

Barbatos first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Barbatos was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Bathym[edit]

Bathym is a Duke of Hell in the service of Fierna, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Bathym first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Bathym has black-hued eyes, black hooves, and black nails. His skin, horns and tail are a dead, fishbelly-white color. Bathym’s forked tail is short and curled like a pig’s; he is most sensitive about it and keeps it concealed. When angry, Bathym hisses like a snake when he speaks. Bathym is known as "the Black Duke" for the color of the armor he wears. He covers his face with a full horned helm and covers his armor with a voluminous black cloak. His black spiked mace bleeds darkness. Bathym displays prudent caution and diabolical cunning in battle, letting his mount, the terrible half-devil nightmare Fell Wind, do most of the fighting.

Bel[edit]

Bel the pit fiend is the Arch-Devil currently in charge of Avernus, the First Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. He is nicknamed "The Pretender" by others of his kin. Bel's name, like many other arch fiends of Baator, is inspired namewise by a real life mythological figure, the Semitic god Bel. Bel sports the typical features of any pit fiend. He is a huge, square bodied creature with red, scaly skin and a gaping maw instead of a mouth. He also wears a belt made out of decapitated, still-living angel heads. His avatar appears as a burly humanoid with a jutting chin, powerful arms, and a slightly reddish complexion. His brooding scowl reveals the barely controlled rage beneath.

In first edition AD&D, the ruler of Avernus was said to be Tiamat, although this has since been retconned. Bel was first described as a pit fiend servant of Dispater in Dragon #75,[23] and the 1st edition Monster Manual II (1983).[24] He was mentioned briefly as a commander of the armies of Avernus in the Monstrous Compendium Outer Planes Appendix (1991).[25] He was mentioned in this context, described as a servant of the layer's unnamed lord, in Planes of Law (1995),[26] and given primary control over the Third Command of the Blood War in Hellbound (1996).[27] He was first identified as Avernus's ruler in Dragon #223 (November 1995), a role he retained in later appearances. That source explained that he had wrested control of the layer from the unnamed previous ruler (noted only to not be Tiamat) thousands of years ago.[28] His predecessor was first named as Zariel in Guide to Hell (1999).[9] Bel is detailed as the lord of Avernus in third edition in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002),[29] and again in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[30] The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Bel is still the lord of Avernus. However, the 5th edition Monster Manual notes Bel as a former lord of Avernus, with Zariel the current lord.

Relationships[edit]

Thousands of years ago, Bel wrested Avernus from its previous ruler, Zariel, whom he once served as her warlord. It is said she still lies bound beneath Bel's fortress as he slowly siphons power from her. Before he served Zariel, he served Dispater, commanding three companies of horned devils known as the Iron Guard. He has no support among the other archdevils, but he is held in high favor among the Dark Eight, an advantage that is not to be overlooked. He has responsibilities to the Dark Eight that Asmodeus has forced him to continue as a condition for allowing him to ascend to mastery over his layer. It is thought that Asmodeus only allowed his coup to succeed because Bel's responsibilities leading the Third Command in the Blood War meant he would have much less time for scheming than his predecessor. Bel has extensive dealings with Tiamat, who is mocked by some as Bel's scaly watchdog.

Bel has granted the Dukes of Hell Malphas, Amduscias, and Goap into the service of Tiamat. As a result, no nobles serve him personally. He is served by two horned devil fighters, Yeddikadir and Nalebranc, and the Dark Eight function as Dukes of Hell for him to some extent. These pit fiends include Baalzephon, Corin, Dagos, Furcas, Pearza, Zapan, Zaebos, and Zimmimar.

As well as commanding the armies of Avernus, Bel has primary control over the Third Command, one of the three divisions of Hell's armies commanded by Dagos of the Dark Eight. In this task, his co-generals are the ice devils Meritos and Hanariel. The Third Command is made up mostly of infantry and expendable ground troops, whose primary task is to wear down their demonic foes through attrition and superior tactics. For the most part, the soldiers of the Third Command are mindless lemures and nupperibos, but the command also includes a large number of lesser devils such as abishai, spinagons, and lower-ranked bearded devils.

Realm[edit]

Bel rules the whole of Avernus, except for the realms of the gods who dwell there such as Tiamat, Bargrivyek, and Kurtulmak. However, as preoccupied as he is with the Blood War, much of Avernus remains wild, and exiled nobles known as the Rabble of Devilkin roam its blasted and scarred wastes with little supervision.

His center of power is the Bronze Citadel, an ever-expanding fortress that serves as Hell's principal bulwark against demonic invasion. It currently consists of 14 concentric rings sprawling across 600 square miles (1,600 km2) of territory, pressing against the Stigmaris Mountains. Within the complex, each of the Dark Eight maintain households for when they need to consult with Bel.

History[edit]

Bel originally served as a duke in the service of Dispater. He was given command over the armies of Avernus after enacting a devastating maneuver in the Blood War that became known as the Four-Cross, in which he ostensibly betrayed the devils to join the side of the demons, then rejoined the diabolic side of the war only to betray them a second time, then fought with the demons for a year and a day before finally enacting a devastating betrayal that crippled the forces of the Abyss for a decade.

