Distil Networks

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Distil Networks
Privately held
Founded 2011
Founders
Headquarters San Francisco, California, United States
Number of locations
5 offices (2016); 17 CDN Nodes (2015)
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Products
  • Bot Mitigation & Protection
  • API Security
  • Threat Intelligence
Services
  • Blocking Malicious Bots
  • Web Scraping
  • Content Theft
  • Click Fraud
  • Web Application Security
  • Form/Comment Spam
  • Online Fraud
  • CDN
Number of employees
100–200
Website distilnetworks.com

Distil Networks is an American cybersecurity company founded in 2011 and headquartered in San Francisco, California. Its main product provides bot detection and mitigation. Distil also has corporate offices in London, England, Raleigh, North Carolina, Arlington, Virginia, and Stockholm, Sweden.

History[edit]

Distil Networks, originally called Distil.it, was founded in April 2011 by Rami Essaid, Engin Akyol and Andrew Stein, claiming to be the first website bot detection and mitigation solution of its kind.[1] The company name was later changed to Distil Networks. When asked why he founded Distil Networks, Essaid cited his objective was to “help companies tell the difference between a real person and an automated computer program on their web infrastructure in order to prevent web scraping, competitive data mining, account hijacking, online fraud, form spam, man-in-the-browser attacks, digital ad fraud and downtime.”[2]

Key investors in Distil Networks include Bessemer Venture Partners, Foundry Group, ff Venture Capital, Techstars, IDEA Fund Partners, Militello Capital, CIT GAP Funds, and Correlation Ventures.[3][4][5][6][7]

The company has also raised capital through seed money rounds, including individual investors contributing more than $200,000 in one week via AngelList. On May 28, 2014, the company secured $10 million in Series A funding to help fund the growth and expansion of the company.[8]

Initially the Distil Networks client base consisted largely of digital publishers concerned about their news content being stolen and re-used on competitors’ websites. However, due to the wide application of automation in website abuse, web application attacks, business logic attacks, and online fraud, Distil Networks soon branched into protecting other types of websites against malicious bots and threats they create.[9]

Distil Networks raised an additional $21 million on June 30, 2015 in a Series B led by Bessemer Venture Partners to scale up its operations[10] bringing their total financing to date to $44 million.

Technology[edit]

Distil Networks offers products which website owners can use to block web bots and reduce click fraud, web scraping, performance problems, etc.

Its bot detection technology does real-time in-line traffic inspection to analyze more than 40 attributes of each visitor, building a fingerprint to identify each bot.[11]

Distil networks offers its solutions via a Content Delivery Network (CDN), physical or virtual appliances, or a Software Development Kit (SDK) for Native Applications.

Recognition[edit]

  • In December 2012, Rami Essaid was named one of the 14 Young Entrepreneurs to Watch in Washington, D.C. by Under30CEO.[12]
  • In August 2014, Lead411 named Distil Networks one of the "Hottest Companies in DC."[13]
  • In October 2015, the company was nominated as a finalist for Tech in Motion DC's Best Technology Work Culture.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reuven Cohen (23 October 2012). "Getting Plugged Into the Silicon Valley Startup Scene". Forbes. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  2. ^ Bruce Rogers (30 March 2015). "Distil Networks Helps Companies Battle Bad Bots". Forbes. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  3. ^ Tim Conneally (28 January 2013). "There Really Is Something About Distil.it". Forbes. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  4. ^ Tim Conneally. "CIT’s GAP Venture Fund". CIT.org. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  5. ^ "IDEA Fund Partners - Distil Networks". IDEA Fund Partners. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "Distil Networks Secures $10 Million in Series A Funding from Foundry Group and Techstars to Battle Malicious Bots". Business Wire. 28 May 2014. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  7. ^ Ron Miller (30 June 2015). "Distil Networks Raises $21M To Block Malicious Bots". TechCrunch. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  8. ^ "Distil Networks’ $10M Funding Round Valued The Bot Detection Company At Around $30M". TechCrunch. 28 May 2014. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  9. ^ Alex Wilhelm (15 March 2013). "AngelList’s ‘Invest’ service helped Distil Networks add $200k to its $1.8m round in less than a week". The Next Web. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  10. ^ Kristin Pryor (30 June 2015). "Distil Networks Raises $21M to Expand Company". tech.co. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  11. ^ SC Magazine (1 October 2015). "Distil Networks Product Review". SC Magazine. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  12. ^ "Under30CEO Awards: 14 Young Entrepreneurs to Watch in Washington, D.C.". Under30CEO. 3 December 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  13. ^ "2014 Hottest DC Companies". Lead411. 13 August 2014. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  14. ^ Tech in Motion (4 October 2015). "The Washington, DC Timmy Awards". Tech in Motion. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 

External links[edit]