Bel took rulership of Avernus some time following the Reckoning of Hell, after he betrayed his mistress, Zariel, the former Duchess of Avernus about whom virtually nothing is known. Bel is a cruel, violent and very blunt warlord whose main concern is the Blood War, an unending conflict between the chaotic evil tanar'ris from the Abyss and the lawful evil baatezu of Baator. As Avernus is actually the battlefield upon which the daily fighting occurs, Bel is in charge of keeping the demons at bay and keeping safe the harvesting of the evil souls that come to the Nine Hells. This makes him the archdevil who most often deals directly with mortals and non-baatezu. Although Bel delights in corrupting souls as much as others of his kind do, he is very realistic and he knows he can at best contain the invaders but not utterly destroy them, as they fairly outnumber his own armies. Thus, any mortal that offers him to lend a hand in the Blood War is welcome every now and then, and might be rewarded with the right to go further in the Nine Hells or simply to have his/her life spared. Bel is also the Lord who most often deals with the outcast dukes of Baator, a group of demoted devils that lurk in Avernus and are continually scheming to regain their lost status.

Bel actually gets his power from removing and consuming pieces of flesh from Zariel herself who is currently imprisoned and continually tortured in the basement of the Bronze Citadel where the Lord of the First has his headquarters. This fact got him nicknamed "The Pretender" by the other Arch-Lords who greatly despise him. However, Bel is very appreciated by the Overlord of Baator, Asmodeus, and the Dark Eight, for his skills in battle and his efficiency in the Blood War, as well as his spying abilities.

Other media[edit]

The Blood War miniature set featured a Pit Fiend as the most powerful creature in the Lawful Evil faction, if not the most powerful creature of the set. It came with an Epic stat card of 310 points. The card came with a very high armor class stat, along with spell resistance, a general DR, high attack power and a very powerful "meteor swarm" 9th level spell.

Bele[edit]

Bele is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bele first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bele was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bele appears as a tall, handsome, hollow-eyed man with ivory skin, a curling beard and pencil-thin mustache, a low, nasal voice, tiny horns, and long black robes. Beneath the robes are concealed a short forked tail, a crimson-skinned lower torso, and a belt bearing Bele's black rod of office and a dagger of venom. When Bele disrobes, his leathery wings can spread to a surprisingly large (20-foot) wingspan.

Relationships[edit]

Bele is a vassal of Mephistopheles, serving as Mephistopheles's justiciar.

Belial[edit]

Belial (/biˈləl/ bee-LY-ul[7] or /ˈbliəl/ BEE-lee-əl)[31] is an Arch-Devil of Hell (commonly Baator in 2nd edition versions of the game), lord of the Fourth Hell, Phlegethos. He retained his rule after the Reckoning of Hell, though he now shares this responsibility with his daughter Fierna who serves as his mouthpiece (and possible lover). He has designs on the Fifth and Sixth levels of Hell. His symbols are a two-pronged ranseur and a handsome male face with dark features and small horns. A more elaborate symbol of Belial involves red, glowing eyes over a two-pronged ranseur, surrounded by a red tail with a wicked barb.

Creative origins[edit]

Belial, whose name has been translated to mean "worthlessness," is based on the demon from Christian and Jewish apocrypha of the same name.

Publication history[edit]

Belial was first detailed in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983).[32] He also appeared in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[33] Belial's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[34]

Belial did not initially appear in 2nd edition, and in the Planescape line the lord of Phlegethos was instead Fierna. Eventually, it was revealed that Belial and Fierna now shared rulership of Phlegethos, in Guide to Hell (1999).[9]

In third edition, Belial appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[35] Belial was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Belial and Fierna are still the lords of Phlegethos.[36]

Description[edit]

Belial is said to have both the most handsome and diabolic appearance of all the devils. He is a tall, dark humanioid with small horns on his head, dresses always in regal finery and carries a ranseur. He is handsome and sexual, with large slanted eyes that smolder red.

Relationships[edit]

Belial is the father of Fierna, through his consort Naome. He has an alliance with Telchur, Oerth's god of winter, as is said that he aided Telchur in Vatun's imprisonment. Belial has a secret alliance lasting centuries with Baalzebul, Lord of the Seventh Hell. Before the Reckoning, he was also allied with Moloch and Zariel. Two of the original members of the Dark Eight, Zaebos and Zapan, originally worked for him before taking on their present positions. He is a rival of Levistus, and was a rival of the Hag Countess before her demise. Since the ascension of Glasya, he has chosen a "wait and see" approach.

The bulk of Belial's scheming currently involves trying to keep tabs on his daughter without provoking her to straying further from his control. He is growing concerned that he is losing his grip on his power. Gazra is jealous and hateful toward Belial, but keeps those feelings well hidden.

Vassals[edit]

The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Belial on Phlegethos. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Balan - 40 companies of barbazu (DR75)
  • Bathym - 30 companies of hamatula (DR75)
  • Chamo - Legate (DR75)
  • Gaziel - 11 companies of osyluths (DR75)
  • Naome - Consort of Belial (DR75)
  • Zaebos, pit fiend - Lieutenant, one of the Dark Eight
  • Zapan, pit fiend - 4 companies of cornugons, one of the Dark Eight

Realm and clergy[edit]

Belial, currently the power behind the throne in Phlegethos, rules from his Hall of One Thousand Sighs and Screams within Fierna's tower of crystalline stone. Belial teaches his followers to revel in the pleasures and pains of the flesh. He delights in manipulating mortals. He also enjoys killing, craving the sensation of hot blood splashing against his body. That said, he is not a fool, and knows when to cut and run. Members of Belial's small cult devote themselves to trickery, seduction, domination, and secrets. They are generally more interested in personal than political corruption. Clerics of Belial sport thin, well-groomed beards (if male), dress in red and black, and wield the ranseur. Male clerics predominate. Temples to Belial feature circular altars and black and red candles, in elegant towers and halls. The decor is both understated and tasteful.

Apocrypha[edit]

In "The Politics of Hell" in Dragon #28, Belial was originally the devil in charge of politicians, the supreme commander of Hell's armies, and Satan's personal lieutenant, gaining the animosity of the other devils and the esteem of Satan when he acted to discipline the others for minor acts of rebellion. As a result, Belial was the only archdevil who remained on the side of Satan after Baalzebul's coup, and Belial became exiled along with his former master. In this version of the story (published years before Belial was officially introduced to the game in the Monster Manual II), Belial has remained exiled ever since. However, the armies of Hell have remained loyal to him, and Belial retained his influence over politicians and bureaucrats for some time, having kept his former contacts. He was described in that article as a beautiful angelic being riding a chariot of fire.[37]

In Legions of Hell by Chris Pramas, Belial was a fallen celestial (a former virtue, equivalent to a deva) like Baalzebul, thus explaining their natural alliance, and like the latter devil was treated as an upstart by Dispater and Mephistopheles, who were "born of the baatezu race." It says "Only Asmodeus is a better liar than Belial." His servants in that book include Ariel, a winged warrior with the head of a lion who oversees the tortures of the Fourth Hell; Antaia, the Witch Queen; Balan, Master of the Infernal Hunt; and Naamah, Contessa of Duplicity.[38]

Belial in other media[edit]

In Neverwinter Nights, a demon known as Belial, Lord of Fire makes an appearance. Belial appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 13.[15]

Bensozia[edit]

Bensozia is a fictional devil for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. She is the consort of Asmodeus, ruler of Baator. She is also referred to as the Queen of Hell.[1][39] Bensozia's name first appears in a list in "New denizens of devildom: A partial preview of Monster Manual II" in Dragon #75 (1983).[19] Bensozia is described in Dragon #76 as a tall statuesque devil with a human-like appearance. She has long white hair, large glistening black eyes, scarlet skin, large brown hooves, and a forked tail. She bears a brass scepter and wears loose black robes with a scarlet silk lining within, and a diadem of beaten gold set with large rubies.[1]

Bifrons[edit]

Bifrons is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bifrons first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bifrons was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bifrons appears as a wingless, gray-skinned and heavily muscled devil with a humanoid torso, and a snake-like lower body from the hip down, with no legs. He has stubby horns on his brow, and totally white, slanted eyes, large nostrils and mouth, and a deep, rumbling voice.

Relationships[edit]

Bifrons is a vassal of Mephistopheles, commanding 26 companies of gelugons (ice devils).

Bileth[edit]

Bileth is a Duke of Hell, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bileth first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bileth was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2]

Bileth was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bileth appears as a large man clad in gilded coat of plate. He uses weapons only in a pinch, preferring to fight with his fists backed up by his massive strength. He is bearded, crimson-skinned, and has horns and hooves. He is tailless, but has large black bat-like leathery wings. He can also breathe fire, but he will do this only if angered or hard-pressed.

Relationships[edit]

Bileth was originally a vassal of Moloch by appointment from Baalzebul, serving as Moloch's tribune. He served the Hag Countess when she overthrew Moloch, but when Glasya took over Malbolge, Bileth was recalled to Baalzebul's service.

Buer[edit]

Buer is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Buer first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Buer was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Physically, Buer resembles a bariaur with gleaming silver skin and white hair. His eyes, horns, and hooves are scarlet. From his hips grow six 10' long prehensile tentacles, dripping with acidic bile.

Relationships[edit]

Buer is a vassal of Asmodeus, commanding 15 companies of pit fiends.

Bune[edit]

Bune is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bune first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bune was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bune generally resembles a cornugon in appearance, but his scaled body is green in hue (coppery on the belly and loins), and his talons are silvery in color. Bune's head, however, is human—with dog-like furry ears and a great griffon-like beak. His voice is high-pitched and lilting, although he will screech if he becomes infuriated, and he is an excellent mimic of other beings.

Relationships[edit]

Bune is a vassal of Asmodeus, commanding 30 companies of cornugons (horned devils).

Chamo[edit]

Chamo is a Duke of Hell in the service of Belial, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Chamo first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6]

Chamo was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2]

Chamo was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Chamo appears as a white-haired, middle-aged man with big brown eyes. He has upward-pointing horns, black hooves, a forked tail, and black bat-like wings. His skin is scarlet, darkening to blue on his long-nailed hands. He usually wears loose black robes with a high stand-up collar. Chamo is a vassal of Belial, acting as Belial's legate.

Cozbinaer[edit]

Cozbinaer or Cozbi, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, was the consort of the demoted lord of the 5th layer of Baator, Geryon. As of Fiendish Codex II, Cozbi was destroyed as a result of Geryon's demotion along with bailiff Gorson and the pit-fiend Fecor.

Creative origins[edit]

Cozbinaer's name is inspired by the name of a pagan priestess of Jewish mythology named Cozbi.

Publication history[edit]

Cozbi first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6]

Cozbinaer appears in the adventure A Paladin in Hell (1998).[40]

Cozbi was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Cozbinaer is described as an exquisitely beautiful she-devil with fair skin, long green hair and a chalk-white body gradually reddening from the chest down. She also had long black nails, a slim pointed tail she would hang over one arm, and vampire-like fangs for canine teeth. Her eyes were scarlet.

History[edit]

Cozbinaer was perhaps the weakest and quietest of all Hell's duchesses. However, she took being called "Cozbi" by anyone not of her kin as a major offense. Any non-baatezu that did so was never seen alive again. She was extremely loyal to Geryon, and her devotion bordered closely to what mortals know as love. However, this very behaviour ended up being her demise, as did Geryon's faithfulness to Asmodeus.

Cozbinaer was exiled to Avernus along with her master and his loyal lieutenant Amon upon the Reckoning of Hell. As soon as they entered the layer, Geryon's followers were attacked by Levistus's followers who slew the major part of Geryon's court. Cozbinaer has been horribly wounded during these conflicts and then appeared as a zombie-like harridan whose body was covered in scars, skin grafts and withered flesh. Though she should have died long ago from her wounds, she was kept alive through profane magic and hellish technology and spent her time in a glass chamber where a poisonous yellow gas was funneled by tubes. If she had to leave this room, she wore a bizarre armored suit that contained the same gas, which was deadly to anyone but her. The location of the room itself was unknown.

The circumstances of her death are yet to be revealed. She either couldn't sustain herself any longer or someone eventually found the room where she laid and destroyed the apparatus.

Dispater[edit]

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Dispater is an Arch-Devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), and the Lord of the Iron City of Dis. Dispater was one of the few arch-devils that retained his position after the Reckoning of Hell. Dispater is lord of Dis, the Second Plane of Hell. His symbol is a fortress embossed on a reinforced metal shield.

Dispater stands at seven feet tall, is evilly handsome and looks human except for his small horns, tail, and cloven left hoof. Dispater is incredibly cautious to the point of paranoia. He always has at least nine different back up plans for any situation. He is also always polite and calm even in very troubling and stressful situations. Dispater's iron tower is itself a powerful magic item which makes Dispater almost impossible to kill as long as he remains inside it. Dispater never leaves his tower unless forced, most notably for the yearly council with Asmodeus which all the Archdevils are required to attend.

Dispater first appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977).[11] Dispater's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Dispater did not initially appear in 2nd edition, but he did feature prominently in the Planescape line, particularly in the adventure Fires of Dis (1995).[41] His history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[42] In third edition, Dispater appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[43] Dispater was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Dispater is still the lord of Dis.[36]

Relationships[edit]

Dispater is the sworn enemy of Baalzebul and is allied with Mephistopheles and as such most of his plans focus on the destruction of Baalzebul. His consort is Lilis.

The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Dispater. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Alocer - 36 companies of erinyes (DR75).
  • Arioch - Avenger (DR75).
  • Biffant - Provost (DR75).
  • Bitru - 70 companies of erinyes (DR 75).
  • Lilis - Consort to Dispater (DR75).
  • Merodach - 21 companies of hamatula (DR75).
  • Talos the Triple Iron Golem - Ancient iron golem who serves Lord Dispater.
  • Titivilus - Messenger of Dispater, Nuncio (MM2).
  • Ustyhrin-Ja - Pleasure Devil Desciple who serves her master with fervor and leads his warrior harem.
  • Zaggutch - Pit fiend lieutenant (FoD).

The following beings once served in Dispater's court:

  • Baalzephon - Before the Reckoning of Hell, this pit fiend served Dispater as Prime Minister.
  • Bel - Before entering the service of Zariel on Avernus, Bel commanded three companies of horned devils known as the Iron Guard.

Realm[edit]

Dispater rules Dis, the Second Layer of Hell, from the Iron City of Dis.

Worshippers[edit]

Dispater's cult appeals to those who value stability as much as cruelty. They tend to build impregnable fortresses, carefully reviewing defensive protocol and possible escape plans. They include many hobgoblins, goblins, and similar humanoids.

Clergy[edit]

Clerics of Dispater wear gray clothing and conceal their faces behind iron masks. They wield heavy maces and are usually heavily armored. Disciples of Dispater verge on paranoia and are distrustful of all around them.

History[edit]

According to Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells, when Asmodeus created Baator, he, Mephistopheles, and Dispater were the first of the baatezu to set foot on the plane. Dispater has controlled Dis ever since.[4]

Thousands of years ago, Dispater helped broker the pact between Tiamat's red dragon consort Ephelomon and Gith, first leader of the githyanki. In return, he claimed Gith's soul, which he has kept imprisoned in his iron city ever since.

In the Reckoning, Dispater's legendary tower was the first to be attacked and was laid siege to by Zariel. However, Mammon managed to help Dispater beat the besieging army back and then they both invaded Maladomini to attack Baalzebul.

After the Reckoning, Dispater retained his position as ruler of Dis. He is still an ally of Mephistopheles and he, Mephistopheles, Baalzebul, and Belial form the only two real alliances in Hell.

In the adventure Fires of Dis, Dispater was behind a plot to ruin a noble crusading paladin and prevent the ascension of the gate-town of Fortitude.[41]

Other publishers[edit]

Dispater appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 9.[15]

Erac's Cousin[edit]

Erac's Cousin
Game information
Homeland Unknown
Gender Male
Race Human
Class Fighter/ wizard
Alignment Lawful Evil
Setting World of Greyhawk

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the man known as Erac's Cousin is a mysterious figure who has not revealed his real name. He is also called simply the Unnamed.

Creative origins[edit]

Gary Gygax's son Ernie originally had a character he called "Erac", in addition to other well-known characters Serten and Tenser. Later, he created a wizard who, due to a personal issue as part of his backstory, refused to reveal his name, simply referring to himself as "Erac's Cousin". Gary Gygax knew that Ernie liked the Barsoom stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs, and at one point, whisked Erac's Cousin off to a very Barsoom-like Mars,[44] where the inhabitants refused to let the wizard use magic. Erac's Cousin was forced to become a fighter instead, and learned to fight proficiently with two weapons simultaneously. Eventually he was able to teleport back to Oerth, but when he acquired two vorpal blades, co-Dungeon Masters Rob Kuntz and Gary Gygax decided he had become too powerful,[44] and lured him into a demon's clutches. The demon took him to an alternative plane that drained the magic from the vorpal blades, destroying them.

The profile of Erac's Cousin was published in TSR's Rogues' Gallery in 1980,[45] and Gary Gygax mentioned Erac's Cousin in several articles in Dragon magazine in 1980 and 1981.[46][47]

When Gary Gygax was forced out of TSR in 1985, the rights to most characters used in his stories and columns, including Erac's Cousin, remained with TSR, and Erac's Cousin was mentioned in further material by both TSR and Wizards of the Coast.

Description[edit]

Erac's Cousin was a mage who was able to wield swords with great proficiency. He was seldom seen without a red-eyed rat on his shoulder, his imp familiar. He commanded an army including 50 medium cavalry, 50 light cavalry, 50 light horse archers, 100 heavy infantry regulars, 100 heavy archer regulars, and 100 pole armed infantry regulars. Many of his troops were rumored to be evil humanoids.

The Unnamed may have been reborn as a greater devil.

History[edit]

Erac's Cousin was once a lawful good human magic-user. He gave up being a spellcaster to become a fighter with a penchant for wielding a pair of vorpal swords.

In one adventure, Erac's Cousin and his cleric companion Ayelerach are purported to have stumbled upon the stone prison of the demon prince Fraz-Urb'luu in the dungeons below Castle Greyhawk. The Prince of Deception, with his honeyed words, tricked the pair into reading from a scroll that released the demon from his prison. The two hapless adventurers were then whisked away by Fraz-Urb'luu to his layer on the Abyss to become his slaves, and the vorpal swords were destroyed. Erac's Cousin and Ayelerach were eventually able to return to the Material Plane, but describe the Abyssal realm they visited as depressing and sickening, due to its totally flat and featureless terrain, and ability to drain the magic out of any item.

Upon his escape from the Abyss, an unknown form of insanity overtook Erac's Cousin and he slew all of his friends to steal their possessions, forsaking his former deity who he blamed for not saving him from the demon prince. Erac's Cousin, now thoroughly evil, made a pact with the archdevil Baalzebul. As a reward for the souls of those he slew, Baalzebul agreed to make Erac's Cousin into a major devil upon his death, despite Erac's Cousin's fear of dying.

There is speculation[48] that Erac's Cousin may have helped form the Horned Society. Many of the Hierarchs were killed by Iuz's vengeance, but one was able to return. This being, known only as the "Unnameable Hierarch" was reborn as a greater devil thanks to a pact with the archfiend Baalzebul.

Fierna[edit]

Lady Fierna is the ruler of the Fourth Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. She is the daughter of arch-Duke Belial and his late consort Naome, and currently shares the rulership with her father. Her unholy symbol, like that of Belial, involves red, glowing eyes over a two-pronged ranseur, surrounded by a red tail with a wicked barb. Fierna was first identified as the ruler of Phlegethos in Dragon #223 (November 1995).[49] Her history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[9] Fierna is described as a human-like, young, and incredibly beautiful she-devil sporting two small horns, a pointed tail and long red nails. She has a very sexual personality and wears very little clothing.

Focalor[edit]

Focalor is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mammon. Focalor first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Focalor appears as a thin, bearded, middle-aged human sage with power and heavy concerns, until he unfurls his feathered wings from his flowing robes or reveals his brown cloven hooves. He wears an iron gauntlet on his right hand as his badge of office. Focalor is a vassal of Mammon, acting as Mammon's seneschal.

Gaziel[edit]

Gaziel is a Duke of Hell in the service of Belial, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Gaziel has a white, skull-like head with hollow eye sockets and small, curling pink horns, so that from a distance he resembles an osyluth. He has a brown to blood-red hued humanoid body, a red forked tail, and black hooves. His tongue is long, slim, purple-red, and forked. His wrists and knees have bulbous, bony joints, and his elbows have hooked spurs. Gaziel is a vassal of Belial, who leads 21 companies of osyluths (bone devils).

Gaziel first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Gaziel was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Gazra[edit]

Gazra the pit fiend is a general and commander of the hamatulas. Gazra is the consort of Fierna. Gazra is jealous and hateful toward Belial, but keeps those feelings well hidden. Gazra was first mentioned in the Monstrous Compendium Outer Planes Appendix (1991).[25]

Glasya[edit]

Glasya is a powerful devil and a Princess of Hell (Baator in 2nd edition version of the game). She is noted to be one of the most powerful and influential of the female devils. Her symbol is a copper scourge. Glasya made her first appearance in Dragon #75, in an article that served as a preview of the then upcoming first edition Monster Manual II.[32] She appeared in the Monster Manual II later that same year in 1983.[33] Glasya is described as being incredibly beautiful. She has copper-colored skin and dark red or black hair. She appears human except that she has bat-like wings, horns, and a forked tail. Glasya is the daughter of the Overlord of the Hells, Asmodeus, and his deceased queen, Bensozia.

Hag Countess[edit]

Hag Countess, also known as Malagard, is the former ruler of Malbolge, the Sixth Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. Her name is spelled Malagarde in Fiendish Codex II[4] and Lamagard in Defenders of the Faith.[50] The Hag Countess was first identified as the ruler of Malbolge in Dragon #223 (November 1995).[49] Her history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[9] The Hag Countess was a gruesome night hag. Her bruise-coloured skin, covered in pimples and varicose veins, constantly seeped with foul blood. Her horrid, gaunt face sported a nearly toothless mouth that smelled of carrion. She also has two large black feathery wings. Despite her decrepit form, the Hag Countess was actually very powerful.[35]

Hutijin[edit]

Hutijin is a powerful Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Hutijin was first detailed in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983).[32] He also appeared in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[33] Hutijin closely resembles a pit fiend, but he is actually a greater, higher-ranking being. His head is larger than a pit fiend's proportionately, and his wings are smaller. His hide is a deep rust-red hue, and bathed in crackling lightning and electricity. He carries a writhing trident.

Levistus[edit]

Levistus is the arch-devil currently ruling Stygia, the Fifth layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. His unholy symbol is a sword thrust through a block of ice, or a cauldron with chunks of ice floating in it. Levistus was first identified as the ruler of Stygia in Planes of Law (1995),[26] and was further described in Dragon #223 (November 1995).[49] His history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[42] Levistus appears as an unnaturally tall, handsome male human. Aside from his completely black eyes, pointed teeth and his height, no features betray his infernal descent.[4]:148

Lilis[edit]

Lilis is the consort of Dispater, the ruler of Dis, the second layer of Baator. She is sometimes referred to as the Iron Maiden.

Publication history[edit]

Lilis first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6]

Lilis was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Lilis is described as an orange-skinned, middle-aged, plump she-devil. She stands 5' tall and sports glowing green eyes. She looks well-preserved and has the usual baatezu's features (bat wings, cloven hooves, forked tail et cetera).

History[edit]

Lilis is said to be one of the most knowledgeable beings in Baator. She runs a large network of spies and informants throughout the Nine Hells for her master, who stands as the sole recipient of her intelligence, as she will not even share such information with the King of Hell, Asmodeus. She also runs a smaller network among mortals and in evil and neutral-aligned planes.

Though Lilis is one of the weakest consorts physically, her careful and very prudent strategies, her attention to detail, and Dispater's protection have allowed her to retain her position as safely as any.

Lilis is the only consort Dispater has ever had throughout his existence, which makes her also one of the oldest consorts of the Nine Hells. Since she's aware of almost anything that happens in Baator (from gossip to hidden conspiracies and major schemes), not a single she-devil has ever tried to depose her.

Lilith[edit]

Lilith is the current consort of Baalzebul, the arch-lord currently ruling the Seventh Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator, Maladomini. She shares the title with the subservient and rather spineless Baftis, another she-devil who wields little power. Lilith first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Lilith is one of the most attractive female devils of Baator. She looks like a scarlet-skinned human female with a serpent's tail. Her hooves and small curved horns betray her nature. She never wears clothing, and cloaks herself in a veil of darkness. She often uses a barbed whip in battle.

Machalas[edit]

Machalas is a Duke of Hell in the service of Levistus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Machalas appears as a tall, thin humanoid with black, scaly skin, a black forked tail, black cloven hooves, large black batlike wings, and large jaws. His horned head is a startling fiery red, and his eyes are slanted and entirely white, so that they appear to have no pupils or irises unless examined very closely. His face appears ugly and batlike (the jaws most prominent), and his voice is a soft, menacing, hissing tone. Machalas was formerly a vassal of Geryon, commanding 11 companies of hamatulas (barbed devils). He presently serves Levistus.

Machalas first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Machalas was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Martinet[edit]

Martinet is a pit fiend and Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus as his constable. Martinet's job is to clean up the frequent political messes of Baator. His influence has stopped several wars from breaking out among the lords, and his diplomacy has ended even more conflicts. Martinet has an extremely level head, and he never flies off the handle. While he is not greatly powerful himself, he is feared because others know he is the voice and mouth of the Dark Lord of Nessus. Martinet served as the escort for Asmodeus' consort Bensozia as she was leading a routine inspection of the layers. While they were traveling across Stygia, Levistus ambushed them and proposed that the Queen of Hell become his consort if she helped him depose Asmodeus. The staunch queen refused harshly and passed him by. Infuriated, the Lord of the Fifth killed Bensozia and her pit-fiend bodyguards while Martinet managed to escape. In 4th edition, Martinet was escorting Bensozia through her inspection of the middle hells when she was murdered by her own daughter, Glasya. Martinet was responsible for framing Levistus for the crime and securing Glasya during the Reckoning of Hell.

Martinet is first mentioned in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] He also appears on a list of devils in the Monster Manual II later that same year in 1983.[33] In the second edition of the game, Martinet appeared in the supplement Guide to Hell (1999), written by Chris Pramas.[9] In third edition, Martinet appeared in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[43] Martinet was briefly mentioned in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Mephistopheles[edit]

Mephistopheles is an Arch-Devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), also known as the "Lord of No Mercy" and the "Cold Lord". Mephistopheles (or Mephisto for short) is the lord of Cania, the eighth plane of Hell. He was the main opponent of Baalzebul during the Reckoning of Hell, and still holds a claim to his own lair. He seeks to take Baalzebul's lair away from him, that he may gain enough power to one day challenge Asmodeus for rulership of all the Nine Hells. His symbol is a flame made of copper and gold, or a red hand with black fingernails shrouded in dark flames. He is constantly coming up with new symbols. Mephistopheles was first detailed in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983).[32]

Moloch[edit]

Moloch is an arch-devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), and once served as the viceroy of Baalzebul. Moloch first appeared in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75, as part of a preview for the Monster Manual II.[32] He appeared in the Monster Manual II later that same year in 1983.[33] Moloch's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Moloch is a great, square-bodied creature with red-orange skin. His limbs are short and thick, and his hands and feet are huge and square, with horns on his feet. His head is also horned, and huge with slanting fiery eyes and a gaping mouth. His monstrous body conceals a genius-level intellect.

Morax[edit]

Morax is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus. Morax is a cloven-hooved, humanoid devil. He has a bull-like head, with massive curved horns (somewhat like Moloch), bat-like wings, and heavily muscled arms. He has a short forked tail. His entire body is a dark, dirty brown in hue, and his eyes are scarlet. He has a cluster of 2-inch-long spines on his chest, and in battle loves to hug victims against this cluster. Morax is a vassal of Asmodeus, commanding 9 companies of pit fiends.

Morax first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Morax was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Naome[edit]

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, Naome "the Golden," was the clever consort of Belial, the arch-devil who formerly ruled the 4th layer of Baator, Phlegethos. She is the mother of Lady Fierna, Belial's daughter who is currently ruling the layer. As of Fiendish Codex II, Naome is deceased. Naome is derived from a real-life mythological demon who sports the same name.

Publication history[edit]

Naome first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6]

Naome was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2]

Naome was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Naome has been successively described as a golden skinned she-devil of great beauty and then as a red-skinned, husky female devil with human-flesh-colored hands, face and shoulders, aside from typical baatezu features (cloven hooves, forked tail etc.), brown hair and pale green eyes. These patterns may suggest she's the one responsible for anything regarding dealing with humans and mortals.

History[edit]

Naome was a skilled seductress and very effective in terms of communication and diplomacy. She was Lady Fierna's personal advisor and was highly regarded for her ability to settle disputes and her shrewdness when bargaining with mortals. Quite surprisingly, she had a very light, pleasant humor, which is a very rare thing among the Dukes of Baator. While she had no real enemy in the Nine Hells, she disliked Glasya and Lilith but was quite friendly to the quiet Baftis, and she felt sympathy for the grim-fated Cozbinaer.

Although not as powerful as her master, Naome's role at Belial's court was very important. It's been said that, as the Reckoning of Hell ended, she advised her consort into placing their daughter on the throne and using her to rule Phlegethos, in order to avoid demotion from Asmodeus. This maneuver has proven to be quite efficient and Naome constantly acted behind the scenes alongside Belial.

Naome met her death at the hands of Asmodeus himself. As of Dragon #360, it has been explained that Asmodeus eventually found out the truth behind Belial's voluntary withdrawal. Not being able to get rid of Belial anymore, Asmodeus decided to punish Naome for being too cunning for his tastes and destroyed her. This last action earned him a bitter grudge from Belial and Fierna.

While rumors go that Belial and Lady Fierna are having an incestuous relationship, it seemed that Naome was unconcerned. Another rumor was that she was actually of undetermined gender, explaining her mannish build.

Neabaz[edit]

Neabaz is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul. Neabaz appears as a smoothly polite, cold-blooded, and very handsome man—save for his tiny pointed horns and transparent, housefly-like wings. He is customarily garbed in black tunic (open at the shoulders to accommodate his wings) and breeches, with a hat and cape of rich, blood-red silk. The cape is magical, having the ability to give forth an aura of flames. When his human-like mouth is open, he can extrude a foot-long proboscis from within and suck blood. Neabaz serves as Baalzebul's herald. Neabaz first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Neabaz was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Neabaz was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Phongor[edit]

Phongor is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Phongor first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Phongor appears as a man with dead-white skin, glittering pink eyes, a hoarse, hissing voice, tiny horns, oily black hair, a forked tail, and red hooves. He wears open purple or black robes, and a belt to carry his whip. Phongor is a vassal of Asmodeus, serving as Asmodeus's inquisitor. Phongor is a rival of Adramalech, and has subverted some of Adramalech's spies. Phongor and Adramalech both feuded with Armaros before he was exiled as an outcast devil and made one of the Rabble of Devilkin.

Rimmon[edit]

Rimmon is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus. Rimmon commands 5 companies of gelugons (ice devils). Rimmon appears as a gelugon with a handsome, human-like diabolic horned head. Rimmon first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Rimmon was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Tartach[edit]

Tartach is a Duke of Hell in the service of Glasya. Tartach first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Tartach appears as a human of giant stature wearing a beard and mustache and with stubby, hooked horns on his forehead. He is a powerful spellcaster, said to be one of the most dangerous workers of magic in the Nine Hells and certainly the most potent in Malbolge, except possibly for Glasya herself. Tartach is currently Glasya's chamberlain and consort. He was formerly a servant of Moloch and Baalzebul, and briefly entered into an alliance with Geryon.

Zagum[edit]

Zagum is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, he commands 30 companies of hamatula (barbed devils). Zagum appears as a gigantic hamatula with a fifteen foot long tail and a jagged row of barbed spines running up his back, cumulating in a bony collar edged with spines at the back and sides of his head. His scaled skin is crimson, his eyes yellow and catlike. His sense of humor and avoidance of cruelty (which he considers self-indulgent) mask a cold-blooded personality.

Zagum first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Zagum was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Zariel[edit]

Zepar[edit]

Zepar is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Zepar appears as a slight, dark-complexioned man dressed in scarlet armor, with a grotesque clubfoot and a forked tail. He has small horns (concealed by his helm) and speaks in a grating, contemptuous voice. Beneath his armor is crimson skin, and a “normal” human foot that has retractile black catlike claws. Zepar is a vassal of Baalzebul, commanding 28 companies of cornugons (horned devils).

Zepar first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Zepar was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Zepar was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part II." Dragon #76 (TSR, 1983)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g McComb, Colin. Faces of Evil: The Fiends. (TSR, 1997)
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Laws, Robin D, and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (Wizards of the Coast, 2006) Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "FC2" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "FC2" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "FC2" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Laws, Robin D, and Robert J Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (Wizards of the Coast, 2006)
  5. ^ a b Schwalb, Robert J. "Infernal Aristocracy." Dragon #361, December 2007. Available online: [1]
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part I." Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983)
  7. ^ a b c d Mentzer, Frank. "Ay pronunseeAY shun gyd" Dragon #93 (TSR, 1985)
  8. ^ McComb, Colin. Faces of Evil: The Fiends. (TSR, 1997)
  9. ^ a b c d e f Pramas, Chris. Guide to Hell (TSR, 1999)
  10. ^ Larme, John. Dangerous Games? Censorship and "Child Protection" (2000).
  11. ^ a b c Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual (TSR, 1977)
  12. ^ James Wyatt. Dungeon Masters Guide (Wizards of the Coast, 2008).
  13. ^ Cordell, Bruce R., Ed Greenwood, and Chris Sims. Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  14. ^ Wyatt, James, and Keith Baker. Eberron Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast, 2009)
  15. ^ a b c Schneider, F. Wesley. Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (Paizo, 2009)
  16. ^ Pulling, Pat; Cawthon, Kathy (1989). The Devil's Web: Who Is Stalking Your Children for Satan?. Huntington House. p. 90. ISBN 0910311595. 
  17. ^ Ravitts, Joseph R. (1981). "Monotheism in Fantasy". Pegasus. Judges Guild (4). 
  18. ^ Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Revisited." Dragon #91 (TSR, November 1984)
  19. ^ a b Gygax, E. Gary. "New denizens of devildom: A partial preview of Monster Manual II" Dragon #75 (TSR, July 1983) Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Dragon75" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  20. ^ Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part II." Dragon #76 (TSR, 1983)
  21. ^ Mentzer, Frank. "Ay pronunseeAY shun gyd" Dragon #93 (TSR, 1985)
  22. ^ Schwalb, Robert J. "Infernal Aristocracy." Dragon #360, October 2007. Available online: [2]
  23. ^ Gygax, Gary. "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom." Dragon #75. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1983
  24. ^ Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual II. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1983
  25. ^ a b LaFountain, J. Paul. Monstrous Compendium Outer Planes Appendix. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1991
  26. ^ a b McComb, Colin, and Wolfgang Baur. Planes of Law. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1995
  27. ^ McComb, Colin, and Monte Cook. Hellbound: The Blood War. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1996
  28. ^ McComb, Colin. "The Lords of the Nine." Dragon #223. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR 1995
  29. ^ Cook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness. Wizards of the Coast, 2002. ISBN 0-7869-2650-3
  30. ^ Laws, Robin D., and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells. Wizards of the Coast, 2006
  31. ^ "Belial". Oxford English Dictionary (3rd ed.). Oxford University Press. September 2005.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  32. ^ a b c d e Gygax, Gary. "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom" Dragon #75 (TSR, July 1983)
  33. ^ a b c d e Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual II (TSR, 1983)
  34. ^ Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part I." Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983)
  35. ^ a b Cook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  36. ^ a b Mearls, Mike, Stephen Schubert, and James Wyatt. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  37. ^ Von Thorn, Alexander. "The Politics of Hell." Dragon #28. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1979
  38. ^ Pramas, Chris. Legions of Hell: Book of Fiends, Volume One. Renton, WA: Green Ronin Publishing, 2001
  39. ^ Schwalb, Robert J. "Codex of Betrayal: Glasya, Princess of the Nine Hells" Dungeon #197 (Wizards of the Coast, 2011)
  40. ^ Cook, Monte. A Paladin in Hell. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 1998. ISBN 0-7869-1210-3
  41. ^ a b Perrin, Steve, and Ray Vallese. Fires of Dis (TSR, 1995)
  42. ^ a b Pramas, Chris. Guide to Hell (TSR, 1999)
  43. ^ a b Cook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  44. ^ a b Kuntz, Robert J.; Behringer, Douglas J. (June 1994). "Tales from the Green Dragon Inn" (PDF). The Oerth Journal (7): 41–44. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 Jan 2006. 
  45. ^ Blume, Brian, David Cook, and Jean Wells. The Rogues Gallery (TSR, 1980).
  46. ^ Gygax, Gary. "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: Greyhawk-the Shape of the World." Dragon #37 (TSR, 1980).
  47. ^ Gygax, Gary. "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: Protection Circles and the Like, Plus News of the North Central Flanaess." Dragon #56 (TSR, 1981).
  48. ^ Erik Mona's speculations on Erac's Cousin
  49. ^ a b c McComb, Colin. "The Lords of the Nine." Dragon #223. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR 1995
  50. ^ "Redman, Rich and James Wyatt. Defenders of the Faith. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000. Page 97.